Falcons’ arrival sparks fresh media interest

Falcon

Keeping an eye on things: one of the falcons looks out across the city

The cameras have been live for almost a week now and our peregrine falcons are once again finding themselves in the media spotlight. In the first few days of launching the webcam the birds were featured on both radio and television through BBC Radio Nottingham and BBC East Midlands Today, as well as in print, courtesy of the Nottingham Post. One of the birds was even kind enough to grace us with their presence for the start of an early morning radio piece, proudly perching atop the Newton building to survey the live interview below.

They have been creating the usual reaction on social networking sites too, with people hurriedly flocking to Twitter to post their falcon sightings. While we at falcon HQ have been busy hatching this year’s webcam project, the falcons – who are of course no strangers to this level of interest – are seemingly taking it all in the stride.

Representatives from our environment team and estates and resources team have been busy explaining to the media about what we’re doing differently this year, while Erin McDaid of the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust has been talking at length about the falcons’ breeding and nesting cycles and the careful steps taken to protect them and keep them safe.

Our new blog is receiving some very positive praise too, with comments from viewers such as ‘welcome back’, ‘well done Nottingham’ ‘these new cameras are brilliant’, ‘keep up the good work’ and ‘what wonderful pictures’. And our team of experts have been able to answer viewers’ questions on issues such as the brooding habits of the birds and the way in which the chicks are ringed.

All in all a busy and successful first week for the returning birds and we’re all very much looking forward to taking them under our wing once again.

Dave Rogers
Nottingham Trent University

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14 Responses to Falcons’ arrival sparks fresh media interest

  1. Chris Rumsey says:

    Any idea how long it will be before eggs are laid?

    Are this pair of birds here all the time or do they just return here at nesting time only?

    Like

    • rogdog77 says:

      Hi there –

      Last year the eggs were first spotted in the middle of March with the last of the four eggs arriving on the 24th. The adult birds have been visiting the nest site for some weeks now so the first egg may occur sooner this year – but we will just have to wait and see.

      The pair that nest on the Newton building seem very loyal to their territory and can regularly be seen in the vicinity throughout the year.

      Erin McDaid
      Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

      Like

  2. phill says:

    hi all just found your cam brillant pictures phill in wales is there any way to tell the adults apart
    all the best to all there from me

    Like

    • rogdog77 says:

      Hi there –
      In general terms the best way to tell the male and female apart is by their size. The female is considerably larger than the male – as much as a third larger in fact. Clearly – when looking at one bird at a time the size comparison is not such a useful characteristic, but as well as being smaller overall males birds tend to have a more slender look and females can often have bolder, more striking markings.
      Erin McDaid
      Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

      Like

  3. Johnny Brine says:

    Stunningly clear pictures, but is there any sound?
    Johnny Brine

    Like

  4. Rob says:

    Hi.
    What exactly do the birds eat? (is my simple question, please)
    The Derby birds have eaten a huge variety of species (identified from the remains found, including Swan and Little Owl, apparently, with a bias towards water birds) I just wondered whether the Nottingham birds have a “favourite” food and what they have taken over time? My guess would be mostly pigeon, just on the law of averages, but that’s not the case in Derby, so may not be the case here!
    Thanks

    Like

  5. Ben Phillips says:

    Do they lay eggs each year?

    and at what age do they stop breeding?

    Like

    • rogdog77 says:

      Hi there –
      Yes they lay eggs each year. In terms of what age they breed until, this is difficult to say. In the wild, adults could live up to 15 years and I presume that they will continue to breed whilst they are fit and healthy. However, it is clear that fertility will decline with advancing age but it is difficult to give a definitive answer as it is likely that many birds will die before they reach the point at which they can no longer re-produce.
      Erin McDaid
      Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

      Like

  6. Michael. says:

    Hello.
    Nice to see you now have two camera’s.
    You need some infer-red lights so we can see what’s going on at night.

    Like

  7. Mrs W says:

    Hi – love the HD! Will be watching during the spring with my Year 5 class. Do you know where last year’s 4 chicks are now? Mrs W

    Like

    • rogdog77 says:

      Hi there
      Whilst we did put identification rings on last year’s chicks, unless one is found injured or sadly dead and the ring number sent in for identification we have no way of knowing where they have got to. In the future we hope to be able to track the chicks from the nest more accurately using a type of electronic tag.
      Erin McDaid
      Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

      Like

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