Action stations

More feathery chicks at the NTU Newton building

More feathery chicks at the NTU Newton building

The last couple of weeks have been exciting on the Newton building’s lofty ledge.  We had a few days of drama as the 4th egg remained un-hatched.  Thankfully the egg eventually did hatch and we were left with 4 healthy eyasses.  Due to the fantastic hunting weather the smallest falcon is getting enough food and starting to catch up its siblings in size.  The experience of Mr. and Mrs. P has once again been apparent.  However we did question the experience of the mother mallard who was photographed leading her 11 ducklings towards the Market place! 

We noticed there are already name suggestions flying about in the blog comments. Please keep them coming in so we can pick our favourites for the traditional public vote. The front runners currently appear to be George, Georgia and Patrick due to the links with the national saints days.  When we do the ringing of the new birds we should be able to tell what sex they are so please provide a variety of suggestions.

We’ll continue to do our best to get some good quality close up shots during feeding time. It’s grizzly viewing at times but I still haven’t seen anything as surprising as when a falcon was spotted on the Nottingham council house with the head and neck of a swan in its talons some years ago!

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121 Responses to Action stations

  1. Pam Birley says:

    “Cor luv a duck !” Thanks Grant.

    Like

  2. andyuk says:

    its 11am and mum has brought a fully feathered town pigeon in. looks like they are less concerned with filling the nest with feathers when the chicks are bigger

    Like

  3. Thistledo says:

    Just love your report Grant, particularly the `extras’ – thank you. Not too keen on the suggested names you mentioned but I have my thinking cap on now so please expect the names you will finally choose, lol. Look forward very much to hearing of your further comments.

    Like

  4. Thanks for the new blog…and the pic of the mad mallard mummy, she clearly hasn’t heard of health and safety. Choice of names for the chicks is good and I can’t wait to see what we have…will it be 3 female to 1 male or some other combination?
    Its been nerve wracking watching the litlle un since it hatched but fingers crossed it continues to do well, having a right good feed as I type and putting weight on by the hour…….
    We all know the next stage is positively nail biting time, as all the chicks find their feet, some of which are humungous…and start to explore beyond the box……I tend to hold my breath every time one gets out and goes walkabout………especially when they realise they can hop along that ledge!

    Like

    • geebee7 says:

      Tell me about it. I worry about nests in my own garden without worrying about one of these babies deciding to see how near the edge it can get without falling.

      Like

  5. geebee7 says:

    Very soon we won’t see the babies for discarded feathers, what a mess. Mr and
    Mrs P need to get the broom out.

    Like

  6. barbara deane says:

    As far as the state of the nest ,is concerned – perhaps someone at the ntu could put up a notice saying ……..PLEASE CLEAN YOUR ROOM!!!!!!!! LOL

    I put that at the end of the last blog before I realised that a new one had been started!!

    Just cannot wait for the next part of the story!

    Please keep up the good work and thanks for everything! https://www.dropbox.com/s/uabdk9anhb6reb4/Screenshot%202014-05-12%2018.15.16.png

    Like

    • steve says:

      The Nottm city council moan about feral pigeon Feces all over the city buildings yet what a sight with all the Peregrines Feces splattered all over the ledge.

      Like

  7. Leah wallace says:

    I think one should called fluffy and another one should be called summer don’t know about the others.

    Like

  8. mary in wales says:

    fantastic blog as usual we watch with bated breath here in wales the chicks look great. they have been lucky with the weather. check out the new camera on the dyfi osprey project and if you are lucky you will spot the new hide.keep up the comments we enjoy them here in wales.

    Like

  9. And not forgetting a proud – but wet – parent:-

    Like

  10. Pam Birley says:

    A heap of comatose white fluff, with one panting head sticking out of the middle. Must be warm on the ledge. A few flies around too.

    Like

  11. barbara deane says:

    Not a patch on ‘our family’, but just thought that I would share this with you! This sparrowhawk dropped in for tea one afternoon just over 2 years ago! Was there for ages and gave me time to go upstairs to get my camera, and managed to take about 10 photos of her!https://www.dropbox.com/s/eyodkghgjp65vm0/IMG_0383.JPG

    Like

    • barbara deane says:

      Forgot to say that she was just 10ft from our kitchen window!

      Like

      • andyuk says:

        nice photo. its always a thrill to see a spar. looks like it has a pigeon. i was watching a fox in the garden at dusk a week ago, snaffling some bits from under the feeder when a hawk did a sneaky low pass just over its head, probably trying to ambush a late bird on the feeder. i dont think it knew the fox was there. it would have been a gonna if the fox had heard him in time, but i dont think it even knew it had gone overhead

        Like

  12. Jane Spain says:

    We were almost able to watch breakfast being caught just now. The city pigeons could be seen flying around below. Both parents shot off like bullets and a pigeon was duly delivered just seconds later. Amazing!

    Like

  13. Pammy D says:

    I saw an early morning feed, and the little one didn’t get much. I’m still worried. Is my worrying warranted, or am I just being pessimistic?

    I still don’t think that little one is out of the woods.

    Like

    • Pam Birley says:

      I don’t think you need worry Pammy. Little one is doing just fine. It will always be a bit behind the others in its development but unless for whatever reason there is a sudden shortage of food it will be okay. It is good that the other chicks do not give it a hard time. I have watched some very aggressive behaviour on eagle and osprey nests but the Peregrines don’t seem to peck at their siblings….from what I have seen at any rate.

      Like

  14. geebee7 says:

    Watching them trying to walk with those giant feet is like watching someone trying to walk down the beach in flippers………:)

    Like

  15. SueAtt says:

    Lovely video of the chicks – thank you. The nest does seem to be extra messy this year – not the tidiest of birds are they? Lovely to see that all 4 are thriving – especially ‘titch’.

    As for Mrs Mallard well what can I say? She must have completely lost her bearings – hope she made it safely to the Arboretum if she was planning on taking her brood for a swimming lesson – aaahhhh!! across all those busy roads!!!

    Like

  16. andyuk says:

    a juvenile starling brought in at 9am. but it didnt go far. one chick got the head and carried it to a corner but she? eventually gave up trying to eat it and left it. after the feed, mum spotted it and gave it to a chick, which toyed with it for a long time, trying not very effectively to bite bits off. im not sure if it got eaten in the end.

    Like

  17. Nick says:

    I think Sue has given us the perfect name for the 4th chick – “Titch” 🙂

    Like

  18. That little un can certainly eat when it puts its mind to it! Big chunks too, and its taken to helping itself at times….
    One of the bigger chicks keeps going right to the edge of the box to look over…..makes me wonder if its starting to think “now can I get up on that ledge or not?”

    Like

  19. Fred says:

    It is good to see them all growing so fast with the pin feathers now coming through so well. The youngest is not out of the wood yet I fear. Any down turn in the food supply and he will suffer. I saw ‘him’ earlier today struggling to get much, but he did in the end. His strategy seems to be let the ‘Ugly Sisters’ grab what they can and then step in while they choke it down for his share.
    With the feathers coming through and little wings now being used to help them walk on feet and not elbows, fledging must be the next milestone.
    Anyone want to start a book on when the first and last ones take their first flights? Usually any time between 35 – 42 days. 23rd April would take it to 28th May to 4th June. Looking at the rate of growth of Princess Pushy I would take 30th May for her and 5th June for Tiny Tim (akas Titch/George/Henry).
    “Wrong Bets” to pay a fiver to Notts Wildlife Trust? Any takers?

    Like

  20. Looks like another sunny day in Nottingham….the chicks are all piled up together sound asleep with one of the parents sat on the ledge keeping an eye on them..

    Like

  21. susan says:

    I guess they are ringed though can’t see the rings yet as the chicks are all in a feathery pile, exhausted after their ordeal!

    Like

  22. Julie Nowicki says:

    When will we know what sex they are?

    Like

  23. I cant wait to find out what sex they all are 🙂

    Like

  24. andyuk says:

    the 4 chicks look ok after their ordeal with the giant mutant peregrines lol. they seem to be going from strength to strength.

    i probably shouldnt post about another webcam here, but anyone else here watching the ‘sparrowhawk island; sparrowhawk camera. i only started watching yesterday. its has good quality picture. thing is, i noticed it was the male incubating (if i have the ID correct) which i thought was odd as female is supposed to incubate. and today there is still no sign of the female. i thought it was just an oddly coloured female at first but now i think its definitely the male. he occasionally flies away calling agitatedly and sometimes comes back with a prey item before resuming incubation of the 4 eggs. where is the female? i suspect an unfolding nest based tragedy! 😦

    Like

    • SueAtt says:

      Haven’t seen the sparrowhawk cam andyuk, but that doesn’t sound good. Seem to remember something similar happening a few years ago, on Springwatch I think, when one of the adult birds was killed – I think then, the eggs had already hatched, but I don’t remember if the lone adult managed to continue caring for the chicks, or if any survived.

      So sad 😦

      Like

      • andyuk says:

        thanks for reply sue. just to follow this up, i looked today and there are now clearly 5 eggs so unless the male can lay eggs, i was completely wrong in my interpretation of events lol.

        and very glad to be wrong too. its still very odd though, as the sitting bird (its presumably been the hen all the time) looks very like a male bird, with its bluish back and orange coloured breast feathers. the hen is normally quite brown without the orange breast feathers. and where is the male? ive seen no evidence of both together. maybe hes just very quiet.

        anyway, its lovely clear picture , (as on this camera), so should be a joy to observe them over the next few weeks.

        Like

  25. Tim Dev says:

    Are they taken one at a time and put back, or all 4 at once when ringed?

    Like

    • geebee7 says:

      I think they do it all at once. They usually turn of the camera.

      Like

      • Janet Gurnhill says:

        I think the camera did get switched off this morning as the whole camera set up vanished of the screen. I thought it was my computer gone wrong. I tried several times but gave as I had to go out. But jut got back to find a post on my email to find out that they had been ringing them all this morning. I do feel sorry for the little one.

        Like

  26. Pam Birley says:

    I wondered why I couldn’t access the cam this morning but now I realize it was while they were ringed. Look forward to details of ring numbers, sex of chicks etc.

    Like

  27. Janet Gurnhill says:

    I think Georgie or Georgie Girl would be apt name for one of the three females who all hatched on St.George’s Day. I also like titch for the little one

    Like

  28. Looking at the Nottingham Chicks and then the Chicks on the Seattle ( USA) – webcam, I was surprised to see how much more further-on the UK chicks are.

    Like

  29. Cockney Nomad says:

    Good to see the 4 of them thriving, especially with the sad news of one of Derby falcon chicks. As to suggested names, wondered how apt Newton might be for the little one, for 2 reasons: they are on the Newton Building and he/she could be named after singer/songwriter Newton Faulkner whose name, coincidentally, seems to almost describe the chicks and their location. As to the girls, I also thought April would be nice, perhaps with May and June for her sisters.

    Like

  30. Neal says:

    Not a sign of any chicks at 08.00hrs GMT this morning. Gone for a test run behind the cameras further down the parapet? I hope it is just a stroll they’ve taken.

    Like

  31. Cyril says:

    What are the small plastic objects in the nest? Green and yellow and red coloured objects are clearly visible.

    Like

    • b johnson says:

      Racing pigeon rings off the same kind of birds which helped to save the lives of airmen and soldiers during world war 1 and 2 by delivering messages giving locations so they could be rescued

      Like

      • Cyril says:

        I thought that was what they were but I didn’t like to say… So they feed on expensive racing pigeons, not street pigeons. I’m sure the owners were very disappointed that the pigeons did not return from a race or training flight. Them seem to have killed quite a few racing pigeons judging by the amount of rings visible at different times. Also someone must regularly remove these coloured rings from the falcons nest as they are only visible for a few days?

        Like

  32. Chris Dacosta says:

    Poor little birds that is really upsetting… that racing pigeons are being killed whilst out flying. I bet their owners are extremely upset.. surely the rings should be reported to the relevant authorities so that there owners could be told of their birds sad demise. I thought it was illegal to kill a racing pigeon, are they not protected ? i know people have been taken to court for shooting of racing pigeons.

    Like

  33. m.ingram says:

    They are great too watch,i can spend hours just watching them.How many pairs are there in the uk now? The young birds look in fine fettle.How many birds do the hawks have to kill to feed a nest of 4 young?Did notice a lot of coloured rings in the nest my self,did not know they were from racing pigeons.

    Like

  34. Linda Joneli says:

    I notice that people are referring to the pigeons that are being eaten are “street pigeons” is this a blind, to cover the fact that these peregrines are decimating peoples racing pigeons. I’m sure they know full well what the script is

    Like

  35. bertie says:

    so do they kill someone’s own pets like racing pigeons , is that legal ?can any bird or animal kill racing pigeons I thought that would be illegal

    Like

  36. Linda Joneli says:

    Can a person who is in the know about this nest annotate what happens to the racing pigeon rings found on this site, are the numbers recorded and reported to The Royal Pigeon Racing Association, thankyou

    Like

  37. robbie says:

    they remove the racing pigeon rings then say that they dont eat and attack racing pigeons, they cover there tracks, thats why you dont see many songbirds about anymore aswell cos these predators are wipeing them out, the queen should step in as she races pigeons aswell, putting boxes on building ledges is not natural for these predators cliff tops are, people forget how many lives racing pigeons saved in the wars

    Like

    • b johnson says:

      by putting boxes up to attract peregrines to town centres is not natural evolution but if they come and nest on the ledges available is,but when eagle owls started breeding naturally in this country the RSPB allegedly said they should be culled because they were not a native bird but I would have called it natural evolution and a case of double standards .

      Like

  38. Tony Ellis says:

    Are these rings then not the property of their registered keeper ?
    Im sure they would like to know the fate of their birds ?

    Wonder if they could be reported to the pigeon racing authority ?
    Im sure there must be some value to these birds .

    Like

    • robbie says:

      yes they can be reported to the royal pigeon racing association, and yes there is some value, some people just do not see what damage these peregrines actually do! song birds numbers falling and dont believe the nonsense of oh thats because of cats! its because of these killing machines!!

      Like

      • Cyril says:

        Oh I’m feeling a bit sickened now at the thoughts of them eating so many peoples pet pigeons. I’m sure the owners really miss their pigeons and I’d imagine the owners have spent quite a lot of money rearing their pigeons. I know what a valuable role racing pigeons played in the war, saving many downed aircraft and trapped allied forces.

        I read that some pigeons were even awarded medals for bravery. Is this true?

        Like

      • geebee7 says:

        I love all animals and hate to see them killed but it seems that pigeons seem to be the favourite meal of these falcons perhaps it is because they fly high unlike the little birds.

        Liked by 1 person

  39. bertie says:

    can I ask do the pigeons they kill not have youngsters of there own that will now die a horrible death

    Liked by 1 person

  40. darren says:

    the anoraks of society who enjoy the white knuckle ride of seeing innocent birds decimated by birds of prey need to adopt some compassion to the individuals who actually care for their pets on a daily basis ie pigeon fanciers …it seems to be a war of attrition between the two factions and will be to the detriment of this countrys songbirds …hang your heads in shame

    Liked by 1 person

  41. les says:

    Like Robbie said pigeons safed life’s in the war ,I know these killing machines have to eat but you should see the mess they make of the birds that they hit in the sky and they get away just to die a painfull death because there guts are hanging out,great to watch these kill our racing pigeon that we have watch and grow from baby’s I hope it gives you hawk lovers a buzz yours in sport les cross from gosport.

    Like

  42. geebee7 says:

    Forgot to say that they are catching more at the moment to feed the babies. I read somewhere that normally they only have one meal a day. Falcons know no better unlike humans who will merrily munch through a steak not knowing if the animal has suffered first. And no I don’t eat meat.

    Liked by 1 person

  43. peter davenport (re,bird brain) says:

    do these raptors eat anything else besides pigeons and songbirds, i can clearly see 6 or 7 pigeon rings in the nest, will these rings get collected up and owners notified of what as happened to their birds, and what is natural about an artificial man made nest in the middle of a city.

    Liked by 1 person

    • geebee7 says:

      As far as I remember from past times they are collected and the owners informed. Mr and Mrs P chose this site themselves it was just made more comfortable for them and their babies.

      Like

      • peter davenport (re,bird brain) says:

        hope so for the uni,s sake as once these rings are collected up knowing full well they belong to someone whos racing pigeon that they lovingly reared at a lot of expense as just been ripped apart while still alive by one of these killing machines becomes theft and the uni could be charged with handling stolen property, as for just making the site more comfortable, everything about the site is artificial from the nest bedding to the neatly placed timber to hold it all together, and when does advertising make a peregrine nest more comfortable.

        Like

  44. wayne-uk-01 says:

    Just wondered?If theres about 100,000 different pairs of different hawks sparrow/peregrine/merlin etc and they kill about 3/4 birds,how does nature keep up with there numbers,400,000 birds lost?.Please enlighten me surely im wrong arnt i.

    Like

  45. wayne-uk-01 says:

    And that’s a day?when feeding there young!isnt it.

    Like

  46. wayne-uk-01 says:

    Les regarding your comment!i love hawks,and they have a right to exist as well!,But I have to agree there has to be a balance!,There appears to be too many at present,I think the rspb have made a poor assessment of there numbers,and I see there un natuarly being introduced in citys etc,.

    Liked by 1 person

  47. Brian Craven says:

    My neighbour has a very nice bird table where he enjoyed feeding the song birds he no longer does this as he says he is sick of watching the hawks tear them apart. He says it has become a feeding table for these predators and the songbirds are not around like they used to be.
    I am a pigeon fancier and only last week watched a hawk tear the head off a six week old youngster before I could prevent it.

    Like

  48. jonny lang says:

    wow just came on too have a look at the chicks so many pigeon rings in the nest I really feel for the owners of the pigeons its barbaric the amount of racing pigeons killed by these preditors and I think its true about the song birds havnt heard or seen a song thrush in our area for years but seen plenty of s-hawks an falcons, its a shame that chris packham and co prefer looking at raptors sooner than hear songbirds jmo

    Like

  49. b johnson says:

    the Dicken medal was awarded to over 30 pigeons for services in world wars, also there was a bounty on peregrines paid by the government so as to try and safeguard pigeons returning with messages,I suggest you read a book called ”Pigeons in Two World Wars” or another one called ”They also Served” The Dicken medal was recently awarded to a bomb disposal dog who died with his handler when try to find a bomb,it is also known as the animal V.C

    Like

    • geebee7 says:

      I know about the Dicken medal and how the pigeons flew with messages. The poor animals that go ‘to war’ have no say in the matter and deserve awards for being brave. When I think of all the horses that were killed in the first world war it breaks my heart.

      Please don’t think we are pigeon haters on here.

      Like

  50. When the nest is emptied of rings why are the police or an officer from one of the pigeon unions not invited along to oversee the collection of them as the belong to someone and to destroy or dispose of property that can be identified is illegal and classed as theft .

    Like

  51. Pete, Manchester says:

    Sadly the general public’s view on pigeons, is no more than a flying rat, whilst the hawk is seen as a thing of beauty, no amount of good PR on behalf of the Racing Pigeon, will change that, Peregrine numbers have increased significantly over the last decade, with the assistance of nesting sites such as this , what will happen when we reach saturation point ? .

    Like

    • matt says:

      My wife would spend hours watching birds in our back garden but now after 2 years of birds of prey eating alive anything that flys weve taken away our 4 bird tables. Its horrible to watch and something needs to be done asap to cut the numbers or our birds are doomed in this country. We shouldnt be messing with nature and putting up boxes in our citys, i no they need to eat as we all do but there are way to many these days. Thanks matt

      Like

    • geebee7 says:

      I do not see them as flying rats.

      I feed the birds on a old table near my window and the same three pigeons come down to be fed twice a day when I call the birds with a clicking noise.

      They can be very bossy to the smaller birds who eat the same seed as they do. The blackbirds seem to be able to munch on the live meal worms without any problem.

      I saw on one of the news programmes that the reason there are so many pigeons around is because of all the discarded food. The ‘pest exterminator’ actually said that there was no point in trying to kill them as they would have more chicks and the best way to limit them is reducing their perching places and making sure there is no waste food lying around.

      I hate seeing them with injured limbs the poor souls must be in agony.

      I had a racing pigeon in my garden one Sunday, I gave him some seed and then moved heaven and earth to find a ‘pigeon fancier’ near to where I live. Eventually I found one who took said pigeon home. It turned out it was from up North ( I live in Pembrokeshire) and had decided to stop for a rest in my garden. It’s owner asked for it to be transported back to his home and it was.

      Like

  52. geebee7 says:

    The rings are collected and the pigeon authorities informed. I can’t say for certain but when a falcon hurtles out of the sky at full speed and grabs a pigeon I wouldn’t be surprised if the poor pigeon has a heart attack and dies immediately and is not ripped apart live.

    I like pigeons (as I love all animals) and when I feed the birds twice a day they come for their food and I don’t show favouritism.

    Like

  53. jimmy hamilton says:

    Everything has a right to live and that includes all birds of prey but we as humans are no effecting the balance in more ways that one .For a start off the peregrine falcon is a bird of the sea cliffs and mountain cliffs but we have now introduced them into our towns and city’s .Many years ago we would only see a peregrine falcon if we went to visit the areas where they lived but now we see them on a daily basis in and around our towns .Where I live I used to love watching the kestrels hovering in the wind as they hunted for small rodents and insects but the peregrines have wiped them out in our area as I have seen kestrels hovering and a peregrine just dives on it and cuts its head off in mid air .All our small birds are disappearing and yet we see sparrow hawks and peregrines everywhere.I have given up feeding the small birds in my garden as I could no longer watch as the sparrow hawks waited for them and then eat them alive . Some thing has to be done as the balance is gone wrong in my opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

  54. They are beutifull birds but as I live on Anglesey I have seen the terrible consequences of there increase in numbers they wiped out 800 pairs of Rosette Tern on the island the biggest colony in the world all wiped out by the 14 pairs that lived here. Would not like to see them culled but they should not release captive bred birds in to city’s where they do not belong.

    Liked by 1 person

  55. Linda Joneli says:

    Pete, try telling that to the eleven hundred British Servicemen who lives were saved by GI Joe a racing pigeon who flew 20 miles in 20 minutes

    Like

  56. Linda Joneli says:

    The British 56th Brigade was scheduled to attack the city of Colvi Vecchia, Italy, at 10 a.m., October 18, 1943. The U.S. Air Support Command was scheduled to bomb the city to soften the entrance for the British Brigade. The Germans retreated, leaving only a small rear guard, and as a result the British troops entered the city with little resistance and occupied it ahead of schedule.

    All attempts to cancel the bombings of the city, made by radio and other means of communication, had failed. Little “G.I.JOE” was released with the important message to cancel the bombing. He flew 20 miles back to the U.S. Air Support Command base in 20 minutes, and arrived just as our planes were warming up to take off. If he had arrived a few minutes later it might have been a different story.

    General Mark Clark, Commanding the U.S. Fifth Army, estimated that “G.I.JOE” saved the lives of at least 1,000 of our British allies

    Like

  57. m brown says:

    surely a list of pigeon rings should be put on this very website so that any local owners know of the sad demise of their racing pigeon/s, i know of a peregrine nesting site that after they had done rearing for the year, in around the nest was emptied of racing pigeon rings and there was just over 100 and that was from a single year so are the ones from this one being reported ? as its quite obvious they are getting removed as they are there one day and gone the nest and see the number of rings building up daily, i may contact the rpra, nehu,nwhu and shu to see if there are any reports from this breeding site

    Like

  58. mick says:

    Just so most of the pigeon men on here know yes pigeons served in the wars but the falcons did also. They where the ones who stopped enemy messages being transport back to enemy HQ so both birds played there part. I know its un fair when your prized pigeons are taken but when your pigeons are out they are in the wild and fair game to other predators. Its the same as letting your dog out the front door to wander the streets it could be hit by a car and killed or attacked by another dog ,thats the risk you take.

    Like

    • matt says:

      Mick i think your missing the point, the point is there are to many birds of prey and are wiping out our native birds quicker than you think. As you said if there out fair game but what are these falcons doing in and around wolverhampton town centre its smack in the middle of the country and these birds are from cliffs around the coasts? Weve got to stop messing with nature and putting boxes up everywhere and before you say it no i’m not a pigeon flyer i’m just a man who loves our wildlife but i’m afraid there wont be much of it soon. Thanks matt

      Like

    • Cyril says:

      Sorry Mick but it doesn’t see you’d feel much sadness or remorse if your pet dog was destroyed by another dog or crushed to death by a car? That’s very heartless. I’m sure the pigeon men feel very sorry at the loss of their prized birds, many of which are quite valuable. I’m also sure if there was a predator killing and eating race horses something would be quickly done about it! This all seems to be an unnatural increasing in the numbers of raptors to a point where they are decimating both the song bird and racing pigeon populations.

      Like

    • Dave Bycroft says:

      You’ve hit the nail on the head there. In the wild. The city center is NOT a natural site for these birds.

      Like

  59. andy says:

    mick I said that very same thing last night

    Like

  60. darren says:

    would that be said for any pet out in public mick…what a ridiculous statement to make as has already been stated the meddling with nature is upsetting the balance and these nest sites are being put in un-natural sites.most pigeon fanciers would accept losing a few birds a year to birds of prey but its out of hand now its not the only species slowly being eaten alive to its extinction ….a typical bop lovers reply just remember the rspb are meant to be their for all bird species not just their favourites and I think the public are beginning to realise this for themselves as many I have spoken to no longer have bird tables or feeders in their garden due to the horrible site of seeing songbirds being eaten alive in their back gardens.spring watch winter watch not one showing of a bird of prey killing a live bird now come on just who do they think they are kidding …its shameful and so are your comments to suggest peoples pets and enjoyment of watching song birds in their own garden are fair game

    Like

  61. Chris Dacosta says:

    Im affraid although these birds are nice, they are causing a lot of upset to young children who have to watch as these birds not only catch but rip apart their prey alive. My son has recently been a victim while standing in the garden.. he loves his birds and a sparrow hawk hit a bird in our garden, the poor bird was screathing at the top of its lungs the most horrendous painful noise i have ever heard, almost like the screams from some torture horror movie like SAW. any way my 2 and half year son stood there in shock sobbing his heart out as the hawk ripped the bird apart piece by piece until it took its last breath which was a good five minutes. what was left was a skeleton on a bird mutilated, including the head which had been pulled from its neck.
    My son bless him didnt stop sobbing for hours and will not go out in the garden now as he is too upset. He also has been having nightmares..and i would say it was all down to the sparrow hawk.
    I think enough is enough now RSPB, the hawks however beautiful and splendid they are…are well out of control now. Next they will be taking childrens pets from the garden too.
    Is there some sort of law that that allows me to stop this happening in my garden, to stop the grief my family is going through, as the sparrow hawk is still coming back to the bird table and doing the same on a regular basis. All i want is a beautiful garden with lots of lovely birds in it..not a killing machine and my garden looking like something from Texas chainsaw massacre.

    Help please.

    Like

  62. Annette Tomlinson says:

    This might sound a silly question but why build a nest for these birds if they are not in decline just wandering

    Like

  63. Tammy Brown says:

    Reading this blog today I never realised the damage these peregrines are doing to all our much loved native bird species. Tammy

    Liked by 1 person

  64. Pete, Manchester says:

    Mick, If the Falcons cleared the town centres of feral pigeons, then I wouldn’t have a problem, surely this was the reason for siting the nests there ? however they are targeting domestic breeds, obviously they recognise a healthy specimen when they see one, they are hardly going to choose a sickly disease ridden bird for their meal, they are more intelligent than that. why not site the nests around the rubbish tips and rid the masses of seagulls that congregate ? .

    Like

  65. mick says:

    Okay lads before you all decide to have a go I keep pigeons myself and have lost some to hawks so dont go judging before you know the facts. Why do you think there is alot of birds of prey around ? Because there is a large food source , if they hadnt got a large source then they wouldnt be able to feed chicks so there must be a good supply of food no???? If the food wasnt there “other birds”the numbers of birds of prey wouldnt be as high and the birds of prey would die off a sort of plateau effect. Also birds of prey hold territories and one pair cover an area. Now how many cats live in a bird of preys territory and how many magpies? Do the science. Yes they hunt and kill other animals and its to survive they dont kill for the fun but your domestic cat kills and plays with there food. And no im not against cats. Just facts.
    The nest boxs that are put up yes give a peregrine a place to nest but they will find a place with or without mans help. Its an ongoing battle and all you try to do is co exist. Ive lost pigeons and I know others have , its nature the predator eats the prey. So you cant say its cuel they eat to stay alive not for the fun of it.

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  66. Chris Dacosta says:

    Hi Mick how can i stop this sparrow hawk from killing all the birds in my garden,its getting out of hand. We were never subjected to these horrific scenes as children and i dont particularly want my kids to keep seeing it in their garden. There must be some sort of law of human rights that enables us to protect our children from such horrible graphic scenes in our own gardens. Im sure if there were dogs on the street killing other animals then they would soon be removed and put to sleep.
    What do you advise me to do. Are there any predators that hunt the sparrow hawk or peregrine that could be brought in to control such a situation ?

    Like

    • mick says:

      .Again “human rights” your not talking about humans killing. And cruelty is a man made word, To enjoy the suffering of others . Birds of prey dont take enjoyment from it they take survival and life.
      To solve the problem teach your child about survival of the fittest and the food chain. What would your solution be????

      Like

  67. darren says:

    mick that’s all very well what about human nature and mans instinct to protect what he holds dear especially in the vicinity of his own garden….if you don’t want people to have a go then don’t be so flippant with what people hold dear,and don’t avoid the fact that certain native species of song birds are being eaten to extinction the cuckoo…roseate tern common sparrow which is no longer common I remember seeing fantastic sites as a child of a few hundred sparrows making swirling shapes in the sky but alas no more you can hoodwink all you like but its all coming home to roost the truth is being realised that the the money making machine that is the rspb and its hierarchy are obsessed with birds of prey ,if you like the thrill of the white knuckle ride of viewing live kills why not take up boxing

    Like

    • darren says:

      sorry that should say starling displays remember these

      Like

    • mick says:

      . The birds you mention migrate no???? Well in other countries birds arent as well protected as they are here and are trapped for food and shot along there travel paths if you care to look it up.they also die from bad weather ,lack of food sources many different reasons. And down to human interference. This would explain alot no. Im just giving facts that are out there. There will always be a question followed by an answer and around and around we go. Peoples prized birds are taken but who was here first. We have no claim to the sky. As I said ive lost birds primarily to sparrowhawks and thats the way it goes, many a pigeon man spends hours staring at the sky waiting for a pigeon to return with no result. Immediately to blame is the trusty bird of prey no??? I am a animal lover and dont take sides. Again most comments put up have a sinister side to them or twisted to make birds of prey out to be the bad problem, who stands up for them? Well the majority of the public and the government by protecting them.

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  68. Chris Dacosta says:

    Mick, Sorry do not agree with your comments it definately isnt ok for a child to see this kind of graphic imagery in real life on a regular basis. and why should i have to teach my child about killing things.

    You fail to answer my original question what predator hunts the perigrine or sparrow hawk in the grand eco system ?

    Like

  69. Jackson Ward says:

    When the current songbird population has been totally decimated (we are on the way there now), the hawks have eaten all the pigeons, what do they do next eat each other? There are so many numbers already that eventually there will be a problem with territories and birds nesting in another pairs area. What will the conservationists do then, start to cull the numbers like the parakeets who have naturalised in this country, but are now perceived as a threat. The same thing with any other species which grows in numbers, that’s ok let’s kill them all as long as they’re not raptors. Double standards in protecting a species which is killing everything else, when it’s not the RSPB (which is supposed to help all birds not just the chosen few) decide a certain breed needs culling!! Who are they to decide, we are told time and again it’s nature leave them be, so this rule should apply to all other birds not just their precious raptors.

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  70. Chris Dacosta says:

    Is there something i can feed on the bird table to the wild birds that will make them un appealing in taste to the rogue hawk ?

    Like

  71. Chris Dacosta says:

    Or am i allowed to catch the hawk and have it taken to a hawk sanctuary ? as its becoming a nuisance.

    Like

  72. darren says:

    just as I thought mick more drivel from a bop lover …hiding behind heresay and facts only made by the rspb …its like regulating yourself what a joke we need a independent survey to show the true numbers and mick seeing is believing and people have had enough of bops not everyone has a thirst for blood some of us like the finer things in life like peace and tranquillity in wildlife …and watching innocence instead of destruction and I sincerely question your claim to house pigeons yourself it just don’t add up another cloak and dagger claim

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  73. darren says:

    mick what about human nature and mans instinct to protect his own ….you go on about nature but expect mans nature to be supressed so that your beloved birds of prey can eat and you can view the carnage ….I am sick and tired of witnessing it in my own back garden and not being able to connect with nature and birdlife in my own home,society gone mad I feel ….maybe a introduction of the eagle owl may even up the balance a little in favour of the songbirds and don’t tell me they are not native to this country because they certainly were albeit some time ago but the rspb gets to decide who survives and who does not and whats natural about that

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  74. Linda Joneli says:

    What really is totally annoying, is that PETA are very vocal against pigeon flyers – especially for loosing birds on races. It is quite obvious from your web cam pictures of all the pigeon rings in an around the nest. Multiply this by by every raptor nest in the Country and it seems to me that pigeon flyers are getting a bum rap from PETA

    Like

  75. Tammy Brown says:

    I was talking with a friend this evening about the falcons and this blog. She was at a wedding last weekend where a basket of beautiful white doves were released to celebrate the marriage.
    As they flew in the sky a large bird dived into them and carried one away with blood dripping from it. The others flew into some nearby thorn bushes and there were white feathers everywhere. The man who released them said it was a ‘hawk attack’ and that none of his beloved doves would make it back home. Could this have been a falcon?

    Like

  76. Linda Joneli says:

    Indeed it could

    Like

  77. darren says:

    mick are you not engaging in the conversation any more …tammy it has all the hallmarks of a peregrine falcon attack these magnificent creatures are totally out of hand in our country now even before this very mild winter Cumbria had the densest population in Europe of peregrine falcons …not bad for a little island like ours and yet these man made nest sites are popping up everywhere,look at the mess the carnage its shameful it really is and I sympathise that your friends wedding was ruined by such a ugly site but you can expect more of the same unfortunately and it will get much worse before it gets better in fact I think these obstinate fanatical bop lovers will cause irreversible damage to our birdlife in this country and already have and they will turn every stone ,draw every curtain around every little excuse and try and hoodwink the public with self governed studies and people in high places.the rspb is interested in one thing “money” fact

    Like

  78. m.ingram says:

    Hi
    Just been reading through all the comments.I have asked a question on anther site.How many hawks nest are there in notts/derbys & were are they.Well the amount of nest sites were the hawks are breeding on this question surprised me.I thought the birds were being protected because their numbers are low.Not according to the replys.
    As stated I love to watch the birds on the webb cams,but I much prefer to see them flying in the country side.The man made nest,s are going against nature only my opinion.
    I did not realise that the hawks ate so many racing pigeons,song birds etc.
    Still as said I do love to see them in all their natural surroundings.
    Marin

    Like

  79. peter davenport (re,bird brain) says:

    if as you say you collect the rings in the nest im sure a lot of people on this blog would like to know just how many you have collected, i can see at least 6 new rings, 4 being life rings and 2 ets rings, so thats at least 4 more racing pigeons that wont be getting home.

    Like

  80. Cyril says:

    I see lots of coloured rings left behind in the nest now…

    Some are still attached to the poor pigeons legs! 😦 Yeuck

    Like

    • geebee7 says:

      I too find this very upsetting but falcons don’t know any different.

      Like

      • peter davenport (re,bird brain) says:

        very true, falcons dont know any better and are only doing what comes naturally, but people do and keep building these artificial nest sites in unnatural locations which only encourages these killing machines into towns and citys .

        Like

  81. darren says:

    but people know the difference and these nest sites should be left natural let the falcons make their own nests they are not city dwellers by nature …this is the point its people messing with nature and those people being disrespectful to oter peoples hobbys and pets and enjoyment in their own gardens ie feeding wild birds

    Like

  82. wink says:

    Strikes me we have an academic intolerance of true rural knowledge going on here,these raptors have become the golden goose of a large bird charity,

    Like

  83. CW says:

    I enjoy and have an interest in all wild birds and support their welfare best I can.
    Surely Nottingham University have a social responsibility here!!! I know for sure they will have policies on their students and staff, their welfare and wellbeing, and the impact these people have on the local services and infrastructure in the area.
    By the same token they should have a consideration of the welfare of local bird-life, enthusiasts or keepers of any birds under “attack” by allowing and actively encouraging the the hawks to use their buildings.
    I certainly don’t think it’s good publicity for any University, School or public service to be supporting such an activity especially in an era of diversity, tolerance and conservation. I feel they may well not have been fully aware of their actions at the onset, probably encouraged by another organisation, and thought they were doing their bit to help an “endangered” falcon, but they need to realise the truth now, understand the damage they are caught up in, do the right thing and take action.

    Like

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