A quick thank you to our dedicated falcon followers

The remaining peregrine chick in the nest box

The remaining peregrine chick in the nest box

We wanted to take this moment, in the midst of what has been an extremely difficult few days, to thank all of our blog visitors for their overwhelming support. We have been quite literally inundated with comments from people from across the UK – and further afield – who have been glued to our falcon cam and blog since the weekend’s terrible storms.

Many of you have been providing an ongoing record of events as they unfold in the nest box and people have been asking many questions relating to the birds’ health, habits and environment. Please bear with us, we publish comments to the blog as quickly as possible, but obviously can’t respond directly to each and every one that comes through.

It’s quite clear just how much these magnificent birds have captured your hearts and we feel extremely privileged to have been able to share such spectacular – although sometimes upsetting – footage with you.

Sadly, we have lost our third chick now, and so just the one remains in the nest box. However, this in itself – considering the horrendous weather we had on Sunday – is a truly inspirational story, and we really hope that the final chick continues to grow and will eventually fledge the nest successfully.

The signs are, at this stage, looking promising, as the chick has been feeding very well, with both Mr and Mrs P have been making regular appearances with food. We will monitor its progress closely, and we know that you will too.

Thank you once again for your really kind words of support and encouragement, it has been much appreciated.

Dave Rogers
Nottingham Trent University

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161 Responses to A quick thank you to our dedicated falcon followers

  1. Malcolm says:

    Well done Dave and all concerned for the work with the camera’s and the website. Not exactly the outcome we would have hoped for but the remaining chick is going to be well fed. Will follow with interest.
    Kind Regards, Malcolm

    Like

  2. Anonymous says:

    As an avid “viewer” for a few years now I can honestly say it has been a total privelege to be able to do so. As has been said before definitely not the outcome we would have hoped for this year but to still have 1 remaining chick, who for the moment appears healthy and well, is a fantastic acheivement in spite of everything they have endured this year. Mrs P is such a good Mummy…..I find it incredible and amazing that they just instintively know how to do it and generally do it so well. Good Luck with Chick No. 4 Mr and Mrs P, it has been and always will be a total pleasure to watch. And very grateful thanks to all the Team at NTU and of course NWT for allowing us to “peek” in at this amazing sight.

    For the record, should the chick be given a name as has been done before, I love the idea of Chick No 4 being called “Gloria”….(I will survive) 🙂 or failing that Hope or Faith I think.

    Like

  3. Sam Rice says:

    This is all very well and good,but the tragedy that has unfolded before our eyes could have been so easily avoided with just a bit of forethought .Peregrines nesting in our cities is a relatively new thing and adequate nest sites in those cities and towns are few and far between, so we must do our utmost to provide them with the best nesting structure we can at all times.

    Like

    • Joy says:

      I find your comment rather harsh, this is nature in the real

      Like

      • Katie Carlin says:

        I agree, after all the falcons have actively chosen this site themselves, we did not force them to be here, we are simply fortunate that they are so we can see into their world.

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      • Tom F says:

        I agree with Joy? This is not a tragedy on our part Sam?????? Its a perfectly natural event? Are we ignorant / arrogant enough to believe that Peregrines only nest where we provide them with one? Can I suggest some light reading for you with emphasis on the section on ‘reproduction’

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peregrine_Falcon#Reproduction

        Anyway I digress! I refuse to believe that this experience can yet be determined as a tragedy nor a failure. Even the raising of one falcon chick is a cause for celebration.

        .

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      • SueAtt says:

        I agree with Joy. What we witnessed on Sunday was our very unpredictable changing climate and Mother Nature at her very worst! Lets just be thankful that the strongest chick has managed to survive and hope that he/she continues to do so with Mr and Mrs P’s dedication. Also a big thankyou to the NTU and NWT teams for enabling us to watch the highs and the lows of these wonderful birds.

        Like

    • Louise says:

      We can only learn and progress through experience. No one was to know this would happen, the pair have been perfectly fine at this site for years. However, yes in future a nesting box with more cover should be used due to this experience. I wish the remaining chick all the hope in the world.

      Like

      • jc says:

        Just a quick thought. I’m told that when the falcons were 1st discovered, they were given a nest box with a ‘roof’ and refused it, continuing to lay their eggs in Newtons drain which they were subsequently washed down by the rain. They only started using the box when there was no roof or hut-like structure, so trying to introduce one now would be taking a step backwards.

        Perhaps someone from NTU could confirm?

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      • daventu says:

        Hi. Yes, a nest box with a roof was trialled many years ago but the falcons didn’t take to it and chose to ignore it. Very early on when they first arrived – before we created a nest box for them – they also laid their eggs in the gutter and so consequently these were washed away, which is why we installed the tray style box we have today.

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      • Sam says:

        If this is the case, the dilemma is do we leave things as they are and hope next year for better whether conditions for the breeding falcons or do we provide them with better cover?I know where I stand in that they need better protection from the elements.I would have liked to have seen four young peregrines above the skies of our city again instead of one,I don’t know but to me its a no brainer.As for reading material I am very well read with regards to peregrine falcons.

        Like

  4. Steve says:

    Re a name – I thought of Tyson – coz he’s a real fighter 🙂

    Like

  5. Jill Cox says:

    Just like to say thank you for allowing us watch these amazing and beautiful birds. I have shed so many tears since sunday but am so pleased this little one is feeding well and hope it goes on to fledge fly high and free. Its a truly precious baby, to truly special parents.

    Like

  6. fiona says:

    Thank you to all involved for giving myself and my children a wonderful chance to really get to grips with the impact of climate variations on wildlife. One of the comments my seven year old made was what happens to all the other birds? When we saw a nest in our garden devastated by a pair of magpies last week she related that it was hard living wild in England. She now realy has ambition to work with bird and animal conservation and will be joining our local wildlife watch group for starters. Thank you for the unsanitised footage, the wisdom on wildlife and the hope that it gives us all. We love the idea of Gloria!

    Like

  7. Kazzabuzza says:

    Thanks for allowing so many people around the world to share in this experience. I’ve been an avid follower for the first time this year and after seeing the 4 chicks feeding on Friday I was extremely saddened to realise that 3 had perished during the last few days. To see the remaining chick feeding and being cared for by its parents after all they’ve been through is amazing and helps to remind me that nature is something we could all take more time to appreciate and understand. All the best now for the next part of their journey. Thanks again.

    Like

  8. Karen says:

    Having only found out about the falcons yesterday we watched in amazement last night for the first time. It is truly wonderful to have this up close view of the natural world with its highs and lows! Sad at times but also utterly fascinating too. What a wonderful job mum and dad are doing! Let’s hope luck is on their side now! My daughters have both gone into school this morning spreading the word so there will soon be lots more children intrigued by this wonderful sight. Many thanks to all those involved.

    Like

  9. Julie says:

    Considering the conditions the female was having to contend with on sunday it’s a wonder she survived as well as the one remaining chick! Thanks for your honest and thought provoking info on the blog and, as Fiona mentioned, the uncensored transmission of the webcam. It’s a reminder of the life and death struggles going on all around us,of which those of us who are lucky enough to have wild birds visit our gardens will be well aware. Keep up the good work! (and NWT ofcourse).

    Like

  10. Claire says:

    Thank you NTU & The Wildlife Trust! I have live stream on all day totally gripped since the start and I haven’t experienced so many emotions in years, I hope cameras will be on next year. Many thanks.

    Like

  11. Tom F says:

    Keep up the good work guys and gals! However as a self-employed individual my productivity has declined somewhat since discovering this site!!!!

    Like

  12. Tracey says:

    Just want to say THANKYOU, i’ve watched this nest for the last 3 years & have enjoyed the highs & the lows. I know from reading the information provided a lot of work went into choosing the site & the weekends loss would probably still have happened if the nest had been in a quarry, my thoughts are with all the team, Reality TV as it should be 😀

    Like

  13. Ann Amos says:

    And a huge ‘thank you’ from me also to everyone in the team who have allowed us to share this amazing experience…… Annie

    Like

  14. ann says:

    Oh no she is sitting on the wrong chick

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  15. Steve says:

    Mrs P went off for a break and Tyson/Gloria went walkout and got himself trapped in the corner of the box. Poor parent is trying to keep him warm but it’s a bit difficult with the chick wedged in the corner !

    Like

    • Steve says:

      Oh dear – this isn’t good. Parent (Mr P? – I’m not sure) has gone back to nuturing the dead chick while Tyson/Gloria languishes in the corner like a naughty schoolboy.

      Like

  16. Maurice says:

    worringly the parent bird is sitting on the dead chick and the remaining chick has managed to walk to the corner of the box, hopefully it will make its way back soon!

    Like

  17. Penny says:

    Whoops – cheeky chick has escaped from under Mum and got into a corner! Mum seems a bit confused and has resorted to trying to brood the dead chick instead. Chick 4 is very lively and vocal which can only be a good thing after all it has been through.

    Like

  18. fiona says:

    The surviving chick has now wandered onto the corner of the box and mum is brooding the body of chick 3, live chick making a din for attention, parent looking a bit confused. Hope parent bird realises soon!

    Like

  19. Katie Carlin says:

    Very curious as to what the little chick is up to in the corner of the nest box. Looks like he/she is on a time out and having a bit of a tantrum, though more likely they can’t turn themselves around having fallen into the corner, mum tried to cover but they wouldn’t stop fidgeting so she gave up.

    Like

  20. Maurice says:

    Well hopefully Mr.P will return with some food and the confusion will be over.. now I cant work until this is sorted 😦

    Like

    • fiona says:

      Maurice, you and me too! tried keeping it on audio in background but just too curious!

      Like

    • BlueEyes says:

      Snap Maurice, I can’t work untill this is sorted. I think it is Mr P that is sitting on the dead chick. When he was sat on the ledge, he had his foot up. Must be injured. I think personally he is an unexperienced parent. I bet Mrs P will give him what for when she returns. Happy viewing:)

      Like

      • SueAtt says:

        Yes – pretty sure it is Mr P – he did get up at one point and try to sit on No. 4, but gave up and went back to the dead chick. No 4 very vocal and Mr P keeps giving him/her a look, but seems very confused! Just an observation as I am no expert, but I have seen Mr P with his foot up quite often over recent weeks when he has been on the ledge, and assumed that this is just a resting position?

        Like

    • Tom F says:

      ha ha I know that feeling!

      Like

  21. Claire says:

    Who controls the movable camera? just wanted a name(s) to say well done.

    Like

  22. Maurice says:

    \O/ Dads back and wrestled the chick away from corner with some careful manouvering.. 🙂 back to work

    Like

  23. Steve says:

    Well Mrs P is on the case now and has man (woman) handled the chick out of the corner. She obviously knows what she’s doing – unlike Mr P (bless him)

    Like

  24. SueAtt says:

    Problem resolved – Mrs P back and sorted No 4 quickly, even if it seemed a little on the rough side!

    Like

  25. Parent back now and got chick under control, I like the name Robinson Crusoe cos he weathered the storm

    Like

  26. Maurice says:

    ahh ok, well done Mrs.P 🙂 but should’ve left the dead chick where it was and not pulled it into the corner awell.. oh well

    Like

  27. fiona says:

    Eeeee that were grand, drama averted, now back to work!

    Like

  28. hedgeypig says:

    Poor Mrs P doesn’t look too comfortable with her tail hanging out over the edge of the box. What this woman has put up with she so deserves for that chick to fledge

    Like

    • Helen A-F says:

      She’s a true trooper. That little chick has so many hopes resting upon its shoulders but with all those willing it to fledge and the full attentions of the parents, I guess there is every hope to be optimistic 🙂

      Like

  29. Helen A-F says:

    I have watched the story of these beautiful birds unfold, over the past weeks, in absolute awe. Sad as it was to witness three of the chicks perish, it was truly amazing to watch the efforts of the female peregrine to protect her young, with such dedication and spirit. Her motherly instincts have been rewarded with her surviving, strong chick, a true little fighter and survivor. Thank you to Notts Wildlife Trust and to NTU for allowing us to share these wondeful images of the natural world. I have noted comments and criticims over the past couple of days, which I consider undeserving and unfair and I wanted to say you have my full support in the decisions you made and in all you do. My daughter is studying wildlife conservation at NTU, Brackenhurst campus and she will be joining Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust over the coming days. You are all an inspiration in the work you do although I have to say you have been outdone by Mrs P, who has taught us all what true dedication truly is 😉 May the surviving chick continue to thrive and I look forward to watching the progress of this beautiful peregrine family over the coming days and weeks.

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Thank you for your kind words! And great to hear that your daughter is studying wildlife conservation here at NTU!

      Like

  30. PamUK says:

    I have been meaning to mention that the measurement chart at the back of the nest is useful for understanding the size of the peregrines. We may tend to forget while looking at the webcam that these are in fact BIG birds. An adult peregrine can have a wingspan of 90 – 100 cms. and for those that still don’t like metric (like me) that is a wingspan of up to approximately 40inches wide.

    Like

    • Ben says:

      The chart also helps viewers to identify whether it’s the male or female on the nest, with the female being significantly bigger.

      Like

  31. mary from Arnold says:

    how has the baby managed to get into the corner?

    Like

  32. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    Although there seems to be flies being more promanant around the nest I was happy to see the remaining chick alive and very well, trying to steal food from its mother and most deternined not to be covered, this surely must be a goos sign

    Like

  33. Keith says:

    Many thanks to all concerned for bringing us a look into these birds lives,sad and upsetting as it has been over the last few days,hopefully the one chick remaining will go on to grow up as good as it`s parents.It`s not all gloom though,to anyone interested take a look at the RSPB ones at Chichester and Manchester and also Simon Kings Wildlife Whisperer ones at Charring Cross Hospital on their web sites, all of them seem to be doing quite well.

    Like

  34. Steve says:

    This last chick is going to make it…. Mr P has just been feeding it…. Poor little mite is stuffed … no more dad perleeeease!

    Like

  35. Tracey says:

    The chick likes it in the corner!

    Like

  36. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    I have just watched the Female Peregrin dispose of the third dead chick,

    Like

    • Stuart. Nottingham says:

      I think this answers any questions about removal of the other bodys

      Like

    • fiona says:

      Just missed that….good, maybe the male will not get so confused next time it’s his turn to brood. I think the chick goes to the corner as it’s something to feel close to when mum’s not around!

      Like

    • SueAtt says:

      Oh, thank goodness – no more confusion for Mr P as to which chick should be kept warm!

      Like

  37. Dee says:

    Just seen chick 3 being removed from the nest, will be less distressing to watch now, didn’t like seeing mrs p trying to brood the dead chick earlier.

    Like

  38. Steve says:

    Mr P is back, trying to brood the chick in the corner and making a pig’s ear of it. Come back mum, all is forgiven!

    Like

  39. SueAtt says:

    Oh no – Mr P’s got No 4 wedged up against the side of the nest box. He really does have a lot to learn bless him – hope Mrs P gets back soon!

    Like

  40. Shelley says:

    Thank you all so much for this wonderful experience. The way that you have managed the news of tragic turn of events over the past few days is exceptional. Lets hope the remaining chick goes from strength too strength now. Like many other people I am glued to the web cam it is truly inspirational.

    Like

  41. Sue says:

    Is this Dad trying to protect the chick in the corner? Let’s hope Mum gets back soon as dad seems to be squashing him a bit ….

    Like

  42. fiona says:

    Amazing differences between male and female parenting. Is this defiantly the same male as before? seems a bit confused by this brooding malarkey! Whereas mum just moved the chick our of the corner no nonsense like, he seems confused that the chick is still there and hasn’t come out of it’s own acord. either not experienced or not the brightest star in the constellation!

    Like

  43. andy says:

    Well i think they should call the last remaining chick UNITY……………reasons being 1 its living on the uni building, 2 the unity that all us viewers have shown, and 3 because of all the dedication,devotion and unity that both the adult falcons have shown in bringing the little one safely through the last few days.

    Like

    • Sue says:

      Lovely – best suggestion so far (and covers boy/girl question!). I haven’t been able to stop watching since Sunday and am so grateful to all those involved in bringing us these wonderful, if at times traumatic, events.

      Like

      • Debbie Wiltshire says:

        For those who have not been following the Peregrine’s in Rochester, New York. They had an adult female called Unity that was sadly killed by a car a month ago. She had caught a large pigeon and she went to the ground as she struggled with it. Sadly the car driver didn’t see/care and she was killed. It would be amazing if her name lived on with this little one.

        Like

  44. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    How old does the chick get before stretching its wings and hoping about, and ready to leave the nest

    Like

  45. MikkinNotts says:

    A big thank you to Notts Wildlife Trust and to NTU for which must surely be the best quality resolution cameras, better than any other UK Peregrine cams that I have seen thus far. The remaining chick seems to be going from strength to strength, thank goodness. This must surely be chick No1 (hatched first) not No 4 as referred to above.

    Like

  46. julie907 says:

    Privileged to be able to have watched, absolutely gutted about the weekend events, but we have a life and that in itself is a miracle:-) Thank you for allowing us this insight and I hope it will continue for many years to come. Well done on all your hard work and good luck to the birds with the remaining chick and in future years.

    Like

  47. redtedng9 says:

    Just an amazing few days giving us a direct glimpse of the power of mother nature. The violent storm which as it carried on was relentless for twenty hours. The fierce maternal instinct of Mrs P doing everything in her power to protect her young .
    Lets all hope the surviving chick can thrive, and eventually fly off.
    All this in the centre of our city-fantastic.

    Like

  48. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    Do Peregrins pair for life and do the birds come back to the nest box each year

    Like

  49. Penny says:

    Wow – never has one tiny bird generated so much interest and discussion! After all the sadness, the joy that this little chick is bringing is wonderful, and I would like to add my thanks to all at the project team for affording us the opportunity to be part of this experience. By the way I love the name Unity, suggested earlier – it seems wholly appopriate given all the circumstances.

    Like

  50. Eileen says:

    A question for daventu, where do the peregrines take the carcases to when they have taken off as much as they can. I would also like to add my thanks to NTU and The Wildlife Trusts.for giving us an insight to the Lives of these Peregrines.

    Like

  51. Chitty says:

    I hope this isn’t too morbid but I missed Mrs P removing the dead chick. Is a screen grab possible?

    Like

  52. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    Its good to see this one remaining chick trying to feed its self when prey is presented to it, it seems Mum cannot get food into his/her mouth quick enough so he/she has a go for its self.
    He/she also has a srong load voice now to

    Like

  53. malc says:

    having watched the story unfold before our very eyes , i have been glued to my pc screen from just before the first chick hatched what an amazing story it has been , it would make a great book to read about ,
    but i do have to say some people need to detach themselfs from whats right for a wild falcon to what thay think is right for the falcon we can not interfear with nature its there world and we are just looking at it and what a privilage it is thank you to all involved .

    Like

  54. Sean Walsh says:

    Just reads Dave’s blog agree with most of it! but with climate change and the forecast of wetter springs guess it would not hurt to put a canopy over the nest for next year and as for naming the chick I go with Phil Collins, but phil for short (against all odds)

    Like

  55. Penny says:

    Good news from Norwich Cathedral where two chicks have successfully hatched today and both look very healthy!

    Like

  56. Deddajay says:

    This is my first post, but I have been glued to the screen for days. Thank you for taking the decision to keep the cameras rolling during the last few days – nature in the raw is fascinating, traumatic and life inspiring all at once. The basic problems of survival really put our human issues into perspective. I keep peeping at the web cam during working hours, but can’t keep up with the blog as blogs are blocked at work, so it’s good to catch up from home.

    I love the name Unity, by the way. The recent events have brought so many people together to share this experience.

    This has been a tragic situation, but really brings it home how our wildlife have to cope in our environment. Other sites seem to have had more luck this year, my local sites of Brighton and Chichester are doing well, and my home town of Norwich are still awaiting hatching. Norwich is possibly even more exposed than Nottingham so I’m glad that they are still at the egg stage at the moment.

    Keep doing what you are doing, Mr and Mrs P. You are wonderful.

    PS. At least with peregrines we don’t have to witness such a diversity of size in chicks. I’m also following a barn own family in Dorset and the smallest chick has already been canabalised by it’s older and bigger siblings.

    Like

  57. Christine says:

    9.25pm wednesday – looks like the parent is NOT sitting on the chick, it seems to be on the outside, hope this isn’t another ‘bad sign’, it can’t be that warm ??

    Like

  58. Christine says:

    6am – thursday – all seems well – phew ! What a roller coaster this is turning out to be

    Like

  59. Alison says:

    Now that everyone’s mood has lifted with the growing strength of chick number 4, can I add a frivolous name suggestion? What about Barry, after Barry Manilow – I made it through the rain? 🙂

    Like

  60. Sonya says:

    I was surprised to learn that some people have been able to get sound because I’ve never been able to, even with the volume turned up as far as it will go. Nevertheless, it’s been a wonderful opportunity to see nature in action and the picture quality is exceptional. I can see several rings in the nest from prey birds. Will NWT retrieve these after the chicks fledge? One of them is from a pigeon that I saw being fed to the chicks last week.

    Like

  61. Hetty says:

    I’ve never taken much interest in nature, but my boss sent me the link to this website a month or so ago, before the eggs arrived and I’ve been glued to it ever since, the wonderful sight of 4 eggs and the waiting for the chicks to hatch (I even put a reminder on my outlook calender when they were due) the joy at seeing 4 newly hatched eggs and heart break of the last week, what a ride!! Just proves, these birds are tough and loyal. Its a privaliged to see it all! Thanks Mr and Mrs P and chick! I think Unity is a great name btw Deddajay. Thanks Nottingham! Can’t wait for spring watch now!!

    Like

  62. kazzabuzza says:

    A name? How about Travis – ‘Why does it always rain on me?’ Just a thought.

    Like

  63. Lesley Farnsworth says:

    Have been away for afew days,so was so sorry to hear about the 3 chicks not surviving the awful weather . Will keep my fingers crossed that the surviving chick thrives well now with full attention from parents.

    Like

  64. Steve says:

    He’s been naughty again…. off in the corner he goes!

    Like

  65. Sue says:

    It must be even more difficult to stay warm if you’re a lone chick. Hope he’s not left alone for long …..

    Like

  66. Steve says:

    Now being fed by Mr P. Father and baby are doing well!

    Like

  67. Maurice says:

    I’ve been wondering why he keeps going into the corner, do you think he feels more secure there, now his siblings are gone. They certainly used to support each other when they were huddled in a ball, before all the turn of events!

    Like

  68. Sally says:

    I’m so pleased to see the remaining chick looking very strong and growing at such an alarming rate. I like the name Unity but also Solo might be appropriate as many of us were feeling that way after the sad news following the weekend’s weather.

    Like

  69. Carl says:

    Is the female bigger than the male? I can’t work out which is which!

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Hi Carl – In general terms the best way to tell the male and female apart is by their size. The female is considerably larger than the male – as much as a third larger in fact. Clearly – when looking at one bird at a time the size comparison is not such a useful characteristic, but as well as being smaller overall males birds tend to have a more slender look and females can often have bolder, more striking markings.

      Like

  70. hedgeypig says:

    I think Mr P is fancying himself as a penguin with the chick sat on his feet

    Like

  71. Sue says:

    Compared with the photo on the blog of the single chick (looking a bit dishevelled!) Unity looks much stronger and bigger now. It’s difficult to believe how quickly she’s grown, but great to see her tottering about.

    Like

  72. Steve says:

    Another name suggestion – Jack (Little Jack Horner sat in the corner) 🙂

    Like

  73. Eileen says:

    I notice the female has alonger hook to her beak

    Like

  74. JustMyself says:

    I think he should be called Chesney (The One and Only) lol

    Like

  75. John says:

    Chesney Hawkes…..very good.

    Like

  76. julie907 says:

    Ugh rain, mum taken chicky to the far top corner bless them

    Like

  77. PamUK says:

    Once again it is very wet and very cold and I for one am sick of this awful weather. The poor Peregrine sits with wet feathers over the chick who is partly exposed to the elements and appeared to be shaking with cold when I looked in. Has anyone seen a feed today?

    Like

  78. justme says:

    i cant make my mind up if the chick is shivering or Mr/Mrs P(still cant figure out who is who) but they certainly dont look very comfortable at all

    Like

  79. daddysgirl says:

    I think the last chick should be named Hope.

    Like

  80. Steve says:

    Just tuned in to see Mr P arrive with breakfast. Unfortunately, Mrs P is obscuring the view of the chick. Just move to the left a little mum!

    Like

  81. justme says:

    just arrived home from work…little chick is having a decent lunch….i think a little indigestion is on the way! Why can i not seem to find hardly any comments anymore or has everybody gone away and im talking to myself!!!!

    Like

    • Alison says:

      I’ve not gone away so you not talking to yourself, but I too had wondered where everyone had gone. For me it’s a great way to check up on the days events and to check that all is well and that Mr & Mrs P have been seen and that baby has been fed.

      Like

  82. Helen A-F says:

    Feed just now…chick looking very healthy 🙂

    Like

  83. Tracey says:

    Am i the only one who checks the cameras before i go to bed to see how things are?, when it started to rain heavily again & became windy yesterday, i had a feeling of dread but to see the chick still being protected & fed today is great news, this year has certainly been one of highs & lows, great work done by Dave & team 😀

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Thanks 🙂

      Like

    • Helen A-F says:

      We always check them before we go to bed too. And as soon as we get up! 🙂

      Like

    • daddysgirl says:

      I check before bed aswell so no your not alone

      Like

    • Caroline says:

      You’re not the only one. I check before I go to bed, then toss and turn all night until I can check again in the morning! Then I turn on the computer with a real sense of fear and breathe a big sigh of relief to see the chick has got through another awful night.
      I took a couple of looks at this last year, but this year I’ve followed everything almost daily since the eggs were laid. I’m emotionally exhausted but have loved (although sometimes despairingly) every moment.
      Well done to everyone involved.

      Like

    • SueAtt says:

      I check every night before I go to bed and say ‘night night’, and turn the computer on as soon as I get up in the morning to make sure all is well.

      Like

  84. LJ says:

    He seems very taken with the other corner now. Looks like there’s something interesting behind the board 🙂 I hope the cable/pipe is secure!

    Like

  85. justme says:

    Thanks for that i always have the chick on last thing at night and as soon as i get home husband says im mad hes on his own agaain and being very noisy (chick not husband)…ive been watching the falcons from Chichester,,,very dry looking chicks and parents last night i might say…., , but ive never seen them alone perhaps i just look at the wrong times. Apparently more cold bad weather to come for the weekend.

    Like

  86. Keyworth Red says:

    Just had afternoon snack at 3.15, lets hope the weather is better than last week-end.

    Like

  87. Lynne says:

    I like Unity too. Just hope we don’t have to change the name to Adolf if it turns out to be a boy!
    It’s not just me that thinks the male might be a new one then? He’ll have had an abundance of experience after this year’s adventure alone!.

    Like

  88. Sue says:

    Unity seems to be tottering about on her elbows … is this normal, are her feet just not developed/strong enough yet or is there another reason?

    Like

  89. justme says:

    Just arrived home from work, lucky me, cant find any comments since yesterday afternoon, am i being incredibly stupid here, cant believe no one is looking…i think Derby have . hatched a chick

    Like

  90. shezzy says:

    Have been watching for a week now Im hooked. Have found quite a few websites with live web cams all over the world. Opened up a whole new hobby for me.Also watching the owls in Dorset.

    Like

    • Tracey says:

      Me too!! also the peregrines at chichester cathedral 😀

      Like

      • Caroline says:

        I’ve been watching three bald eagles in Decorah, Iowa since they were eggs. They’re getting pretty close to being ready to fly now (at least when I looked yesterday they were). With them and the falcons, I’m hooked on this now. Derby, Nottingham, Dutch and San Jose are the falcons I’m watching and also the Wildlife Whisper webcams. It’s all pretty addictive.

        Like

  91. Eileen says:

    Notice the female brings a bigger meal than the male,good job little uns getting a big appetite.

    Like

  92. kazzabuzza says:

    feed time!

    Like

  93. Chris Golightly says:

    I wonder if soon Peregrines wont go the way of urban foxes and become a pest!!

    Like

  94. SueAtt says:

    I was here yesterday but put my comments on the Brackenhurst Swallows blog – thought I was alone too!

    Like

    • Anne says:

      I put my comments on the swallows blog as well. Is there some way of having all the comments together? I’m completely ignorant about technology so have no idea whether it is possible.

      Like

      • justme says:

        i thought everyone had vanished too and i wondered why its not all on one blog…must be far too technical for me!!

        Like

  95. John says:

    Breakfast in the sunshine!

    Like

  96. Keyworth Red says:

    8.53am, Breakfast time, all looking well.

    Like

  97. Morag says:

    She looks so uncomfortable at times, trying to shelter the one, I don’t know how she’d have coped with four in this colder-than-usual weather. It’s lovely to see the remaining chick growing so fast.

    Like

  98. shezzy says:

    Mrs P not sitting on chick. He/she looks a bit poorly. Has beak down in the gravel.Mum looks very alert. Hope all is ok.

    Like

    • shezzy says:

      Oh he/she fine must have been deep sleep ..bless him/her.Having a stretch and heading for the corner.. again!

      Like

  99. Linda Dawson says:

    Watching with bated breath as the night time temperatures seem very low this bank holiday weekend, and now its raining too. What are the usual kinds of extremes that these nesting falcons endure? The female has my absolute admiration for tenacity and dedication, she must be cold sitting still all that time. I feel like a new mum again myself, notice that the real feathers are coming in amongst the fluffy white stuff and now am terrified the eyelas (correct term?) will fall off the ledge before it’s ready!! Oh dear, weaned from the ‘soaps’ many years ago and now Im addicted to this livecam.

    Like

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