First egg of 2013 lays foundations for nesting season

The first peregrine falcon egg of 2013

The first peregrine falcon egg of 2013

Following the trials and tribulations of Nottingham city centre’s resident pair of peregrine falcons last year, the organisers of a hugely successful webcam project are hoping for less of an emotional rollercoaster during the 2013 breeding season.

A pair of peregrine falcons, a protected species, has been nesting successfully high on Nottingham Trent University’s Newton building for over a decade, raising a number of chicks each year. However, changeable weather including heavy rains, low temperatures and high winds, resulted in the pair losing three of their four chicks last year.

Hundreds of thousands of viewers around the globe logged on to watch the drama unfold as the only remaining chick battled for survival in harsh conditions. But after its mother provided much needed shelter until the weather receded, the chick, later named Storm by webcam viewers, survived and flew the nest.

Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust, which works with the university to protect the birds, believes that the warm spell of weather earlier in the year turned out to be the birds’ downfall and is hoping that the cold spell of weather well into February and March this year will give the birds a better chance of survival, as long as the weather warms up soon.

Speaking about the arrival of the first egg of 2013, Erin McDaid, of the Wildlife Trust, said: “The fact that the first egg has been laid a little later than last year gives us hope that the weather will improve before the eggs hatch. We are all looking on excitedly to see how many eggs will be laid this year and we are looking forward to working with the team at Nottingham Trent University to keep people up to date with progress using the Falcon Cam blog.”

The progress of what must now be one of the world’s most famous peregrine families will be broadcast live over the internet 24/7 until the chicks leave the nest in the summer. And viewers look set to gain an even greater insight into the lives of these beautiful and fascinating birds thanks to enhanced infrared capability which should give improved picture quality at night.

Mr McDaid continued: “Falcon Cam provides us with a unique educational resource, a platform from which we can inform people about these wonderful birds and the threats posed to them and other birds of prey. The quality of the cameras makes this one of, if not the best, webcam wildlife projects featuring a peregrine nest in the world and we are privileged to have the opportunity to watch wild animals in such clarity right in the heart of Nottingham.”

Grant Anderson, environmental manager at Nottingham Trent University, said: “The university is always keen to improve its services and we hope that the new infrared cameras will enhance the night time viewing of these magnificent birds for people across the world to enjoy.

“The plight of the chicks last year led to emotions running high among the many viewers who logged on to our cameras. We really hope that this year the weather makes for better conditions to rear chicks so that they all survive and go on to fly the nest.”

To view the camera or the latest blog entries go to www.ntu.ac.uk/falcons or follow the links from the Wildlife Trust’s website www.nottinghamshirewildlife.org.

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About chrisntu

Nottingham Trent University press officer
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203 Responses to First egg of 2013 lays foundations for nesting season

  1. Maureen.Poran says:

    Yippee! Apparently Ma Peregrine will only start roosting when all her eggs are laid… interesting!

    X Maureen

    Like

    • Alan says:

      Just been looking at the weather for the next couple of days and there is heavy snow for this area from lunch tomorrow and all day saterday 20/40 cm (bbc weather) if she sits the egg she has now to protect it from the cold are we going to get one much larger chick ,or if the egg is left will it be able to cope with the snow

      Like

      • chrisntu says:

        Hi,

        Thanks for your question. They will not start incubating until all the eggs are laid, so for the time being, they should be OK as they will remain in a state of stasis.

        Like

    • john west says:

      hi she looks quite an old bird going on the size of her bill, hope she’s still got a few more breeding seasons to come. great job to all concerned. john

      Like

    • Rob says:

      All
      Most birds of prey will incubate from the first egg. This staggers the hatching and insures that one chick is stronger than the others. In harsh times the weakest don’t make it but strongest should survive

      Like

  2. Damian Taylor says:

    Great news, but what about all this snow that is forecast, will that not affect it?

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi,

      Thanks for your question. They will not start incubating until all the eggs are laid, so for the time being, they should be OK as they will remain in a state of stasis.

      Like

  3. Margaret says:

    Saw her laying the egg about 11.20 , will the forecasted snow do it any harm ?

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi,

      Thanks for your question. They will not start incubating until all the eggs are laid, so for the time being, they should be OK as they will remain in a state of stasis.

      Like

      • Sarah says:

        Hi Chris, bear with me here as I see you keep repeating yourself but I’m not quite getting it. Each time I look the hen is sitting on the egg, what keeps it in stasis until the others are laid?

        Like

      • chrisntu says:

        Hi Sarah,

        The female will sit on the current egg for as long as she thinks necessary to keep it warm enough. As it’s particularly cold this may mean she sits for longer than she would normally. Full incubation won’t start until the female lays the penultimate egg. As this pair have traditionally laid three or four eggs, full incubation won’t start for a good few days yet so hopefully this cold snap won’t have any lasting impact.

        Like

  4. Rita Harries says:

    The opportunity which you afford your followers is truly appreciated, even the sad outcomes. It is nature as its most honest. Thank you.

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Thanks Rita, we’re glad it’s appreciated and we always welcome the feedback.

      Like

    • charlie watts says:

      How is it nature?They have been provided with a nest from the wildlife trust!i dont call that natural.Peregrines are being encouraged to breed in our towns by the wildlife trust etc,only trouble is they are killing all our songbirds along the way.How many songbirds do you see or hear nowadays?not many.There are now thousands in the uk,the problem being there is nothing to hunt them and keep there numbers down.I think a monster has been created.Soon the RSPB and Wildlife trust will be wanting donations for breeding programmes for blackbirds etc,like the one dead on the ledge.I wont be donating again ime afraid.

      Like

      • Kev says:

        Your rite Charlie.

        Like

      • Graham Robinson says:

        Hi Charlie,

        i stand to be corrected but i believe the reduction in song bird numbers is largely due to the spread of that alien species, the Grey Squirrel.

        There is an abundance of feral pigeons in town centers that the peregrines are capable of taking and i don’t think the odd blackbird will harm the species.

        Like

  5. Karen says:

    Great to see Falcon back laying her eggs again this year. I followed right through last year & will do same again this year. Lets hope more than one survives this time. Good luck XXX

    Like

  6. Taylor John says:

    my wife & i are over the moon at the news of the first egg being laid,we have been logged on since this time last year and visit the web page 3 or 4 times a day ( even christmas day ) thanks very much for the e mail and keep up the good work

    Like

  7. Jeff Mann says:

    Brilliant News!!!!

    I’m booking my armchair & sandwiches already!!!!

    Jeff – Calverton

    Like

  8. Sylvia Newton says:

    Congratulations to our wonderful pair of falcons, looking forward with interest to the coming weeks.

    Like

  9. Lynn says:

    Mrs P on the egg at the mo and Mr P is sat on the ledge keeping guard 😉

    Like

  10. Gill Web says:

    How exciting! Good Luck to Mr & Mrs Falcon for a happy & safely-
    reared brood this year.

    Like

  11. Hetty says:

    I’ve been watching for a couple of days and thought an egg must appear soon. She’s been so fidgety around the nest it was obvious things were happening! Let’s wish our pair more luck than they had last year.

    Like

  12. Brilliant news, hope the nasty weather goes soon and its a better season this year, keep up the great work guys 🙂

    Like

  13. Christine says:

    Here we go again !! Hold on tight folks

    Like

  14. Judith says:

    I’ve been watching for a couple of weeks happy to see the first egg laid this morning hope mr&mrs falcon have better luck this year.hope we have some good weather .thank you for the live web.cam.

    Like

  15. john stirland says:

    Great stuff.Norwich peregrines have there first egg today too

    Like

    • Maureen says:

      Another few months watching the unfolding of this riveting story, as the dust piles up and chores don’t get done! Who cares, this is marvellous. Thank you so much NTU and Chris and team.

      Like

    • Hetty says:

      Feel sorry for them this morning sitting in the nest with the snow falling all around. It must be miserable – looks cold and windy up there. Not sure whether it’s Mum or Dad in the nest just now, but he/she is sticking to the job despite the unpleasant conditions!

      Like

  16. walton05 says:

    ahh im so happy i followed them through last year and i will do this year and im only thirteen

    Like

  17. WILD NOTTINGHAM says:

    Good news that the first egg has appeared, good luck to the Peregrines. And congratulations to the team at NWT and NTU for the enlightening webcam project – a valuable tool in helping us appreciate the nature in our city. Keep up the good work!

    Like

  18. pamela says:

    so no house work just watching falcon barn owls time for the hoover to have a rest yippee

    Like

  19. terry davies says:

    Great news & I saw it happen this afternoon.Thanks for the incubation info as we are all watching the weather.

    Like

  20. Sue Hall says:

    Female not sitting on egg

    Like

  21. Really excited Mr & Mrs P are back again! Just told my 8 year old and he is also very happy, he really got into it last year and was glued to the PC everyday watching them. Lets just hope the weather is better this year for them both

    Like

  22. fiona says:

    Always amazes me how every year this great event coincides with my marking mountain arriving! A wonderful natural procrastination…….Thank you 🙂

    Like

  23. SueAtt says:

    Good luck NTU Falcons – lets get this next lot of snow out of the way and hope for some ‘normal’ spring and summer weather to follow!

    Like

  24. Peter Lee says:

    been following our local celeb couple for last couple of months, am lucky enough to be able to keep an eye on them whilst at work two minutes away, have to confess i let out a massive whoop wheni was lucky enough to witness arrival late morning, though did attract a few odd looks if im honest!!!! thanks to the team behind this, keeps me sane at work!! especially Mr McDaid who i went to school with, great job guy’s i’ll be watching fervently and looking forward to a successful year for all concerned.

    Like

  25. S says:

    Woohoo!!! first egg!!! 😀 Just checked cam late at night to see falcon nestled down for the night, incubating. Good to see!! Fingers crossed for a good season!!!

    Like

  26. Sean says:

    Oooooo so excited! I have been watching also for a while and have seen them scraping the box, so I was hopeful that it would all be starting again soon. Working at NTU gives me the oportunity to often see these awesome birds flying about the city or just sitting up on a ledge on the building surveying their domain which is great. Can’t deny though, that the sign of all this snow this morning is making me somewhat worried that another year may well be a battle for them! Best of luck to Mr & Mrs, and lets hope for a healthy and successful family this year 🙂

    Like

  27. sinbad1897 says:

    Hi Everyone, Well what a start with the first egg laid, poor weather conditions yet again. We who watch with great interest will be so worried for the next couple of days. I am sure mum & dad will cope, sitting very tight on her first egg, here`s hoping for some better weather soon.

    Like

  28. walton05 says:

    i just want to put a blanket round that poor falcon i feel so sorry for it having to sit there in the ice cold conditions =(

    Like

  29. Many thanks again go to the NTU team .ALSO…MRS & MR P ..

    Like

  30. walton05 says:

    i just hope it pulls throgh the horrorble weather

    Like

  31. john west says:

    great to see the birds so safe and secure, well away from gamekeepers and pigeon fanciers.

    Like

  32. Billybags says:

    Here we go again, this is so exciting.. I looked in last week but found nothing, so glad they are back. Thanks for letting me know.

    Like

  33. mark 37260 says:

    glad to see the first egg hope she is ok we will be keeping a close eye on her also well done to all at ntu for setting this up for up for us all to enjoy.

    Like

  34. Phoebe says:

    It looks like the falcon is about to lay another egg! A bit close I think but you never know. She could just be cooling the first one though.

    Like

  35. john stirland says:

    Well the nest is full of snow,nearly covering the peregrine, what a start for them,lets hope for a break in the weather for them today

    Like

  36. SueAtt says:

    Oh poor Mrs P – she’s completely snowed in! Hope she was able to feed before this lot arrived. 😦

    Like

  37. Trevor says:

    Poor mrs p up to her neck in snow

    Like

  38. Gill Web says:

    I suppose if the snow piles up high enough around her it may act like an igloo! It’s hard to watch her getting buried by the flakes.

    Like

  39. fiona says:

    In many ways glad to see her snuggled down in the snow, gives her shelter from the wind and wet which are the real worries. Remember these are mountain birds and have adapted to these conditions. What was the problem last year was the wet and the wind. strangely reassured….

    Like

    • Sally says:

      My thoughts exactly, I think she looks snug as a bug in a rug, unlike the bedraggled mess she was after the horrible windy, wet weather last year 🙂

      Like

  40. stop snowing please poor Mrs P needs some warmth xx

    Like

  41. Nick says:

    It’s Déjà vu all over again… Hang in there Mrs P

    Like

  42. Nick Brown says:

    I’m not quite sure if we should congratulate your female on laying her first egg ahead of others or wish she had delayed by a week!
    Here at Derby Cathedral our female has been mating for a while now but there’s no egg yet thankfully – the snow is even deeper here than on your nest and looks like remaining for days yet! We’ll be watching both your and our birds carefully over the next week – hoping they succeed and beat the awful weather!
    However, as Fiona said, they are tough characters these falcons, used to nesting on icy mountains and wild sea cliffs so they should be adapted to harsh conditions – and of course should first clutches fail, they will often lay a second.
    Good to hear that you have infrared this year. We have a new wide angled camera that gives stunning views – if you want to see a pile of snow, google ‘derbyperegrines’ to reach our blog and the tab for the web cams.
    Nick Brown
    (for the Derby Peregrine team. BTW, our project is managed by the Derbyshire Wildlife Trust, sister to the Notts. Trust of course).

    Like

    • SueAtt says:

      Had a look earlier at Derby and Norwich – saw your nest was snow covered, but Norwich looked ok. I also follow the Dyfi Ospreys – everyone eagerly awaiting the return of the Osprey pair, but hope they delay it for a while until the weather improves. One of the Rutland Ospreys arrived back in the middle of a blizzard a few days ago!

      Like

  43. Sally says:

    Was something mentioned before about possibly putting a canopy over the box after what happened last year?

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi Sally,

      Thanks for your question. This is covered in our FAQs.

      Like

      • hils1944 says:

        I note that the FAQs does mention the trial with a covering over the nest some years ago but last spring was very wet with the resultant loss of chicks. This spring, forecasters are already saying is the coldest March in 50yrs. Bearing in mind these terrible weather conditions, a covering could’ve been placed over the nest box. In the wild, peregrines nest in places where they are protected and even on cliff tops, they will nest where they can be protected from the wind and snow being blown in on them.

        Like

  44. Teresa says:

    Mr P has just bought Mrs P a bite to eat… I take my hat off to her for coping in this horrible weather…

    Like

  45. sinbad1897 says:

    Well we all here have just just lloked at the Peregrine nest, wow astonished at the nest site.
    Mrs P should be laying her 2nd egg today, hang in there we are all rooting for you, what drama yet again, plenty of food available for them, pigeon pie anyone!!!!
    Good luck Peregrins.

    Like

  46. Belinda says:

    I also saw Mr P bring a small morsel. Mrs P only left the egg(s) for about half a minute. Couldn’t see how many eggs as snow too deep. I want to open the window and scoop the snow away!!

    Like

  47. pamela says:

    what a mother this falcon is 5*

    Like

  48. S says:

    the snow can sometimes act as insulation, as long as she’s not too wet. It does look like rather wet snow. Poor mama. Hoping it lets up soon.

    Like

  49. Billybags says:

    I wonder where Storm is? Will he be around this area or does he go further a field. How old will he be before he starts breeding.

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi,

      This is a good question, but not one which I have an immediate answer for. I will see what we can find out next week and come back to you.

      Like

      • john west says:

        first year peregrines quite often return to the nesting site, but dispite the care the parent birds showed last year they will be driven out

        Like

  50. S says:

    one good thing: I think it might be easier for her to protect an *egg* from this weather, than to protect a bunch of *chicks* like last year.

    Like

  51. Been watching her all morning … bless her heart!!! Saw her fly off just before 12.08 pm for about 16/17 minutes perhaps for some much needed wingercising?! Lovin’ your comments about the snow acting as insulation – I get that 🙂 but when the snow thaws …. 😥 …. surely the nest box will be extremely wet 😥 Got everything crossed here for this lovely pair and their future offspring. I often wonder how Storm is doing ❤ I followed this pair last year and … lurked on your blog 😦 thought I'd be brave and comment this year. Thank you NTU for giving me the privilege of watching 🙂

    Like

    • Hetty says:

      I seem to remember them saying last year that they’d drilled holes in the bottom of the nest box so that water wouldn’t collect in it, so when the snow thaws it should be able to drain away. Let’s hope so anyway.

      Like

  52. sinbad1897 says:

    Hi Billybags, Peregrins reach sexual maturity at round one year old, they usually mate for life, unless one of the pair die, they will usually pair up with another Peregrin in a matter weeks.
    Usually start incubating the eggs when the second egg is laid, thereby ensuring there is a survival in poor conditions for the older chicks. Last year was a real bad time, to have one survive was amazing, we all continue to watch these amazing birds.
    The Peregrins in Italy are sitting on 4 eggs, may hatch in the week or 2.
    Good luck to our Peregrins during this weather, i think it is thawing slightly, maybe the snow will be there for a while if we have a cold night.

    Like

  53. redtedng9 says:

    Like many I have been watching the birds throughout the winter and it is so good to see the pair of birds expanding their family. This coming week is going to be a real test as the temperatures will be very cold-mother nature really does test the Nottingham falcons, let’s hope these birds see this through.

    Like

  54. Jason says:

    Just wondered (considering the trials and tribulations the pair and their chicks went through last year and the perilous state of Peregrine populations in the UK), have you considered the possibility of constructing a ‘discreet’ roof over the top of their usual nest site. I know nothing about whether they would accept this or reject their usual nesting place, but it certainly would have provided a bit of welcome protection from the rain last year, and the snow yesterday and today?!

    Like

  55. Lynn says:

    Great to see them back- but it’s oh so cold- poor thing hunkered down in the snow!

    Like

  56. hils1944 says:

    I’ve been watching here for a couple of years, as well as other peregrine sites. I do hope the chicks make it this year.

    Like

  57. Sehdev_is says:

    Any way NTU can add a perspex cover or rebuild the nest box. Like the CXH wildlife whisperer peregrines live webcam. It will give birds eggs and chicks shelter. The falcons are all snowed up.

    Sent from Samsung Mobile

    NTU Falcons wrote:

    Like

    • John Doran says:

      Arn’t these projects supposed to be all about nature, so what is natural about proving cover that the Peregrines have survived 1000’s of years without! These human provided nesting sites have already provided an inblance in nature so there shouldnt be any more interference , despite the sadness of losing young, that is nature i’m afraid. But believe me i have seen Peregrines survive harsher conditions than these are currently experiencing!

      Like

  58. Pip says:

    This is becoming increasingly difficult to watch. Will she continue to sit until she is literally buried under snow? What will happen when the snow thaws, is there adequate drainage to prevent the box filling with water?

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi Pip,

      It’s not a water tight box, so there should be no problems with regards to drainage.

      Like

    • George says:

      Pip. As hard as it may be for you to watch, it is called nature & will be happening all over the country. They are very tough birds used to nesting in difficult places in all sorts of weather.

      Like

  59. bob bloore says:

    second egg was laid about 9.30 yesterday evening before snow was too deep to see in scrape the egg looked white and very fresh

    Like

  60. Nick says:

    Saw Mrs P lay another egg at about 7:10 pm

    Like

  61. tim tuckwood says:

    can you add a heater on the inside wall or window just to help melt the snow, It may give a little help in the bad weather ??

    Like

  62. daniel99 says:

    Surely one of the new chicks must be called Blizzard!

    Like

  63. Phoebe says:

    Has anyone got a screen capture of the second egg? I thought it looked imminent last night.

    Like

  64. sinbad1897 says:

    Hi Damian, She may be now incubating the 2 eggs, if you remember last year, 1 egg hatched, 2 the next day, one one about day & half later. The older chicks will always receive the food first, if there is a shortage the young ones perish first, this ensures survival, if 2 survive that is good odds, if 4 eggs are laid & hatch, then survive it will be fantastic, we were lucky that one survived last year. We are all hoping she lays 2 more eggs, hopefully does not desert if the weather turns much worse, well she is sitting tight surrounded by snow at the moment. It may another couple of days before the snow may start thawing. Fingers crossed, what a start to the breeding season.

    Like

  65. S says:

    I have to remind myself that falcons, and other types of birds, have dealt with severe weather for tens of thousands of years, without man building them shelters. But it is difficult to watch.

    Like

  66. S says:

    just checked the cam….mama is snowed-over; can’t see her head, but I can see her breathing. It looks dismal, but for all we know, she might be snug as a bug. Snow can be a great insulator.

    Like

  67. S says:

    Oh! Mama just raised her head and shook off the snow, and looked around like she was surprised by how much it had snowed, lol! Then she put her head into another position and went back to sleep! ^^

    Like

  68. mickiete says:

    Just got i and seen her…feel so sorry for her….

    Like

  69. S says:

    Dad just arrived. Mom took off….Dad hopped into deep snow of nest and nearly lost his balance and almost did a faceplant into the snow. But he settled right into mom’s niche in the snow, tucked his head in, and got comfortable. Very quick changeover!

    Like

  70. Sean says:

    I know that these birds are well adapted to harsh weather conditions,… but I still can’t help feeling so sad to see her sitting there in a freezing cold pile of snow, feel like I just wanna go up there, brush it all away, and give her a nice hot water bottle to snuggle up to 🙂

    Like

  71. Nick says:

    Was anyone watching at about 7:10 last night… I’m sure I saw a third egg being laid at that time?

    Like

  72. storm says:

    8.43am adult got off nest and had food on the ledge, 8.48 adult flow off with food, 8.53 adult returns and settles onto eggs again.

    Like

  73. SW says:

    Three people on the Norwich forum thought she laid an egg around 7.30pm, I think – just by her behaviour.

    Like

  74. chris morley says:

    morning all,courage of our female is immence,but be at ease if her life was at risk she would leave eggs,they are tough birds and are used to weather she will be fine,this is no doubt the best webcam in uk,though there are lots more to view chichester birds are about to lay,they ant had a flake there,was same last year seem to have good weather in sussex

    Like

  75. Sally says:

    10.29am and Dad’s taken over whilst Mum’s just flown off for a break

    Like

  76. charlie watts says:

    Its hardly suprising the songbird population is in decline.There are now thousands of peregrines in the uk and they are killing evertyhing with two wings.They have nothing to predate them so in years to come the skies will be full of them.I am a bird lover of all types but encouraging these raptors to breed in an unatural environment is only asking for trouble.We have laws for dangerous dogs,unfortunately there are none for dangerous birds.I would prefer to sit in my garden and watch and listen to blackbirds,robins etc but they are becoming a thing of the past as it seems people nowdays prefer to see these songbirds being snatched from the sky by the peregrines.These birds for years have lived on coastlines and mountainous areas etc fending for themselves,now it seems humans are mothering them for there own entertainment.

    Like

    • Anne says:

      Sorry Charlie but I think you are exaggerating. Peregrines have chosen to breed in an unnatural environment, putting a box for them is no different to putting nest boxes in our gardens for songbirds, that is hardly mothering them. There must be many reasons for the decline of songbirds but surely predation by raptors is not at the top of the list. I have plenty of songbirds in my garden & apart from once seeing a sparrow hawk trying to catch a woodpigeon the only other “predatory” behaviour I have seen is crows taking eggs!

      Like

      • Damian Taylor says:

        Can I just add Cats to that least of songbird predators please..

        Like

      • Pam Birley says:

        …and grey squirrels !!

        Like

      • Damian Taylor says:

        **list (predictive tx)

        Like

      • Kev says:

        What surprise me is the fact these wild peregrine’s have choose to nest in Derby, Manchester, Nottingham, Grantham, Lincoln, London Wales just about everywhere something does not quite add up…People take more interest and show more concern for something like this than the poor soldiers fighting for the likes of us shame but true.

        Like

    • chris morley says:

      hear what you say charlie,but there are lots of birds of prey out there,sparrowhawks take songbirds more than peregrines,there is a pair of saker falcons in my local area as well plus escaped birds knocking about from time to time,songbirds are suffering more from lack of habitat me thinks nature will balance things out if its allowed ,plus all ntu/wildlife trust have done is put a box where they was nesting anyway,but you are right there are at least 4 breeding pairs of peregrines in nottm,plus lots of spr/hawks ,there is also goshawks in the county lots of buzzards andf kestrels,we need to try to help songbirds but birds of prey are not the problem,we need more WILD places even a bit of farmers fields if they leave a couple of yards near hedges it will help

      Like

    • Sally says:

      I think that city peregrine falcons prey more on pigeons than songbirds.

      Like

      • charlie watts says:

        So its ok to kill pigeons is it.I think they should have more rights than the peregrine for there bravery during two world wars.The humble pigeon has saved more lives than any other animal during WW1 & 2.Follow the link for there stories of bravery
        http://www.pdsa.org.uk › About Us › Animal Bravery Awards

        Like

    • john says:

      dangerous birds???please …,magpies and etc predate our garden birds,these peregrines have chosen their nestsite themselves and are not supported in any way more than we put up nest boxes in our gardens.To be fair you do not sound like a bird lover,just a lover of garden birds. or maybe a pigeon fancier You cannot pick and choose,we all put out food for our garden birds,the peregrines have to find their own,just enjoy this unique insite into their lives.Raptor numbers are totally controlled by the food which THEY can find,not fed by us,if we build our cities to look like cliffs….they are simply adapting to survive and you have to admire that ,as for a law on dangerous dogs you cannot compare,never heard of a peregrine attacking a child/family pet..

      Like

      • Kev says:

        May i ask you how you know they have choosen this particular site, is it because the wildlife trust have said this?
        Maybe you would like to speak on behalf of all the areas that have peregrines nesting there, i have mentioned it before and will again what i find very strange they have all been encouraged by providing them with man made nest boxes is that normal?

        Like

      • grantntu says:

        Hi Kev, by all means have a read of our FAQs for info. The falcons certainly arrived at the Newton building before the box was placed on the ledge.

        Like

      • Kev says:

        Yes they did arrive before the box was placed i agree, but when they 1st arrived they nested on Goldsmith Street sides i remember all the bird twitters setting up cameras etc etc. Not where they nest now so why inter fear and place man boxes to encourage? So be it if the eggs roll off the ledge thats nature ….

        Like

    • john west says:

      me thinks we have a pigeon fancier in our midst;;;

      Like

    • hils1944 says:

      many garden birds we don’t see much of today. Perhaps this link to RSPB will help to give you the reasons why and it’s certainly nothing to do with raptors.
      http://www.rspb.org.uk/advice/helpingbirds/decline/birdsdecline.aspx

      Like

    • sallyrootham@ntlworld.com says:

      I live in Sneinton which is less than a mile from the city centre peregrines and I get robins, blackbirds, blue tits, sparrows, wood pigeons, collared doves, magpies and the occasional song thrush and wren in my garden. They come to the bird table where I put food they like so this in itself is perhaps interfering with nature.
      The peregrines began nesting on the Newton Building before a nest box was placed there I think?

      Like

      • chrisntu says:

        Hi Sally,

        Yes, that’s correct they did.

        Like

      • hils1944 says:

        That’s great Sally. I live in Belfast & having moved from my semi to a groundfloor apartment, I miss feeding my garden birds. It was fascinating watching their antics as they competed for the bird seed in the coach lantern! 🙂 As the magpies and jackdaws squawked at each other dropping the seed in the process, a lovely collared dove quietly walked around the ground picking up the dropped seed. I believe he was better fed that the squawking birds on the platform above! 🙂

        Like

    • Lynn. P says:

      Why are Peregrines dangerous ? Is it because they feed on wild birds ? If so then all birds must be dangerous bacause as far as I am aware they feed on our insects bugs and cattarpillars, what about them ? They too are living breathing things. I really don’t understand your point. I bet you provide a false enviroment and put out all manner of food for your garden birds……

      Like

  77. john says:

    sunny day here in North Notts,hopefully will brighten up in central Notts this afternoon for the peregrines

    Like

  78. Sarah says:

    She/he looks fine to me, all fluffed up and hunkered down.
    At least it’s not wet, drenched feathers are the worst thing.

    Like

  79. Phoebe says:

    HI Nick, re 7:10 last night. I have a screenshot from 7:09 last night. It did look like she was laying an egg. For anyone who want to see it, it is here:

    23 March 0001 19:09 hrs  notts falcon

    Like

    • Nick says:

      Hi Phoebe, So pleased someone else saw it. I was just too a bit slow on the “print screen” button 🙂 It is not that easy to see at night either because the egg appears white through the infra-red camera. I don’t know if the NTU team capture all the video footage – it would be good to see the video of Mrs P laying the egg. Well done for being a bit more alert than me and grabbing the screenshot though!

      Like

      • Phoebe says:

        Hi Nick, I use Irfanview it can be set to take a screenshot at the press of a button and save it automatically.

        Like

  80. Jan Smith says:

    Have been watching your peregrine with heart in mouth but as you say, she does look snuggled down and settled. Our Norwich peregrine laid 2nd egg early hours of this morning. We haven’t had nearly as much snow and the strong east wind seems to have stopped it settling this time. Amazing privilege being able to watch them all and hoping for sunny days in Nottingham!

    Like

  81. fiona says:

    14:34, eggs left alone!!!! eeeek

    Like

  82. Phoebe says:

    15:58 The falcon has left the scrape, only one egg can be seen as the snow is too deep to see more. she is feeding on the ledge.

    Like

  83. Sally says:

    16.07 and no mum or dad

    Like

  84. SW says:

    The eggs will be fine on their own for a while at this stage – the parents will incubate continuously once the whole clutch has been laid – see earlier postings.

    Like

  85. how many eggs now?…anyone no?

    Like

  86. Karen says:

    Ahhh poor mrs P still buried in snow when i switched on, she flew off few minutes ago & mr P came along for a while, lets hope things are going to be better than last year. would be a shame for her to loose her chicks again this year.

    Like

  87. Big Ed says:

    Why don’t you create some kind of shelter to put over chrisntu to protect him from people asking the same question over and over again on the blog? Also how about sorting out Sky TV for Mrs P so she can watch the Nature Channel while she’s incubating her eggs?

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Thanks Ed,

      We’ll look into Sky TV. According to our experts, the Nature Channel is the falcons’ answer to Coronation Street. 🙂

      Like

  88. Hetty says:

    Both birds out of the nest at the moment, but only one egg visible. Don’t know if there’s another one hidden by the snow – hard to tell.

    Like

  89. Keyworth red says:

    Hope everything’s o/k, nest empty at 06.10 and 08.21 this morning..

    Like

  90. Good shot of the two eggs clearly visible right now 🙂

    Like

  91. Teresa says:

    Mummy P has gone to stretch her wings… I can only see 1 egg at the moment…

    Like

  92. shame ya cant jump out the window n clear some of that snow out the box but I know ya can’t… it does worry me. Derby (who looks like she is ready to lay) cant find the scrape under the snow… the damp from this can’t be good, surely?

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi Julie,

      Thanks for your question. These are wild birds, so they’re very used to being outside when it’s wet.

      Like

      • I know Chris, I’ve followed them for a good few years and know that there are hundreds of birds facing this weather in unmonitored nests. Its not so much the snow, its when it thaws that it will possibly be damper, after last year I am just rooting for the Notts birds especially as last year was so tragic for them. On the plus side, both mum and dad are working like clockwork with the eggs so thats a good sign 🙂

        Like

  93. Keyworth red says:

    Ah that’s better, she is back. One question, are you worried about when all the snow melts, hope they are drain holes in the nest..

    Like

  94. Lynn says:

    There are two eggs now! I saw her climb out of the nest and look around for a while then fly away for a while . She is back now.

    Like

  95. Teresa says:

    It looks to me like the snow is acting as a bit of a wind barrier… She did look quite unsettled earlier, in and out of the nest… Could this mean another egg may be on its way…

    Like

  96. john west says:

    hi all, our nesting platform in sheffield looks like it was made by bob the builder,,

    Like

  97. Belinda says:

    Hi

    Anyone manage to get a shot of the 2 eggs mentioned this morning as I missed it?

    Thanks
    Belinda

    Like

  98. Andrew says:

    Hi, Is there a possibility to have a mobile version of the feed ? (doesn’t seem to work on Android)

    Like

    • grantntu says:

      Hi Andrew,
      I have just checked with our IT team and they apologise that the feed isn’t currently compatible with android or IOS however they are looking to upgrade compatibility in the future. If you try just copying the webcam link directly into a browser this may work.

      Like

  99. john west says:

    have a look at derby ,is that a hot water bottle?

    Like

  100. Belinda says:

    Its definitely a hot water bottle! That is definitely interfering with nature

    Like

  101. yes it was a hot water bottle I thought I was seeing things

    Like

    • john west says:

      smacks a little desperation to me, obviously it’s to melt the snow, but how do they know the birds arn’t about to return?

      Like

  102. storm says:

    i think i get why derby is doing that but why not just chuck boiling water on it it will drain its quicker and would freak out the falcons so much. unless there is an egg there i missed ! how did these birds evolve without hot water bottles??

    Like

  103. Margaret says:

    I can only see one egg

    Like

  104. Belinda says:

    Hi All

    I think we should all move over to the new blog created this morning. It will be easier to scroll down quicker. Good view of the 2 eggs now at 15:15.

    Belinda

    Like

  105. Margaret says:

    Forget last comment ,must be blind can see 2 now!

    Like

  106. Lynn says:

    I think she might be laying- she’s making alot of noise!

    Like

  107. Lynn says:

    Yes!! There are three eggs now.

    Like

  108. martha says:

    3 Eggs this morning 🙂
    Glad to be back, lets hope for a better year

    Like

  109. 3 eggs at 09:04 26-03-2013

    Like

  110. john west says:

    new forest goshawk cam excellent this year

    Like

  111. Kev says:

    Nice to see you only publish what you want to publish on this site you don’t like anything negative towards the peregrines, i have not been abusive not used any foul language yet half of my posts have not been published i thought it was a site where ppl can discuss and type openly about what they think but it looks i thought wrong.

    Like

  112. Martyn says:

    Just started to follow the web-cams. Hope this year is better than last years emotional rollercoaster.

    Like

  113. Sheena says:

    Can anyone tell me why the camera angle has changed on the one hat should show along the ledge – it now appears to be an even closer view of the nest? Thanks

    Like

  114. tony says:

    hi, havent seen any feeding last few days, have I missed it

    Like

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