Amazing dedication shows true spirit of the peregrine

Despite the torrents of rain, the mother stays resolute and protects her chicks

Despite the torrents of rain, the mother stays resolute and protects her chicks

At first glance it might be difficult to take any positives from the sad turn of events that saw our peregrine pair lose two of their chicks over the weekend, but the sheer dedication of the female falcon to her brood was amazing. In the face of appalling weather she sat tight – following her instinct to do all she could for her chicks.

I must admit that once it became clear that we had lost at least one of the chicks and most likely two, I feared the worst and assumed she would lose them all – especially seeing how wet she had become by yesterday evening. A brief period away from the nest sparked concern that she may have abandoned the remaining chicks but her return, rather drier than when she had left, did give me a little more hope of them making it through the night.

This morning, whilst sad that we have indeed lost two chicks, I am surprisingly upbeat – delighted that some made it through. Whilst somewhat uncomfortable viewing, it is still an amazing opportunity to watch nature unfold.

In consultation with the team managing the cameras we have decided to restore the live feed – but we will not, at this stage, be removing the dead chicks from the nest. We fear that any more disturbance at this stage might make the female flee the nest.

If anyone has any questions don’t forget that you can contact us via the blog.

Erin McDaid
Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

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291 Responses to Amazing dedication shows true spirit of the peregrine

  1. Malcolm says:

    Thank for update. It was quite awful weather but as you say she stuck to her duties on the nest and looks like she saved 2 chicks in the process.
    Regards, Malcolm

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    • DEREK DENOVELLIS says:

      we noticed last friday that the mother stayed on the chicks while the father fed them all, it looked like the mother was protecting the chicks from the weather then. DEREK

      Like

    • olanda says:

      hi i have come on today to see the chicks are still there but only seen one moving and she dosen’t look like she is wanting to cover them…so sad to know that we have lost two of them but that’s how things go unfortunately. We keep checking on them every few hours and would love to see her make it with her remaining two.

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      • Hannah says:

        I have just watched the luchtime feed and only one chick is alive : (

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      • ellis edmunds says:

        we should leave nature alone, this box should not have been put there for them, then they would have found somewhere more suitable to nest ,its we who are to blame just so we can watch ,we are the worst animal on the planet altering things to when and where suits we.

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      • olanda says:

        has anyone seen the father return….this is usually feeding time…????????

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      • Dianne says:

        Hi I checked them at 7am and Mr and Mrs P were feeding one of the chicks, the other was barely alive. Had a look at them at 4-30 on my return from work to see that only one has survived. 😦

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    • olanda says:

      These amazing animal have been coming to Nottingham for the last ten years..and have raised 16 chick in the last 5years does that not count for anything….They are the ones who decided to nest there…we have gave them a helping had in making a nest which i think is brill….if they didn’t want to nest in it then i am sure they would of found somewhere else to raise their young…..

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      • ellis edmunds says:

        its not a natural nest ,quarrys are there habitat,do we give sparrows chaffinch etc help in hand no leave nature be.

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      • ellis edmunds says:

        exactly what i was saying we enticed them to nest there by putting box there,otherwise they would have found somewhere else.

        Like

    • phily waller says:

      is there any chance when the nesting site gets cleaned out ready for next year could who ever cleans it out fowards the pigeon rings that are in there on to me jsut so i can let the people who birds where killed by these pergrines what happened to them i will pay for carriage for them

      Like

  2. Penny says:

    So glad the cams are back on even though the news is worse than I feared – I was sure one chick had died but heartbroken to know we have lost two. I have just seen the tiercel (I think) return to the ledge, but without food. I can only hope the two remaining, and very weak looking, chicks will soon be fed. At least the sun is now out so we have hope.

    Like

  3. L (ntu student) says:

    have there been any sightings of mr p?

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  4. Clare says:

    Very sad to lose 2 chicks but so glad the others are ok!

    Like

  5. julie907 says:

    I am so pleased that all seems not lost, its so sad and I gutted but it is nature, I have mulled this over so much this last 24 hrs and realised that while we are privileged to see the falcons at such close proximity we can never afford to be complacent as life can turn on its head in a whisper as yesterday proved. Spare a thought for the unmonitored nests of this country also, who must have lost lives yesterday… this is nature at its cruelest.

    The sun is shining today so fingers crossed that mum and dad can turn this around.

    Like

  6. Joyce S in Derby says:

    So very sorry to hear that two of the little chicks have perished. You must all be gutted.
    Hope this bout of sunshine will help the adults and surviving chicks.
    As you say, the female was so dedicated to them, sitting tight in all that rain and high wind.
    Positive thoughts now, everyone.

    Like

  7. Sarah Wales says:

    This so sad. I have followed this feed right through. Has she returned to the nest this morning?

    Like

  8. js1961 says:

    No roof so they got very wet. It’s very sad, but I think it demonstrates the value of having a nest box with a roof. Here’s hoping the other 2 chicks (which don’t seem to be moving very much) will survive.

    Like

    • jaredntu says:

      We will have a full review of this year’s falcon project at the end of the season. But it’s worth noting that relatively this has been a very successful nesting site over the past few years – it’s just hard to cater for weather as awful as it was yesterday.

      Like

      • js1961 says:

        Yes I understand – in the wild these birds have to cope with bad weather and this takes its toll. I was very impressed by the fortitude and dedication of the adults protecting their young.

        Like

      • vince says:

        I totally agree with your response but the events of the weekend have shown the extent that weather changes may have on our rare & valued wildlife. We are encouraging bio-diversity within our Cities via evolving Architectural design that creates such habitats & environments that may be suitable for the majority of times. However, due possibly to the effects of global warming, in hope that the Falcons with forget the events of yesterday & return, can be better prepared for next year by offering shelter that will cater for all weather conditions?

        Vince

        Like

    • Kim Kirkham says:

      I think if they did have a shelter it may have helped, however these birds are used to living out on high cliff edges so shelter isn’t an option and also it may stop them from coming back each year if we started messing about in their habitat..

      Like

  9. luna moonflower says:

    Thank you for the update. What a strange mixture of devastation, dedication, tragedy and hope. So moving. Could someone please explain what happened over the weekend – was this just as a result of the terrible weather? Thank you.

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Very sad. Yes, it was as a result of the horrendous weather.

      Like

    • redtedng9 says:

      Just to clarify the weather situation for those outside Nottingham. The storm which arrived during Saturday night meant very heavy wind and rain solidly for almost twenty hours. The temperature hovered around 5 centigrade , and the mother pereguine must have been both cold and drenched , yet she did everything to protect her chicks. As far as I could see, the birds had no food during that time. Things are looking difficult at the moment-nature in front of our eyes can sometimes appear very cruel, but this is mother nature.

      Like

      • Will Tanner says:

        Yes I agree, nature can be very cruel, every time they bring in a racing pigeon I think of their youngsters in the nest.

        Like

  10. Damian Taylor says:

    Sad news to wake up to and hope the remaining 2 survive. If she had abandoned the nest would she then have had a second brood as the weather inproved?

    Like

  11. Anne says:

    Thank you for the update. So very sad to lose 2 chicks. I could see 1 was dead yesterday evening & the others looked so weak, it was heart breaking. Do hope the remaining 2 survive.

    Like

  12. Amy says:

    Yes, it is sad. I am also happy to know at least two have survived and I too would like to know the status of Daddy Falcon. I hope he is ok and has just been sheltering somewhere. Please let us know as soon as you know.

    Like

  13. Anonymous says:

    Very sad to see that two of the babies have lost their lives……looking at what I think is Mrs P just now on the camera she looks to have either “killed” but bought nothing back to the nest or has been injured 😦 Hopefully the remaining babies get some food quickly…….be a shame to lose them also. Definitely nature at it’s cruelest but what an amazing thing to be a part of and be able to watch so closely over the last few years.

    Like

  14. Sarah says:

    Im watching what i assume is mummy falcon at the minute, the 2 chicks left look very weak and i havent seen one of them move at all since i started watching. Hopefully they’ll get some food soon, be a shame to lose them too!

    Like

  15. terry davies says:

    What a sad day,I watched nearly all day yesterday & what a caring mother p is.God bless the remaining chicks xxx

    Like

  16. Claire says:

    Really sad last night when I saw 1 chick obviously died and was frantic when live stream went off, Tragic that another chick is dead. Hope & pray for the whole Falcon family.

    Like

  17. Anny says:

    So sad about the two chicks. Has Mrs P. sustained an injury to her beak or is it ‘leftovers’ from a kill? – it doesn’t look right!

    Like

  18. Daisy says:

    Absolutely heartbreaking to see the demise of the chicks after watching them hatch and initially doing so well. As per earlier comment haven’t seen anything of Mr P – hope to see his return soon – Mrs P looking tired and the chicks looking like they desperately need food. Fingers crossed they get some good feeds in today before the return of the rain…..

    Like

  19. Kate says:

    Has the male been seen recently? I heard on the radio that he has not been spotted for 2 days.

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Hi Kate – thanks for your tweets earlier. Not spotted him yet, keeping a very close eye out obviously. All very sad

      Like

  20. Lynda says:

    What a wonderful mother, she looked so cold & waterlogged yesterday but she didn’t give up – I couldn’t leave the screen all day. I cried when I read the blog this morning, I realised that one chick had gone but didn’t realise that it was two, what a shame. Lets hope that Mr P returns soon & she gets some help.

    Like

  21. Jimbob says:

    Nearly all wild Peregrines will “nest” under an overhang, The fact they are nesting on a building which is hardly a natural cliff face surely dosen’t meen they can’t be given an unnatural overhang? The nest itself is unnatural, why not out of season give them a bit of a hand before it happens to next years chicks? these deaths could of been avoided.

    Like

    • kevin says:

      who told you that ive seen plenty of nests that were exposed to the weather.The reason perigrines are nesting in towns is there are alot of them, and they cant find any where else.If the nest box had not been there they would of nested on roof which would not have been so good

      Like

  22. roy gardner says:

    thanks for restoring the live feed again,I watched all day yesterday and it was indeed very distressing,it was obvious from the camera movements events were being closely monitored thanks for a fantastic experience.

    Like

  23. Fiona says:

    Amazing instinct of the mother has saved the two wee lives but I am still concerned that the non brooding parent is not making kills. Would the lack of noise and movement from the weakened survivors lessen the feeding instinct in the parents?

    Like

  24. sturisoma says:

    any thoughts on the male?

    Like

  25. Realityisok says:

    Is this the Disney channel, or real WILDLIFE……censorship because something isn’t fluffy and cute?
    We wanted to see what had happened to her when it became light….we would have coped….!!!!

    Like

    • Irene says:

      We adults would have coped but what about all the children watching. My daughter (head teacher) told me this morning that the children in her school were very upset when they heard the news so pictures would have made it worse.

      Like

      • Nanny State says:

        honestly, they need to grow up – it is all part of the education. you cannot pick and choose the fluffy fluffy moments when you are trying to teach about nature. Feed shouldnt have been cut.

        Like

  26. Fiona says:

    A neighbour has just related that he saw a peregrine in an air battle with what looked like a hen harrier over the cattle market on Saturday Morning….Could Mr P be injured from a scrap like that and lying low to heal?

    Like

  27. Really sorry to hear the loss of your chicks over the weekend, and great to see the cameras are working again.. We were watching your cameras with great concern, as well as our own on Sunday. May I comment on a remark on your blog about your decision not to cause further interference by removing the dead chick?

    Not only is this the best decision, but it is also the only one in law. In Derby we went through an identical dilemma a couple of years ago when two of our young chicks died and were being fed to the remaining chicks. I was all set to abseil down and retrieve the carcasses for analysis, but not only did DEFRA refuse us permission, but Derbyshire Police strongly advised that enforcement action would be taken against us if we tried, no matter how well meaning our actions might have been to us. With so many sites being persecuted, the police now need to be seen to be taking enforcement action against any infringement of the law protecting birds of prey, and it caused much debate on our blog and on our comments page, with some people even leaving in disgust that we were not helping when, in reality, we were doing everything we could and more for these wild birds. I know you guys must be feeling the same right now.

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Couldn’t agree more Nick…..negative comments about the follow up actions are not helping. We have to bow to a greater knowledge in this instance. From a “lay persons” point of view I can see how interfering with the chicks would upset Mrs P and possibly cause her to flee the nest. I feel this is the only option in this case….we are always being told not to take eggs etc from nests so surely this has to be the same action. I think you are all doing an amazing job – keep up the good work!

      Like

  28. Ian Fretwell says:

    Ok so there are two alive and one dead in the nest, whats happened to the other one, its thast its carcass on the nest floor?

    Like

  29. LJ says:

    The male was definitely there Saturday afternoon, as I watched them both feed the chicks. Here’s hoping he was just sheltering from the terrible weather and will reappear soon.

    Like

  30. sue says:

    I completely agree that the best decision is to leave nature alone to do its thing. We should not be interfering with these wonderful birds – hard though it is to maintain our distance. I was heartbroken watching yesterday’s events unfold and feared we had lost all four chicks by the time night came. But I was also amazed at the strength and determination of the falcon to try to care for her chicks as best she could. We humans could learn a thing or two!

    Today things look a little brighter. I only hope the tiercel is ok.
    If the Falcon needs to she will feed the dead chicks to the live ones. It may seem horrific from a human standpoint but nature is hard and she will be doing what she has to do to look after her chicks.

    Like

  31. Mandy says:

    I haven’t seen any movement from either of the remaining chicks, which are now in the shade. I haven’t been able to watch them all the time this morning. Has anyone else seen them move? Are they dead?

    Like

  32. Donna says:

    Gutted particularly as I have watched this one from the start. Amazed at how she protected the chicks through this ordeal. An overhang/roof does seem to be appropriate. So hope Mr P returns with food soon. Thank you for sharing footage of this nest with us.

    Like

  33. Ann Amos says:

    I can hardly bear to look! When I logged on earlier, the chicks were on their own. I see Mum is back with them now but are they being fed???

    Like

  34. Dot says:

    So sorry about the chicks(eyases) even though I know it is nature. First season I have watched falcons. Had been posting videos of your falcons and loved watching the chicks. When I saw them yesterday knew something was wrong and that is why I emailed you and asked someone there (UK)how to contact you. . Was the first baby falcon chicks I had seen.

    Like

  35. PamUK says:

    What an awful day it was yesterday in so many ways. Thank you for your updates. Let’s hope the male is able to provide some food today for the survivors. Glad the camera survived the weather too – it was certainly shaking about yesterday. See you on the Midland news ????

    Like

  36. StellaCorfu says:

    So sorry to hear the news. I thought they were OK when I looked this morning. I couldn’t watch yesterday, the weather was so awful and I had a feeling something like this would happen. I hope the remaining chicks will thrive and reach maturity.

    Like

  37. Anonymous says:

    Poor Mrs P looks exhausted…..how distressing 😦

    Like

  38. I whatched the Falcons all weekend and was pretty sure they had lost one..this sadly is nature and birds of prey quite often lose half their chicks but very sad and i hope they continue with their remaining chicks.

    Like

  39. Doreen Wright says:

    Very sad to see we’ve lost two of the chicks, just glad theres still two alive.. If the male bird doesn’t come back how are they going to get food? Can you intervene and hand rear them? Could the rspca help and feed the chicks with a syringe? It’ll be such a shame to lose the last two aswell, thanks Steve Wright

    Like

  40. lee rush says:

    Would a Roof on the nest box my have prevented the loss ?

    lee…

    Like

  41. Worried about them all day yesterday and so very sorry to hear two of the chicks had died. They have made fascinating viewing and my grand daughters will be very sad. Hope theings will improve for them now and that Dad will reappear.

    Like

  42. So sad to loose the chicks and i know its mother nature but was very upset when i read it this morning.

    Like

  43. Stephanie Fowler says:

    If Mr P doesn’t come back, will she abandon the nest? Has he been seen?

    Like

  44. Christine says:

    2.25pm – monday, I’m suprised and delighted that two chicks appear to have survived, let’s look on the bright side, there are feathers in the nest, does this mean they have had a proper feed, the female probably had to feed the two dead chicks to the survivors – she HAD to so they would survive. There was a similar situation at Derby one year but this is nature at it’s most cruel. Has anyone seen the male today ? Will the female be able to go off on a quick hunt if the male doesn’t show ? I guess this would leave the two remaining chicks too exposed to predators ? She may not be able to keep it up for long. I agree that no-one has the right to interfere with the nest, it is against the law for one thing and I’m sure the parents will do their best. Many thanks to the team for taking time to update, I didn’t sleep very well last night

    Like

  45. Maxine says:

    Can’t add much else to say to this sad set of circumstances that hasn’t already been said, except for NTU/NWT to think about constructing a more sheltered nest box on that ledge next spring, as per the De Mortel Peregrine falcon nest box cam:
    http://www.hancockwildlife.org/forum/viewtopic.php?showtopic=522
    http://www.peregrinefalcon-bcaw.net/viewtopic.php?f=37&t=1038&start=40

    I hope it’s ok to post the above links, if not and they have to be removed, just do a google search for De Mortel Peregrine nest box cam.

    Like

  46. Christine says:

    Has anyone seen the male today ??? Have they been fed ???

    Like

  47. Sue says:

    She looks very tired today, and still no sign of the male. How long will she be able to look after the 2 remaining chicks alone? Will there come a point when she has to ‘think’ of her own survival over theirs?

    Like

  48. So sad to hear this. I was worried when I seen how drenched she was yesterday. She is so dedicated. I hope they get some proper food today the chicks and Mr P is ok.

    Like

  49. Nottm says:

    The female looks to have injured her beak and her left eye looks ‘dead’ as well. First time I have followed them and am so sorry that not all the chicks have made it. Hopefully the remaining two will pick up soon – saw mum trying to feed them earlier and only one appeared to make any effort to take the food. Fingers crossed!

    Like

    • JustMyself says:

      I’m pretty sure it’s leftover food on her beak and when her eye looks “dead” she’s just resting. Hope that puts your mind at rest.

      Like

  50. Its certainly food on her beak and eye is good. I just hope her other 2 chicks do well.

    Like

  51. desperatlyseekingMrP says:

    Would there be any other reason Mr P hasnt showed up other than him being injured or possibly worse? 😦 Starting to fear for all of the chicks avnt seen any of them have a proper feed today 😦

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Looks like he’s just arrived back!

      Like

      • Anonymous says:

        He looked injured…do you think?? We wondered if they had some sort of “altercation” if it was a rival bird?? Hope all will be well now….so relieved they are feeding!

        Like

  52. hedgeypig says:

    She’s caught something. Chicks are alone but not looking too bad. Hopefully she’ll feed them when she’s eaten

    Like

  53. Jane says:

    It’s so sad, they was doing so well. The parents have been great & it been brilliant that we have been able to watch them.

    Like

  54. sue says:

    Falcon & Tiercel feeding on camera one. Both look fine. Hope they save some for the babies!

    Like

  55. hedgeypig says:

    Hurray, both birds now on the ledge 14:47

    Like

  56. Alison says:

    He has just joined her on the ledge. Hopefully the little ones will get some food now.

    Like

  57. Ben says:

    The tiercel has just returned with a morsel of food. Just when I was starting to fear the worst for his and the remaining chicks’ welfare. There seemed to be a bit of bonding going on between the adults – it looked like they were pleased to see each other!

    Like

  58. Maurice says:

    The female just left the nest (2:35pm,) the 2 chicks seem more alert now. Within 5 minutes the male appeared on the ledge and was eating a small bird. A few minutes later the female returned with some prey and joined the male on the ledge. Hopefully the chicks will be fed soon and things look a lot better for them now 🙂

    Like

  59. nadine evans says:

    so glad the male is back!!!!! 2 chicks feeding well!

    Like

  60. Steve says:

    Just seen both parents together…… and now Mrs P is feeding the chicks. Sighs of relief all round!

    Like

  61. Anne says:

    What a relief! Mr P arrived with food, chicks being fed

    Like

  62. dean says:

    it is nice to see mrp back

    Like

  63. Shirley Stirland says:

    amazing to see Mr P back,now there is some hope 🙂

    Like

  64. Christine says:

    Hip, hip HOORAY !!!! Thank the lord he’s back, I hope she gave him a rollickin’ on behalf of all of us – I’m going to open a bottle of wine tonight in celebration ( any excuse), just seen them have a bit of food – Amen

    Like

  65. desperatlyseekingMrP says:

    Phew!!! So pleased he’s back missed them feeding for the school run but so pleased to hear they have had a good feed 🙂

    Like

  66. Tom F says:

    Having watched the nest before the weekend it was evident that two would not survive. The healthier two were much larger and seemed to be getting the lions share of food. Sad to watch but Its good to see that natures laws of ‘survival of the fittest’ are being adhered to and the nest is being left well alone.

    Like

  67. Nicola says:

    So pleased that things are looking up again for the P family 🙂

    Like

  68. Bob says:

    R.I.P. pidegeons!

    Like

  69. fiona says:

    Fantastic news!

    Like

  70. chris morley says:

    just a general bit of info,saker falcon was seen in gedling 10am two of us witnested the two peregrines seeing her off ,never thought in my lifetime i would be able to say that,ps gedling pair mating again presume eggs failed

    Like

  71. Penny says:

    Since it is apparently not possible for the dead chicks to be removed from the nest by human intervention, what is likely to happen to them? I am noticing an increasing number of flies and bluebottles around them.

    Like

    • daventu says:

      It is likely that the mother will at some point move them out of the nest – but there is also a possibility that she may eat them.

      Like

      • Penny says:

        ~Thanks for your prompt reply Dave – I thought that something like this would happen. We shall just have to wait and see.

        Like

  72. Pip says:

    No sign of either parent for about the last half an hour, chicks must be frozen :o(

    Like

  73. andy says:

    Must admit that the chicks seem to have been left on there own for rather along time…..this is not right at such a young age……something is not right either with one or both adult falcons.

    Like

  74. Holly/steven says:

    Rather concerned at how long the chicks have been left for,,, and they have had little food today

    Like

  75. Steve says:

    Mr P has arrrived with food…. but the chicks are not exactly clamouring for it… they seem very weak.

    Like

  76. jane smith says:

    just arrived back with food but only one has been feeding the other one hasnt had anything yet….

    Like

  77. Steve says:

    One chick is feeding well now…. has the other lost the will to live?

    Like

  78. Anonymous says:

    Very worried about the second chick….not feeding at all…doesn’t even seem interested.

    Like

  79. Jimbob says:

    Theres a 3rd chick fading,it could be saved if it gets warmed up

    Like

  80. Penny says:

    It does appear that only one of the remaining chicks has the strength to lift its head for food. I fear we may lose a third chick before long, although I do hope it will survive.

    Like

  81. Sean Wylie says:

    16:30 ish,…. small amount of food brought to the nest, but alas, only one of the chicks showed any interest at all, and got very little of it before the parent flew away with what was left 😦

    Like

  82. Jimbob says:

    If you called in a local falconer to warm the 3rd dying chick up and give it a feed it would certainly live.

    Like

    • Tom F says:

      They are not kittens! Best left alone…let nature decide

      Like

    • JustMyself says:

      I don’t think they’re allowed to step in and help. They’re wild birds and sadly nature is not always kind. Heartbreaking to watch I know 😦

      Like

    • JustMyself says:

      “Peregrines are included in the list of species in Schedule 1 of the Act, which means that they are given more protection than other species. In effect, this means that higher penalties can be imposed by the courts. As a Schedule 1 species, Peregrines are also protected from intentional or reckless disturbance at their nest sites.” This says to me that any interferance could well be deemed illegal.

      Like

  83. jane smith says:

    oh i didnt see one of the chicks have anything at all, it really doesnt look very well at all

    Like

  84. jane says:

    Dad has just been back and feed them ,and gone again .So hope all turns out o.k .Felt for the mother yesterday .

    Like

  85. chris morley says:

    can you not take the smaller chick,otherwise i fear for its life,sure she wont leave the other chick please take it out before its to late

    Like

  86. Jimbob says:

    if you are going to create an unnatural nesting site,at least give them a helping hand now its all going wrong.There’s a very experienced peregrine guy in notts who could help save those chicks.

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      Sorry Jim but no human has “created” this nest site….this is where the peregrines have taken to “nesting” themselves! The sheer walls of the Uni mimic the cliff faces and its their own choice to keep coming back and indeed have done for the last 10 ish years! They cannot intervene on this “natural” happening and as has been raised before face prosecution if they do….it’s hearbreaking to watch but there is very little anyone can do.

      Like

      • David says:

        Sorry Anonymous this is man made nature.
        If the nest box was not placed there by man it is most unlikely these or any other Peregrines would choose this as a nest site.

        Like

    • Tom F says:

      I would like to think that an ‘experienced’ handler would refuse to go anywhere near a nesting pair of wild Peregrines? If he did I would certainly be straight on the telephone to the RSPB

      Like

      • Anonymous says:

        Sorry David.. I am sure if you do even the tiniest bit of research you would know that the peregrines “chose” the University as their nest site some 10 or more years ago, long before anyone even knew they were there and long before the “box” was introduced. The box was only introduced following consistent return visits to the nest site and not without consultation with the Wildlife Trust, before they did so. I still maintain that the birds “choose” this site themselves. Hopefully despite the sad events of the last few days they they continue to “choose” the site to breed and we can once again see these majestic birds do what they and Mother Nature do best.

        Thanks again to NTU and Wildlife Trust to allow us this amazing insight.

        Like

      • gfoster says:

        these killing machines like sparrow hawks who are devastating our song birds should
        not be encouraged into the cities this is not a natural habitat and most bird lovers
        exept blood thirsty twiters like you. would gladly like to see them culled before they
        become over populated/ sparrowhawk numbers are at the highest levels for years
        while songbirds continue decline along with our small bird populations.so while
        do gooders like yourself fund this out of touch organization our feathered friends
        will continue to be meals for these killers.

        Like

  87. Doc says:

    agree the chick does seem weakened and unabled to even accept food

    Like

  88. andy says:

    It does look like the third chick is struggling to lift its head, do hope it survives but it doesnt bode very well.

    Like

  89. hedgeypig says:

    Mrs p has returned. Hopefully that poorly chick will warm up.

    Like

  90. Maurice says:

    Mrs P is back, providing some sought after warmth to the chicks. Hopefully the othe r check was fed earlier.

    Like

  91. just me says:

    Hope Mrs P can give some much needed warmth for both chicks!

    Like

  92. Doc says:

    glad to see Mum is back..warmth is needed and hopefully another feeding soon

    chichester chicks are doing well…I think the canopy on their nest box helps to shelter
    them from heavy rain….good thoughts for Notts falcon family…and eyasses.

    Mum feeding chichester chicks now…

    Like

  93. andy says:

    As destressing and awful as it is to see how sad and cruel nature can be, we must remember that these are wild birds that they choose to nest where they have on the ntu…….we are privilideged to take a look into there life’s with the joys of a web cam……but again there are many other peregrines nesting all over the country, along with many other birds of prey and other wild birds, and what we are wittnessing at the moment is sadly just mother nature, it will be happening in hundreds of other nest of all sorts of birds at the moment…..its just we don’t get to see it, so sadly if you don’t like it don’t watch……….sorry if that sounded harsh but its just nature.

    Like

  94. shaun bannister says:

    personally id have pulled the smaller eyasses incubated and fed them for a few days then replaced them
    they would not imprint the parents would be unlikely either desert the site or to reject them upon their return ,whislt its good to see the site, it is not well constructed and contary to some comments does not accurately replicate their sites on cliffs which seldom lack a sheltering overhang in my experience ,on a moral note we are either invovled or we are not ,if we are not hen pull the cameras remove the shinlgle and see where they nest ,if we are as in this case then i would’ve pulled them exceptional weather means exceptional actions this is not survival of the fittest just survival of the first born

    Like

    • daventu says:

      If we had removed the chicks from the nest we would almost certainly have been guilty of an offence under the terms of the Wildlife & Countryside Act (due to risk of disturbance). Once a problem had been observed the female very rarely left the nest – sitting tight doing her best to keep the chicks warm. Therefore if we had accessed the nest at a time when the adult birds were under severe stress we would have risked them deserting.

      In terms of the design/location of the nest itself the pair have used it very successfully over many years raising good size clutches without any real problems to with the weather. Whilst we can see both sides of the argument regarding intervening we feel that as wild birds we should let nature take its course. The cameras were primarily installed for security – to prevent the nest being attacked – and we now have the added privilege of being able to share the ability to observe the family with the general public – even if the viewing can become difficult at times.

      Erin McDaid
      Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

      Like

      • David says:

        My I take this opportunity to thank NWT and Nottingham Universty for this most compelling insight into Peregrine life. Something my family and I enjoy yearly not only here but around other sites in the country.
        Please when you review this years events consider a new box with a roof to add a level of protection. Just because in previous years the site hasn’t suffered with weather problems it has this year and as such considering an upgrade for future years is a must.
        I would gladly contribute to a fund to achieve this. You have my contact details if this is something you wish to pursue.
        KR
        David

        Like

      • shaun bannister says:

        thank you for your reply erin i can assure you as a practcing falconer we are very much on the same side and i dont envy you your quandry ,the answer is only simple with hindsight!
        as for that particular act im well aware of it and would risk the argument, the likelyhood being that you would be treated harsher than a child killer however i digress whats done is done ,and despite previous sucess at the site it could still use a bit of tweaking for next season
        good luck with that i hope you take it on board and thank you all for the work you have carried out so far in providing one of the best shown nest sites

        Like

      • malc says:

        hi erin thanks for the great web cam of the falcons nest been watching just before the first egg hatched it realy is amazing and a privilege to watch , but you will always get one who thinks thay know better than anybody else you stick to what you are doing
        thanks again malc

        Like

  95. Eileen says:

    Weather forecast for tomorrow is heavy rain again,are we going to see further drama,I do hope that they survive.

    Like

    • Sally Tate says:

      I dont think the rain will be as heavy, or last as long as Sunday’s downpour. Besides they have had a chance to recover now that there are two on the job!

      Like

  96. Lynn says:

    Where as I agree with you Andy it is Mother Nature and she can be very cruel it dosent mean we have to like it but we do have to accept this is the way of things, any thing wild has a hard time of it and its a privilige to be able to watch in awe of these beautiful birds and learn from them.

    Like

  97. Lynn says:

    I think a bit more shelter wouldn’t be amiss either.

    Like

  98. just me says:

    i agree a little more shelter, maybe a thought for the future in these days of climate change, surely it cant do any harm?

    Like

  99. Alison says:

    We have only been following the peregrines since Thursday evening and it is such a privilege being able to watch the family up close and personal. Although I have only been watching a short time, I was very upset to see that 2 of the chicks have died. She is a dedicated Mother and I felt for her yesterday seeing her so bedraggled. I am routing for the 2 remaining babies.

    Like

  100. anonymous says:

    Good to see food in the next again but extremely worried that the third chick appears not interested in food and very weak 😦

    Like

  101. Ian Fretwell says:

    7pm looks like only one chick is feeding thr othrer has not even lifted his head once!

    Like

  102. Charlie. says:

    One Adult has returned with a pigeon (from the look of the Ring on it’s leg,) but there is only one Chick feeding..The other doesnt seem to have the strenght to move it’s head.

    Like

  103. andy says:

    As daventu say’s it is hard to watch, but we can all learn the harsh lesson of nature, i have recently returned from north wales and had the pleasure of watching a pair of peregrines nesting there on a costal cliff ledge, and believe me the weather they had to deal with was far more inclement than that of what we have had recently here, and when and if any of there chicks survive they have then got the ordeal of fledging with a sheer drop into the sea if they don’t make it. I love these birds as much as anyone else but we need to detatch ourselves and like i said before enjoy the privilige of having a glance into there wonderful world. As we watch them now it does seem as though something is not right both adult birds seem to be spending far to long away from the scrape, when they should be brooding more, maybe something has happened to one of the adults, we will never know, also if they have been nesting on the ntu for ten years this would make them quite old in peregrine years.

    Like

  104. Jason Cresswell says:

    Look now eating someone’s Racing Pigeon. Not very nice. I wonder how many more they will devour!!

    Like

  105. Shirley Stirland says:

    well mum just fed strongest chick,sadly the other is too weak or gone,hopefully not too much rain tonight..what is going on with dad? I don,t understand why he is keeping away for so long?

    Like

  106. terry davies says:

    I fear we are now down to one as only one took foodas the other was too week

    Like

  107. Tom F says:

    When was the last time the male made an appearance?

    Like

  108. Paul says:

    Being a falconer I think lessons can be learned from this year and there should be protection for the peregrines from the inclement weather in the future. If this was my call I would try to save one of the chicks this year and intervene and hand rear.

    Like

  109. JGS says:

    I think it is a great privilege to watch these magnificent birds and the intimate details of their lives. I am also in agreement with providing a nest box that provides better protection from the elements. In the wild, away from the city, peregrine falcons normally find a ledge with an overhang. The nest box should at least have a roof and two closed sides to provide protection for the parents as well as the chicks. I believe there are now three dead chicks. This tragedy could have possibly been prevented with the proper housing. I would hope that changes are made to the nest box for next year. As humans we can do our part to protect wildlife as much as we can. It is bad enough that the survival rate for birds of prey is 80% unfavorable.

    Like

  110. joanne says:

    please tell me is the 3rd chick ok

    Like

  111. Sean Wylie says:

    It’s light enough now to see that it looks like we may well have lost the 3rd chick. So so sad.

    Like

  112. Sean Wylie says:

    Scratch that last comment,…. I have been watching avidly since first light, and the 3rd chick had made no movement whatsoever with it’s head layed to one side looking to all as though it was indeed finished,….. however, I have just watched mum shift around a little and the chick is lifting it’s head, albeit very very weak !!

    Like

  113. Lynn C says:

    Just dawn for you, nighttime for us- watching her wake up. Hope dad shows up soon… will she try to raise the remaining chick herself?

    Like

  114. paul friend says:

    male bird made a brief appearance about 2 minutes at 6.57am with no food

    Like

  115. desperatlyseekingMrP says:

    7.22am Mr & Mrs P feeding the one remaining chick looks to be having a really good feed,im sure that little thing crnt get much more down it! lol

    Like

  116. Karen says:

    Looks like a third chick is giving up the will to live. It just hasn’t got the strength to open its mouth to be fed, so the strongest chick is getting the lot. Mum has just started eating one of the dead chicks I think (but she turned her back to the camera to do it) and dad has just returned back with some more breakfast. Hopefully they will successfully raise one chick, which after the weekend storms would be a major achievement.

    Like

  117. Karen says:

    You know looking at this, I am not sure they will even manage to raise the last strongest chick. It seems to really on the edge…… Dad just flew off with his food without feeding the chick who was looking on, then left looking v cold. When mum returned she sat more on the dead chicks than on the one who is a little stronger…so he will not be getting much warmer yet…

    Like

  118. Kerry says:

    Just logged on and saw mum and dad feeding the last chick which was sad to learn another had been lost but the chick look strong. A bit uneasy however when I discovered it was one of the chicks they were feeding it with…..again this is nature

    Like

  119. Ashley says:

    This is the best news ive had in a long while. The death of two chicks will save the lives of countless songbirds and racing pigeons, including my own. No doubt i will get criticised for this but whats worse, the death of a peregrine chick or the death of 100 songbirds? I know what i would choose

    Like

    • anon says:

      Get a life will you,domestic felines kills millions more than all the peregrines in the uk.FACT

      Like

    • julie907 says:

      Its nature ashley, I love all birds but as with humans, some smaller creatures are part of the food chain.

      Like

    • Nanny State says:

      Peregrine prey is not typically songbirds… do you have a cat Ashley – one would hope not!!!

      Like

    • shaun bannister says:

      what you will get criticised for ashley is not your opinion which sucks but your blatant lack of knowledge ,keep watching and get educated, prime food source for urban peregrines are those rather scabby disease carrying feral pigeons

      Like

  120. fiona says:

    This is nature in the raw, this is uncomfortable as we humans in the west are used to being sheltered from the worst of it. Just look historically in the west or even to the horn of Africa today and children die when things go wrong. I am so grateful to the wildlife trust and NTU for the chance to observe this very humbling natural phenomenon. Having watched magpies kill and not even consume a whole nest of starlings in our garden, it’s part of a pattern, an ancient pattern and we have no right or morally sanctioned ability to intervene.

    Time to reflect, should our children be fed the sugar coated Disney
    pill of life and death or this sort of well managed reality check? I know which my children prefer and it’s not from across the pond!

    Like

  121. Je suis si triste de ce qui se passe .. J’ai suivi ce couple de faucons depuis le début , j’ai assisté à l’éclosion des oeufs en direct avec beaucoup d’émotion. La détresse des parents et la mort des deux petits est infiniment triste pour moi . Quel courage des parents sous ce déluge de pluie !
    J’espère de tout coeur que les deux autres petits vont survivre . Mireille

    Like

  122. m moore says:

    i think its time inervene

    Like

  123. anon says:

    The 3rd chick is still alive but unable to lift its head,it will be dead soon,warmed up and fed for a day or so then replaced would do no harm.

    Like

    • FRANNY says:

      Hi anon but i don’t agree as that would be interfering with nature

      Like

      • anon says:

        I beg to differ,haven’t you seen the wildlife programme with the baldy chap,going out to help young badgers,fox cubs,deer fawns,and all manner of bird life and yes includes lots of species that shouldn’t be touched or your breaking the wildlife and countryside act by interfering…wheres the difference…

        Like

      • FRANNY says:

        Beg to differ all you want if anyone was to intervene on the peregrine chicks behalf then they are interferering with nature fact. same as the “quote baldy chap”end quote is doing no difference these town sites are not natural sites with there artificial boxes and deep shingle would the nest have survived all the rain without the box answer “no” most of the pigeons brought back to these artificial town sites are not feral pigeons but are racing pigeons (someones property) a lot of these pigeons cost £££££££££££££ and to see them being ripped apart is sickening are we all forgetting what the humble racing pigeon done for us during the war saved thousands of lives yeah do a we bit of research on pigeon in the war you’ll get your eyes opened.

        Like

  124. anon says:

    Get a big ladder up there,send up the university principal,help said chick,replace when strong,when collared by the long arm of the law for interfering ,show the magistrate the film footage,call for large student demo banners with free the uni laird, conditional discharged then loads of publicity everyone wants to study Nottingham,master stroke.

    Like

  125. Pip says:

    If intervening would be illegal then I understand the reasons for not doing so. It is still utterly heart-breaking just literally watching the life drain away from this third chick though.

    Like

  126. dave cropper says:

    It will be interesting to see if she lays another clutch of eggs this spring if she loses her last chick as seems likely.

    Like

  127. julie907 says:

    im not sure that intervention is possible and could put the fate of the strongest at stake. The weaker one is hardly moving and didnt feed earlier while the stronger one had all. Mum did appear to be eating one of the dead ones, thats nature sadly. If they manage to raise one out of this its a miracle. Well done to mum and dad for doing the best in really attrocious conditions.

    Like

  128. Hannah says:

    also contributing to the death of the chicks is the absence of the male. Watching the derby falcons and comparing the two sees the derby falcons swapping shifts and bringing food back. It seems to me this year that the nottingham falcon male isnt as interested as he should be? I watched these guys last year and i remember it being quite a good partnership but this year doesnt seem to be the same.

    Like

    • anon says:

      He is about,but a whole host of reasons could be preventing him being more active at the nest site.Fending of interlopers or last years young,prey will be harder to come by with the detrimental weather,thereby spending longer than usual hunting away at distance from the nest,.Also is there any new building work going on nearby that could put him on edge too.He may be soliciting another falcon on another nest,it has been recorded before of a tiercel copulating with 2 falcons rearing different broods.food for though.

      Like

    • Lynne says:

      I agree with Hannah. I’ve been watching from the start, and I don’t think Mr. P. has looked half as intereted in this year’s enterprise as last. He certainly hasn’t contributed as much as Mrs. has. Are we sure that it is the same male? After all, 10 years is an awful long time for the same pair to have remained together, given the natural mortality rate.

      Like

  129. JayJay says:

    Now, as much as i agree with nature taking its course. At some stage someone will have to ring the remaining chick/s. Can’t the weak chick be removed and placed under U/V and hand fed to get its strength back then replaced when both parents are away ?

    Like

  130. anon says:

    there you go,tiercel there now feeding the last youngster its deceased sibling.

    Like

  131. Ian Fretwell says:

    First of all the times given on here are one hour out!! well its 9.58am now and Mr P is eating one of the chicks, there is just one chick alive now.

    Like

  132. anon says:

    i cant believe the 3rd chick is still drawing breath and no ones willing to step into help it,and no its not an anthropomorphism from me. So called ICONIC species but no help for it now.

    Like

  133. Pip says:

    There are two alive but the one lying down is barely there.

    Like

  134. Ian Fretwell says:

    Mr P has just gave the remaining chick a really good feed , of one of the dead chicks! I think this chick will survive, now hes geting all the food.

    Like

  135. Tom F says:

    Contrary to what I was saying yesterday I now think that we should intervene. We should start by drawing up some sort of roster of who will sit on the chicks and for how long. I dont mind late mornings and early evenings but I certainly dont want to be on that ledge after dark! Im just a simple country boy so dont feel safe in town after hours. I am however very good at catching pigeons so dont mind helping out in that respect?

    Joking aside…it is incredibly sad to see but as someone mentioned yesterday is happening all over the place at this time of year. We are lucky through modern technology to catch a glimpse of nature at its best and unfortunately at its worst. Lets not play god hey

    Like

  136. Malcolm says:

    Is chick number 3 still clinging to life? I am sure I see his bill opening occasionally. If so it can’t be long can it?

    Like

  137. karen says:

    so sad just one chick left now

    Like

  138. Ian Fretwell says:

    Are you sure the third is alive Pip i cant see it breathing/moving ?

    Like

  139. Pip says:

    It was definitely alive ten minutes ago, yes. I’m torn between wanting to watch to check on the remaining healthy chick, and now wanting to watch because it is distressing watching yet another chick fading away. We all know this is natural but that doesn’t mean we are obliged to enjoy it or be blasé about it (as some almost seem to be suggesting we be).

    Like

  140. i think we are goimg to loose another chick,sad very sad,its still breathing but very very weak,thought something coukd be done to save it,havnt seen the male for a while

    Like

  141. anon says:

    Before i go to work,one last thought.The 3rd chick now looks dead but was alive just an hour ago.The remaining live chick is also not looking good,its cheeping away because its chilling rapidly and should be covered by an adult by now before it also weakens and dies?? maybe the adults can sense a lost cause?? and are looking like they are going to abandon the nest site??

    Like

  142. looks like a third chick has passed on,cant any one help the last chick?

    Like

  143. Wendy says:

    Really don’t think I can keep watching this. I know it’s natures way but it’s so heart breaking. It’s like Mr and Mrs P are on the verge of giving up. I also noticed the third chick move it’s beak a while back but I think it has gone now, so, so sad …..

    Like

  144. juli says:

    It’s so sad, I can hardly bear watching. But survival of the fittest and all that.

    Like

  145. Pip says:

    The adult isn’t brooding the last chick properly, doesn’t bode well.

    Like

  146. juli says:

    maybe they will be able to lay some more eggs if the last chick dies, or is it too late in the season now?

    Like

  147. cant some one take the last alive chick ans save it?,i know its nature to loose some chicks but i rather see one survive than none at all,please help it.

    Like

  148. Stephanie Fowler says:

    Oh boy I can hardly watch but watch I will because it is such a privilege. Game over I guess, but there is always next year and then all the chicks they have successfully raised. I saw the Dutch website and their nest box looks much better … how about some shelter for next year’s brood?

    Like

  149. andy says:

    looks like the last chick is struggling ,hope it dont go the same way as the others…..

    Like

  150. Ian Fretwell says:

    111.25 and Mr P is back with a large kill, tryining to feed the chic, but the chics so full from the last feed , he doesnt want any, and is fast asleep!

    Like

  151. Ian Fretwell says:

    Why is the time one hour behind on this site please ?

    Like

  152. Shirley Stirland says:

    11.24 male returned with food but chick showed no interest and he left.Just a matter of time I don,t think I want to see the outcome 😦

    Like

  153. sarah says:

    Just seen the mother fly off with some sort of carcass, could this be one of the chicks that were lost ?

    Like

  154. justme says:

    Thanks to everyone for keeping me filled in just returned from work to see how things are going. I do think a roof for the next box is desirable, while chicks have been raised in the past, they havent this year and the weather could be the same next year. We have encouraged nature by building a nestbox surely we can make it a drier one.

    Like

  155. chris morley says:

    bin reading comments lot of folk saying ITS JUST NATURE we should not interfere!!! we have been interfering with nature for years,if it wasnt for us there would be lots of birds of prey about,only of late they have made a comeback,we now see buzzards,sparrowhawks,every day also kestrels,kites even saker falcons are about and if your really lucky goshawk now we are going back to the old ways,but whats the diffrence re-into kites,sea eagles and helping peregrines or any other b-o-prey we should help all we can to try to make up for past wrong-doings once the balance is restored i am sure NATURE will take over till then we should do all we can me thinks

    Like

  156. HisWhisper says:

    Both parents at nest box… 4th is eating good! 🙂

    Like

  157. JayJay says:

    Looking good for the 4th chick. Its look bright and healthy and as we speak its having a good crop full from the male. Happy Days. A nice lunch of pigeon washed down by a nice big fat juicy kip under his mum hopefully :-))

    Like

  158. jon says:

    Sad day looking like 1 chick left.also I found 1 dead adult at bt tower in birmingham this morning .4 eggs now 2 so i am told .there Is still a Falcón about but sadly eggs are no longer in a clutch in nest site

    Like

  159. RickG says:

    Been watching the peregrins for yrs now and am gutted for the 2 chicks shes lost but having watched todais live stream 1/5/12 i must say am abit worried about the 3rd chick as that one dont seem to have moved since yesyerday, i do hope this is not the case, i watch a pair that nest near where i live and they only have 1 chick every yr.

    Like

  160. Stephanie Fowler says:

    Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh. Just saw Mr & Mrs food process that last kill in seconds and Mrs P busy shoveling it down their chick. How could I have doubted their abilities! Great stuff.

    Like

  161. not seen mr p for two days has anyone ? lets hope the last chick makes it

    Like

  162. rosytoes says:

    I’m sorry to see these Peregrine Falcons struggling in this terrible weather. The last time I looked at the Webcam it seemed as though she/he wasn’t covering the chicks very adquately and one has to wonder why.

    Like

  163. Dorothy Newbery says:

    I am so pleased that so many people care and take an interest. After Mum’s dedication I hope the
    last chick survives.

    Like

  164. Chris Golightly says:

    Probably because she knows they stand very little chance.
    Maybe the cameras should be turned off now ?

    Like

    • Rachel says:

      I have to disagree I think the cameras should be left as they are. Many people have been watching these fantastic birds from the start and whatever the outcome will want to see what happens, good or bad – thats just nature….

      Like

  165. lynn says:

    has the parent suffered some beak damage??

    Like

    • jon says:

      The Bird in Birmingham had beak dammage but no other visible dammage.awaiting a pick up of dead falcon,maybee somebody shall take a Look at cause of death

      Like

  166. niceguynotts says:

    was good to see the male finally come back with some food for the chicks yesterday afternoon. just hope this weather improves soon. i personally think the cameras should keep going as distressing as it is as it is natural at the end of the day. but understand why others wouldn’t.

    Like

  167. Louise says:

    I struggle to see how we can sit back and not intervene, then call this nature when the council are currently chopping down trees and hedge rows for the next phase of the tram system with no concern for the wildlife it affects. We should be providing a canopy to protect the birds from the terrible weather we have experienced lately, throw in food when the male is away for long periods, and even took the chicks away and hand reared them, when we knew they were struggling. I appreciate there are laws to protect them from humans intervening so if thats the case, remove the cameras and the artificial nest box and signage. People say its just mother nature to ease their conscience, but the reality is that humans intervene with mother nature all the time when it suits us for our needs, so why can’t this be the case for the good of these birds?

    Like

    • niceguynotts says:

      fair comment we do destroy enough of natures habitat (like where the trams going) so yes why not help where we can too!!!

      Like

  168. chris morley says:

    i note a few folk are confusing him en her ,if they are not together,she is much bigger,best way i find is to look at tail feathers females normally have a white line at the very edge its easy to pick up with scope,it works for me,cause they are very alike which is not the norm with birds of prey normally the male are a lot more colorfull bit like humans really lol

    Like

  169. Ian Fretwell says:

    17.50 the chicks just had a really god feed aagain off Mr P!

    Like

  170. Lesley says:

    Pure motherly dedication! I wish them all well and hope the remaining chick moves onto a healthy life after a wet and windy start. I hope both Mum & Dad go on to have more chicks next year!!

    Like

  171. jon says:

    a lot of people seem very concerned about loosing 2 babys what about the thousands of birds perergrins and other b o p kill ????

    Like

  172. dean says:

    mrp just brought supper

    Like

  173. Charlie. says:

    Mother has just fed remaining chick (20.00GMT).. Had a good feed herself(typical woman) then flew off with the remains of the carcase..Chick is looking far stronger, but has just cuddled up to the body of its sibling.

    Like

  174. Charlie. says:

    P.S. Her beak doesnt look damaged at all,She was using it to tear the carcase apart.

    Like

  175. joanne says:

    mum feeding chick now and keeping her warm dad been back twice tonight things are getting better

    Like

  176. noel murray says:

    what about the birds they eat spare a thought for them and there chicks

    Like

  177. Kerry says:

    Well what a wonderful site to wake up to mum is feeding chick and both look healthy!!

    Like

  178. paul friend says:

    6.08am chick feeding well and a full crop. both parents brought food to scrape

    Like

  179. betty_boo says:

    Baby looks ok this morning. Mr/Mrs P had food at the nest but i missed baby feeding, lets hope baby had plenty to eat before i got here.

    Like

  180. Ed says:

    Will they remove the bodies of the dead young?

    Like

  181. Linda van der Westhuyzen says:

    I sincerely hope the last little chic survives – my friend and I have named him Ricky 🙂

    Like

  182. simon says:

    I dont believe a roof over the nest box would be a solution to the problem we’ve seen this year. The weather at the weekend was coming from the east to north east, which is the direction the nest is exposed. Protection is only offered, by the building itself, from the prevailing wind which is generally from the west to south west, I dont think there would be a problem if that was the direction from which the weather came.

    Like

  183. Mark says:

    I think the atrocious weather conditions combined with the poor construction of the nest platform has been the biggest factors in the chicks demise. A more box like protective structure affording protection from 3 sides and protection from above to prevent the platform getting soaked together with a deeper pea gravel layer is worth consideration for the future. Look at some of the other nest structures eg. Chichester and Derby peregrines for some ideas.
    Good luck to the remaining chick though.

    Like

  184. chris morley says:

    think we should put roof on,but please dont DO ANYTHING like derby

    Like

    • Donna says:

      The chick is in a corner on his own bobbing up and down and mum isn’t keep him warm. Why would this be? Is this normal behaviour?

      Like

  185. Linda vdW says:

    I hope things are going to be okay – looks like the chic is not under the mother but sitting in the corner 😦

    Like

  186. dean says:

    is mrs p keeping wrong chick warm

    Like

    • Donna says:

      You may be right, she’s flown off the now and you can see that she was sitting on the body of the dead chick!

      Like

  187. malc says:

    the mother is sitting on the last dead baby poor thing

    Like

  188. dean says:

    glad to see mrs pasgot the chick out the courner

    Like

  189. Linda vdW says:

    Nice to see Mom has brought some grub home 🙂

    Like

  190. reveshi says:

    and now keeping chick warm

    Like

  191. reveshi says:

    ooops… she’s gone again

    Like

  192. Eddie says:

    Looking at the comments about the death of the chicks I think people need a reality check. Chick mortality is a part of the nature of peregrines. They live in a harsh world. Peregrines and their chicks have been treading the tight rope of survival for millenia. Weather and choice of eyrie are only two of a myriad of factors that decide who survives and who dies young. It is all part of what has made peregrines what they are. You might also care to reflect that much of the food brought to the eyrie by the parents will have been birds with young to feed themselves and as time progresses they will also be killing young birds just fledged, its a life and death world with no time for sentimentality.

    Then all of a sudden we put a web cam on them to look into their world and are horrified when we see something that we as humans in our cosy houses don’t like and we feel terrible and demand something is done. Far worse still, they then turn the cameras off!! God forbid we actually get to see the true full nature of life as a peregrine, it should be sanitised and sensored!

    Peregrines to many (myself included) are one of the most incredible creatures that we share our planet with, so lets understand them and the lives they live properly and not through rose tinted filters. Those that sensored the web cam should reflect on their decision.

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Hi there – thanks for the comment. As we said in a previous blog entry, thankfully the cameras were only down whilst the team had a discussion about whether it would be possible or advisable to remove the dead chicks. We also wanted to organise a message for the front page to warn people that there were dead chicks in the nest – a very sensible decision considering that a number of schools were likely to log onto the camera.

      Like

  193. Dorothy says:

    Mum has just flown off with the last dead chick, leaving the last live one on its own for the moment

    Like

  194. ryan says:

    just moved last chick at 2 07 oclock

    Like

  195. Lorraine says:

    If the last chick does not survive is it early enough / likely for the parents to lay again this year?

    Like

  196. Shirley Stirland says:

    so glad last chick is doing well.please don,t give him/her a name,mighty fine Peregrine chick is more than enough,they aren,t our pets are they?

    Like

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