Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust visit NTU to ring our falcon chick


Andrew Lowe, the West Notts Conservation Officer for the Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust, bought a team of experts to the NTU City site to ‘ring’ our soon-to be-named falcon chick. In this video you can see what they did and hear an explanation of the importance of them doing this. You might also be interested to read our previous blog about falcon ringing.

Camera: Jared Wilson
Editing and post production: John Anderson

Watch out for a new blog next week about other birds and wildlife being ringed around the NTU campus.

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91 Responses to Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust visit NTU to ring our falcon chick

  1. Lynne says:

    That was brilliant! Although clearly not best pleased to be mucked about, the chick was not in distress, and obviously recovered very quickly. A quick and efficient operation, and a privilege to be allowed to see it. Thank you!

    Like

  2. Claire says:

    Excellent, thanks!

    Like

  3. Sue says:

    Thank you so much for letting us see the ringing process. I’d watched last years via the you tube link earlier and was interested to see how our chick got on (we call him flumpy) – he seemed to cope very well! The handler (I’m assuming from the wildlife trust) was very professional and calm – a pleasure to watch such good conservation work.

    Like

  4. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    what can be said apart from amazing, Thanks. The chick looked far bigger than it does on the cams and clearly in no distress
    Again many thanks to all involved

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Thanks Stuart – yes, seeing him being handled helps to give a perspective on size doesn’t it

      Like

      • Stuart. Nottingham says:

        Indeed it does, we need more of these beautiful birds in the UK along with Kites and Harris
        and so many more that could take up the whole page ( Welbeck collage near Cresswell is a good place to spot Honey Buzzards )

        Like

  5. s dickins says:

    he can certain shout!

    Like

  6. Claire says:

    Is chick boy or girl??

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Hi Claire – we weighed the chick at the time of the ringing and are fairly certain that it is a male, although we can’t guarantee it

      Like

  7. Rob Wonder says:

    I’d like to congratulate all concerned in the NWT/NTU team for producing the best video coverage of all the current raptor offerings on the web.

    The technical quality, positioning and manoeuvrability of the cameras is obviously very important to the team involved allowing us to view in almost TV quality video.

    Like

  8. Ann Chapman says:

    I’ve so enjoyed seeing this whole process. It’s a privilege. Well done to you all!

    Like

  9. Christine says:

    It looked like a very efficient ringing and yes the chick has an excellent pair of lungs !! A big well done to all concerned

    Like

  10. Charles Jones says:

    Where has the Chick gone ? He was there this morning but didnt look big enough to Fly …Can i bring this to your attention also please? ( If not considered suitable for the Page, please delete it..
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-18183204

    Like

    • SueAtt says:

      Thanks for that Charles – made very interesting reading. I quite agree with what the RSPB are saying – totally unacceptable!

      Like

      • SW says:

        I echo what Sue has said – the issue needs to be widely publicised, it’s an unbelievable proposal.

        Like

    • Anne says:

      Thanks Charles. Completely agree with Sue & SW, this is a disgraceful proposal. The RSPB want us to contact our MP asking him to raise this with the minister Richard Benyon

      Like

  11. annie says:

    I was also worried, I thought it had gone on to the ledge and fallen off but the camera looked for it, the naughty little thing had jumped out of the nest and was under the wires of the camera. It has been jumping in and out nearly all afternoon., Just like a naughty child. I really want to thank the Wild life trust and the Uni for letting us watch all of this,it is quite addictive.

    Like

  12. PamUK says:

    Chick is in his corner and parent just flew away from the ledge.
    The ringing looked quick and efficient.
    Thank you for the video NTU.

    Has anyone seen or reported a feed today?

    Like

  13. Caroline says:

    Lovely to see the ringing process – thanks for that. I have to agree with Rob Wonder. I too have been watching several peregrine web cams in the UK and overseas and have also followed three bald eagles in Decorah, Iowa from egg to almost ready to fly off now. NTU camera is easily the best quality and although I love “my” bald eaglets, “my” little peregrine chick has stolen my heart (and my time) completely. He’s becoming a very handsome chap and I’ll be glued until he leaves. Thanks again for all the brilliant footage and the time those involved have put in to keeping us informed and answering all our questions. This is also one of the best blogs.

    Like

    • betty_boo says:

      Looks like out little chick is now a stroppy teenager and has no manners at all when food is given too him , he’s just snatched it away from parent without so much as a thank you. We know he really doesn’t mean it, I have never followed a blog like this but I have really enjoyed it my husband has too as its keeping me quiet so he can watch what he wants on TV while im in another room so I will say a big thank you from him

      Like

  14. PamUK says:

    Chick is leading camera person on a merry dance this morning LOL !!!

    Like

  15. Anny says:

    Thank you for the video – fascinating!

    Like

  16. Carl says:

    Why does the ring have the address of the British Museum?

    Like

    • Mark says:

      The explanation from the British Museum website is “Historically, the British Trust for Ornithology has used the address Brit Museum NH, London, SW7. This refers to the Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London and not the British Museum, which does not have any involvement in bird-ringing. This address was used because the words London and Museum are easily recognisable, even to those who do not speak English.”

      Like

  17. Sarah S. says:

    Lovely close up of the downy bits on his back, they look just like dandelion seeds!

    Like

  18. tommy says:

    oooh wont be long now hes running about flapping his wings!

    Like

  19. s dickins says:

    how long do you think it will be before he flies please? We are going on holiday on Thursday and will be devastated to miss it

    Like

  20. betty_boo says:

    Home Alone …

    Like

  21. Lynn says:

    Ah I see them… right down at the end of the ledge,surveying their kingdom 8.20 am on this lovely sunny morning. have a great day peeps 🙂

    Like

  22. But where’s the baby!!!

    Like

  23. Julie Mott says:

    Dad looking mystified as to where chick is

    Like

  24. Lynn says:

    My heart is in my mouth! if he fell would he be able to fly? I think not yet…..

    Like

  25. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    So good to see our intrepid hero out on the ledge This morning and spreading his wings,
    He is now begining to look like a Peregrin

    Like

  26. julie907 says:

    Just logged on and i notice that mum and chick are near the nest and dad is on the ledge. At the far end of the ledge there is what looks like a large bird, bit close if you ask me but now gonna watch,dunno if you can play vt back to see but thought i would blog it

    Like

  27. Nicola says:

    Very worried as to where the chick is!
    😦

    Like

  28. PamUK says:

    Both parents on the ledge. Chick has gone walkabout again, presumably beneath the webcam.

    Like

  29. Nicola says:

    Phew! So pleased he’s still there lol! 🙂

    Like

  30. PamUK says:

    I have not actually ever seen the chick on the upper left hand ledge where the parents land. He goes out of sight towards the cam. He was watching a parent on the ledge this morning and I wondered if he was about to hop up there but he went his usual route. Not seen a feed yet today although both adults were there earlier. Couple of new pics here:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/66339356@N00/sets/72157629524594786/detail/?page=3 (bottom of page)

    Like

    • Anne says:

      I saw him hop up there this morning Pam, he didn’t stay long & fortunately didn’t go near the edge. Needless to say I was panicking & very relieved when he went back to his normal route! More lovely pics, thank you

      Like

  31. julie907 says:

    Can somebody please check the vt from 11.50 ish this morning, I definitely saw mum and chick near nest and dad just up on the ledge… at the far end of the ledge there was definitely another large looking bird ? I did post earlier ..it was around 11.57 , then said bird vanished

    Like

  32. Julie Mott says:

    Chick went right to edge of ledge where parent was but parent coaxed it back to nest …… palpitations big time here !!

    Like

  33. SueAtt says:

    No sign of anyone at the moment – presumably chick is sleeping somewhere out of camera shot. Haven’t yet seen him out on the ledge with his parents – but not sure if I’m jealous of everyone else who has, or relieved because I’m not sure my nerves could stand it! :0

    Like

  34. freda says:

    All well now … chick feeding like many young ….as tho’ never been fed before!!
    Guess he will soon need that energy to fly …….

    Like

  35. Storm says:

    oh god hes off walkabout again. does he not realise what he does to us when he wonders around like this??

    Like

  36. Alison says:

    I have been checking nervously all day ever since I saw him on the ledge this morning and then didn’t see him all day! Thankfully he is now safely back in the nest 🙂

    Like

    • SueAtt says:

      Oh my goodness!! He just jumped onto the ledge – he was completely alone with no sign of mum or dad around!! He stood there for a short while looking out into the big wide world and then jumped back into the nest and flapped his wings like mad as if he was pretending to fly! Now gone back into his corner so at least I can breath again!!

      Like

  37. Sally says:

    I can’t get over how handsome the chick is now with his speckled breast and brown feathers. He seems to have matured so quickly these past few days and is starting to look like a proper peregrine now.

    Like

  38. PamUK says:

    I’ve been reading that fledging usually takes place at around 37- 42 days. 42 days for our chick would be around Sat. 2nd June if I have done my calculations correctly (maths is not my best subject). He is very busy this evening preening, pulling out the little white feathers that he can reach to let them fly away. In the evening light his colour really shows up. Glad to hear he had a good feed earlier, I missed that.

    Like

  39. Lynn says:

    Just seen him- under a load of machinery- way along the gully. Phew.

    Like

  40. Jan says:

    Attacking the hose now…

    Like

  41. PamUK says:

    Just logged on…..chick seemed to be trying to wreck the camera equipment. He appeared to have his claws stuck around the tube that looks like a hosepipe and was shaking the whole lot and getting his beak around where it shouldn’t be. Finally he got his foot off. A thought for next year is that maybe that area of he ledge should be blocked off as far as access by the chick is concerned. Hope he doesn’t wreck anything before he leaves.

    Like

  42. SueAtt says:

    What a naughty boy our Ernie Storm is! Been pecking at the cable and jumping all over it, and now posing on his lookout post as if to say “it wasn’t me”.

    Like

  43. Hetty says:

    I’ve not logged on to see him for two days and wowee he’s almost completely brown, he’s growing fast!!

    Like

  44. tommy says:

    When he eventually spreads his wings will he come back for a period of time?

    Like

    • PamUK says:

      Tommy, I have read that they do hang around the nest for a few days to still be fed by the parents until they learn to catch prey for themselves.

      Like

  45. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    When the birds finaley vacate the nest will the site be cleaned and made ready for next year ( hope we have cam feed then to )
    I think stronger coverings for the cam cables might be the order of the day to

    Like

  46. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    Our boy is out on the ledge again with Mom who is probably saying ” Look at the idiots down there
    they have to buy thier food with stuff they call money, because they have forgotten how to hunt”

    Like

  47. Caroline says:

    My heart is in my mouth!!!!! He’s running up and down the ledge flapping his wings. Someone get him back into the nest box quickly, please. Perhaps a big fence around the whole thing would help (help me, that is – not him).

    Like

  48. Rachel says:

    He’s liking that ledge now – he’s out for the count – he’s been doing plenty of running around today! Has anyone seen Mr & Mrs P today or many feeds – been watching every hour but must keep missing them – he needs a snack to get those wings nice and strong for his first take off which probably won’t be long now! my heart has been in my mouth a couple of times today when he’s been near the edge of the ledge!

    Like

  49. Stuart. Nottingham says:

    Our intrepid hero is keeping Mom and Dad very busy,
    Talk about fast food

    Like

  50. keithy says:

    How do we know what sex the baby falcon is ? and when will it take the first flight ? cos im scared to death !!!!

    Like

  51. Falconer says:

    What is the basis for the comment on the video linking persecution of Peregrine Falcons to falconers?

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Hi – thank you for your comment. Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust recognises that the vast majority of people involved in falconry pose no threat whatsoever to wild birds. Whilst appreciating that the reference to falconers/falconry in the video about the ringing has caused some distress to legitimate falconers we do not regarding it as mis-leading. To deny that chicks are ever taken for use in falconry would, however, be misleading. In our previous blog entries and media releases about the threats posed to chicks we have been acutely conscious of the need for balance and usually refer to people who take live chicks as thieves – this approach has resulted in positive feedback from the falonry community.

      Erin McDaid
      Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

      Like

  52. Awooga says:

    It is disappointing that a University is endorsing unfounded allegations regarding falconers and persecution of wild birds of prey. Many comments have been submitted to this blog highlighting the inaccuracy of the comments made by the Nottingham Wildlife Trust representative. It is a pity that a (hopefully) unbiast research institution has failed to convey to the general public the feeling of anger this comment has created amongst falconers. In fact it is falconers who have advanced the subject of captive breeding (both by natural pairings and AI) to the point where the knowledge gained is actively used to conserve and reintroduce threatened species to the wild (USA Peregrine crash, UK Red Kite reintroduction etc). Without the specialist work undertaken by falconers rehabilitating injured wild birds of prey in order to facilitate a successful release to the wild, many releasable wild casualties would either be confined to rescue centres or destroyed. While it is perfectly acceptable to voice an opinion, it is the responsibility of a large research organisation to make clear that these comments are unfounded and represent the opinion of the NWT. Comments providing examples and evidence of the vast experience and knowledge falconers and falconry has provided to the conservation and preservation of wild birds of prey (UK and worldwide) should be published in order to provide a fair and unbiast source of information to the general public.

    As food for thought; if the remaining chick fledges too early and perhaps could not be replaced in the nest due to a minor injury, who will get the bird rehabilitated and re-released as quickly as possible with a realistic chance of survival? The best chance for the bird in this unfortunate situation would be in the hands of an experienced falconer.

    Like

    • daventu says:

      Hi there – thank you for this. We have responded to your earlier comment on this blog, but will include here too:

      Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust recognises that the vast majority of people involved in falconry pose no threat whatsoever to wild birds. Whilst appreciating that the reference to falconers/falconry in the video about the ringing has caused some distress to legitimate falconers we do not regarding it as mis-leading. To deny that chicks are ever taken for use in falconry would, however, be misleading. In our previous blog entries and media releases about the threats posed to chicks we have been acutely conscious of the need for balance and usually refer to people who take live chicks as thieves – this approach has resulted in positive feedback from the falonry community.

      Erin McDaid
      Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

      Like

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