What will the season bring?

Starting the incubation period

Starting the incubation period

What will this season bring for our peregrine family and those of us who choose to watch?

Over the past few years, those of us involved with the Falconcam project here in Nottingham have come to expect one thing – the unexpected.

Whilst the nest site atop the Newton Building in the centre of our fair city has been very successful in terms of the number of chicks reared in recent years, the impact of the weather in the 2012, when we lost three out of four chicks, proves that even an experienced pair, on a generally sheltered nest site can still be at the mercy of Mother Nature. The late snow fall this time last year also gave us viewers a bit of a fright, but once again our peregrine pair came through – successfully rearing another brood.

We’ve had other surprises over the years too, such as visits from fully grown chicks from previous years, a precocious pigeon getting very close to the nest and one of the adult birds seemingly interacting with its refection in the window behind the ledge. For most of us these were behaviours never before seen, and for me, this opportunity to observe things we have never seen before, either as individuals or collectively, is the real benefit of the project.

Whilst the cameras were originally installed to help us protect the nest, the quality of the camera set up now gives thousands of us the opportunity to keep a watchful eye on what must be the nation’s most watched peregrine family.

Who knows what the months ahead will bring, but one thing is for sure, there will be plenty of people hooked by the goings on high on a ledge over Nottingham.

Erin McDaid
Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

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59 Responses to What will the season bring?

  1. Donna says:

    This is my third season of watching these beautiful creatures. The highs and lows mean that my nerves are on edge the whole time – but it’s compulsive viewing. I hope that they are not at the mercy of the weather the way they have been but even so, their strength to get through whatever mother nature throws at them is astonishing.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thistledo says:

    I’m definitely a `hookee’ to the finest PF webcam set-up in the land. For that I thank you and the entire team.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dave Cotterill says:

    Your web cam is compulsive viewing. As a bird enthusiast for over 40 years, I keep a small window open in the top corner of my computer whilst working. Congratulations on the fine work you do.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Kelly M says:

    Thanks so much for providing us with this amazing opportunity. I adore birds of prey, especially falcons, and enjoy sneaking a peek at the webcam while I’m in the office. Let’s see what the season brings… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. jancueter@aol.com says:

    Does anyone know exactly how many eggs there are? I saw 3 for sure yesterday!

    Like

  6. Storm Ridley says:

    Can you please make this webcam available on andriod tablets. Thank you.

    Like

  7. Once more I am hooked on watching these fabulous birds, can’t wait for the eggs to hatch and watch how the chicks grow and finally fledge.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Thaiphil says:

    A second year of compulsive viewing for me. I’m living in Thailand now, but was an avid birdwatcher in my youth when I lived a couple of miles from the RSPB reserve at Arne in Dorset. My wife has grown up knowing only native Thai birds in the countryside and finds it fascinating to see a wild bird living in an urban environment. Looks like mum and dad have their work cut out – mum left the nest a couple of minutes ago to reveal four eggs! A devoted mother indeed – it started raining soon after and she was back on the nest straight away!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wheeler says:

    Its addictive! I check in every day to see whats happening, and look forward to seeing the chicks when they arrive.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Joy Walker says:

    I have been waiting since last year for this, I couldnt keep away from the cameras then and am sure I will be as bad this year, thankyou so very much x

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Geoff says:

    What will happen in the future when one or both of the adults die? Will the nest site be abandoned or is there something that can be done to encourage another breeding pair?
    This is compulsive 3 – 4 months viewing each year and I am just wondering if one year it will all end.

    Like

  12. This is my first year observing the falcons through these webcams, and I must confess to popping online several times each day just to see how things are going. I also – like many others here – like to keep a window open on screen whilst working, and it’s a joy to see them on the nest. Keeping fingers firmly crossed for good weather so another generation of these gorgeous hunters can thrive!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. grantntu says:

    Hello, I have deleted the post. Thanks

    Like

  14. Ok…I admit it….nothing much is going to get done again between eggs hatching and chicks fledging, just like last year….no one can ever say I’m not consistent!
    This is the best webcam ever and I am truly grateful to you people at the Uni for getting it up and running and then keeping it going…pity I am not younger as I would have loved to study and research raptors of all kinds, but especially the peregrine…
    Thanks again though…for allowing me the opportunity to learn so much from home 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Pam Birley says:

    I see a wider, more shallow nest bowl has been excavated by the nesting birds. The weather should be better today for them. The sun is already shining here in Leicester.

    Like

  16. Change over at 5.45pm……… looks a struggle sometimes covering 4 eggs before actually laying over them

    Like

  17. Sheena says:

    Is there something wrong with Mr. P’s right wing as his feathers seem a bit bedraggled near the shoulder? I have just been watching as camera one was zoomed in to him.

    Like

  18. Kathy says:

    An egg at Derby Cathedral now (since 12.30am Saturday morning). Over 2.6 million hits to their web cams since they started apparently……Google ‘derby peregrines’ to get to their blog etc.
    And I read on their blog that if you are a local teacher, they have school resources boxes all about peregrines too (scroll down the blog for details).
    Kathy

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Just watched Dad take over from Mum…..he does like to take his turn on the eggs 🙂

    Like

  20. s dickins says:

    10.47 Monday 31st just seen changeover from Mr to Mrs or vice versa. Done in about 3 seconds!

    Like

  21. Lynn says:

    Just seen the changeover- but failed to see them together enough to decide if it is Mum or Dad on nest now(April 1 8.35am- anyone know?

    Like

  22. Mikey says:

    Thanks from a three-year veteran.

    I know I can probably google it, but can someone explain how I can tell the difference between the male and female birds? I saw my first switchover on Sunday and would love to be able to tell at a glance which is which.

    Like

    • bobness says:

      Tricky, but Gwen is about 1/3 bigger and has a more viciously hooked beak.
      Perry is correspondingly smaller and looks a bit more “boy-ish” (to me and my work colleagues, anyway).
      I know you shouldn’t anthropomorphosise, but it’s tricky not to.
      Essentially, they’re virtually identical in all but size, which does make it tricky. It’s not as if one has blue legs the other red, for instance, or they’re coloured like a male and female Chaffinch.
      Easy to tell apart when they’re both there, not so easy when you only see one; you need to get your eye in, as they say.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Lynn says:

    I am told that the female is larger than the male and has a more hooked beak- but you need to see them together to appreciate that!

    Like

  24. Carolyn McCullough says:

    She just moved off the nest -FOUR eggs!!!

    PROTECT – PERSONAL

    Like

  25. Just a quick question as I just started watching the cam and I counted four eggs but I think I saw the mother bird eat one of them. Is that a common occurrence when they are hungry?
    Thanks.

    Like

  26. Christine H says:

    Lovely close up views just now – thank you ! Expecting a 3rd egg at Derby sometime today

    Like

  27. Pam Birley says:

    Just watched changeover and there are definitely still four eggs….what a relief 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Mikey says:

    If anyone is interested, there is also a webcam on a four-egg nest a few miles up the road at Sheffield University. There is only the one cam so you don’t get the wider perspective you get for NTU. Also, there is a blind spot on the nest which you can guarantee is where stuff will happen once the chicks hatch. Like this, it is supported by a (very good) blog.

    Webcam – http://efm.dept.shef.ac.uk/peregrine/
    Blog – http://sheffieldperegrines.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m also watching the Sheffield birds as I live 11 miles out of the city….I’m hoping to get hubby to take me into the city to see the birds flying about….if not I shall just make do with watching the webcam…..

      Like

  29. Just caught a 3rd falcon at the end of the ledge!

    Like

    • Alison says:

      Storm perhaps? Or a baby from last year? How exciting and I will keep an eye out for any further visits. 2.52 pm and just watched the latest changeover – all eggs looking good.

      Like

  30. Caliope says:

    I am addicted to both this and the Sheffield peregrine webcam! They are amazing.
    But I’ve also found something a little different – a hummingbird with chicks!!
    http://www.ornithos.com.br/live-cam-5/

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Christine H says:

    A fourth egg is expected at Derby Cathedral ither overnight or tomorrow ( saturday ), you are all right – it is addictive, there is also Norwich and Aylesbury to watch – no wonder I don’t get any housework done – oh and the ospreys at Loch Garten and Loch of the Lowes !

    Like

  32. geebee7 says:

    Oh poor Mr P looks very wet at the moment. 😦

    Like

    • I keep imagining some kind soul scaling a ladder with tea and biscuits (and an umbrella) for these poor, bedraggled – and devoted! – parents-to-be. They do look very miserable at times! But then, when those eggs hatch, it’s going to swing the other way and be a none-stop food delivery service. Put your talons up while you can, peregrines!

      Like

  33. Sally Aycrigg-Tate says:

    At the moment Mrs P seems to be going mad eating stones! I wish she would settle down!

    Like

  34. Judith Lee says:

    Hope the weather stay fine for these wonderful birds.

    Like

  35. geebee7 says:

    Mrs P having a snooze whilst keeping the eggs warm. Mind you she will need all the sleep she can get as she is going to be a busy bee soon.

    Like

  36. when are the eggs due to hatch?

    Like

  37. barbara deane says:

    Why has my yesterday’s post been deleted??????

    Like

  38. kathryn says:

    woke up to see the adult eating egg shell (not seen a bundle of fluff tho)

    Like

  39. Keyworth Red says:

    Just seen one chick, (09.15) Well done Mrs P, on St Georges Day as well, got to be called George.

    Like

  40. Mike Metcalf says:

    The chick is moving around nicely underneath her. Great to see at last.

    Like

  41. Philip Vye says:

    Have I missed something? Judging by the large pile of white feathers on the ledge, it looks like either a flock of seagulls chose the wrong flightpath, or Mr & Mrs P have managed to catch a swan!

    Like

  42. barbara deane says:

    hi Philip

    you seem to have got left behind!! go to the top of the page and click on ‘Amazing knitted falcons………. that will bring you to the latest part of the story!

    Only happened upon you cos I was trying to find the date the chicks hatched!

    Like

  43. phil says:

    I am a bird lover,but what i fail to understand is the RSPB and WTF say our garden birds are in decline and await handouts to research this.Then they ask for donations for birds of prey(the birds that kill the songbirds)How hypocritical is that!.I used to donate but not anymore because of this.The nest at the university is in a totally unatural environment for the peregrines.I dread to think what it smells like with all those bones and carcasses.I used to enjoy watching the songbirds on my bird box,but it has now become a restaurant for sparrowhawks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Like

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