Why we cannot intervene

The 4th chick outside the nestbox

The 4th chick outside the nest box

 

Thank you for all the messages.   Like so many of you, we are also very concerned for the young falcon chick, but please understand that we cannot intervene.

We only ever access the nest for the annual ringing, which is to help ensure the protection of the peregrine falcon species. If we were to repeatedly interfere with the nest there would be the possibility that the adults may abandon it and any remaining chicks. This is based on the advice of professionals.

In the wild, in more rural nest sites, it is common for chicks to perish by falling from the nest, often being bullied by its larger siblings.  Our falcons are wild too, and we must let nature take its course and hope for the best.  It is also worth noting that the female is perfectly capable of continuing to feed it if she chooses to and the ledge is actually wider than in some rural sites.

The nest box was installed on a site which had already been chosen by the falcons.  It was installed by the university and the wildlife trust to prevent eggs being washed away in times of heavy rainfall.  The site has been incredibly successful for many years with twenty birds successfully fledging over the past six years.  As ever, at the end of every season we will review how our project has performed.  This always includes a review of the nest box itself and the ringing.

In 2012 during the heavy storms we received hundreds of requests to rescue the birds.  We did not intervene, despite losing three chicks.  It was incredibly difficult to watch, however when one chick managed to survive we felt privileged to have witnessed such a battle.

 

 

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386 Responses to Why we cannot intervene

  1. susanbloor says:

    Thanks for letting us know. Good luck to the poor little thing.

    Like

    • Jackson Ward says:

      What a disgusting mess on such lovely buildings, with all the dead bodies around and the amount of excrement daily, surely this is a health hazard the councils should look at.

      Like

    • Jackson Ward says:

      You’ve already intervened by putting up false nesting sites for them which are not their natural habitat.

      Like

      • Lynn Pope says:

        I think you need to get your facts right before you post such negative comments. This nesting box was only put where it is because the birds were already nesting in this gutter and with such heavy rain etc. the fear was the eggs would get washed along the gutter. The birds themselves chose this site in the first place. I am all for nature and giving these beautiful birds a fighting chance. The university does a fantastic job along side the wildlife trust and I for one am very happy that they do. I’m also not worried about my health as this site is well above any public footpath and although it looks like there is a pavement directly below, the fact is it is also a distance form the pavement and below is the university grounds.
        Keep up the great work NTU

        Like

      • Jackson Ward says:

        So you admit Lynn Pope that they have already intervened by putting a nesting box up in a place the birds didn’t choose to nest themselves, in your words “the birds were already nesting in this gutter” so you have messed around with an existing nest to get better results for your webcams! It’s not rubbish at all Ian, councils and preservation societies spend millions of pounds every year on maintaining and upgrading listed buildings, if these were scruffy pigeons there would be an outcry and the peregrines and sparrowhawks would be brought in to get rid of them all, double standards I think.

        Like

      • Lynn Pope says:

        Jackson Ward can you not read, they DID choose this site themselves, Why are you even on this site you obviously don’t like them so go away and leave us that do to enjoy watching.

        Like

      • steve says:

        These Birds where actually nesting on the other side of the uni when they 1st took up residence on the building i remember it well lots of ppl came to view them on Goldsmith street…. The wildlife trust then decided to encourage them to stay by putting up a man made box for them to nest in on the other side of the uni where it is now so they have interfered in my opinion with nature take away the man made box and lets see nature take it’s course… You are correct Jackson Ward they have intervened.

        Like

  2. susan says:

    Well said. Difficult though it is to watch, too much interference could worsen things considerably.
    Keep up the good work.

    Like

    • Thank you for the email. Your policy is correct – I watch with hope.

      Like

      • Molly Spriggs says:

        Yes thank you for your explanation which of course is so correct,we can only pray the little explorer will get back in where /he/she belongs ……maybe that one could be named Explorer Dora ?????

        Like

      • geebee7 says:

        All life is sacred, I won’t even kill a snail. Spiders, moths, flies etc go outside in a spider trap. I adore animals and it breaks my heart seeing this poor soul.

        Like

  3. Alison says:

    During the course of the morning the little chick has been fed a little, and one of the parents even took its catch onto the ledge as if to try to coax it back into the box. I have watched this nest site since the first year of the cameras and chicks have often ‘got stuck’ on the wrong side. I have never seen one fail to get back into the nest eventually. There is still hope for this little one.

    Like

  4. Melonie Pickering says:

    Thanks Grant….I’m sure the little one will get the idea soon….there were similar moments last year too so we just need to show patience….you can’t intervene or you would have to do so every time a chick got into difficulties…this is nature as it should be..cruel yet wondrous

    Like

  5. Thanks Grant…..I’m sure the little one will get the idea soon…..you can’t intervene or you will be doing it every time one of the chicks gets out of the box

    Like

  6. Thanks Grant…, this happened last year too but they do get back in the box eventually, just takes a bit of time…..

    Like

  7. Jacqueline says:

    12.08 and the outside one is getting a right good bellyful 🙂

    Like

    • EG says:

      That’s true. But he has also missed out on all the earlier feeds today. So this is effectively his first proper meal of the day 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  8. HFA says:

    Little one is currently being fed by dad, over the edge of the nest. Let’s hope he gets his strength up and soon strong enough to jump/flap back in.

    Like

  9. geebee7 says:

    I will have to stop watching if he looks distressed. 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  10. silverethers says:

    While I can accept your explanation about not intervening … I can’t help feeling if the box was not there he would be back with its siblings already … and what happens when it gets cold … very sad silver ether here…

    Like

  11. I can appreciate your explanation but cannot understand why it is OK to “intervene” to ring these chicks, but not OK to help it back into the nest. Surely the more falcons who fledge , the better for the falcon population. It isn’t just these wee chick who is distressed ………

    Liked by 2 people

  12. silverethers says:

    Yes geebee I agree 😦 if he had fallen from the nest in nature .. it prolly would not have survived the fall or it would have been snapped up for lunch very quickly … no need to treat him this way …

    Like

  13. Nature is very cruel,but breeds no matter what survive,I feel very privaliged to be able to watch,
    And as sad as it is on occasions the NTU & NWT are doing the right things in letting nature take its course

    Like

  14. Jenny Martin says:

    I can understand you not intervening to remove chicks from nest if in difficulty but cannot understand why you will not just help the little one back to join its sisters or maybe just put a brick or something beside the nest so it can help it get back in itself

    Like

  15. Tim Dev says:

    Correct me if I’m wrong Grant, but haven’t you put back chics into the nest who have accidentally fallen off the edge and down to the pavement?

    Have the laws changed in terms of interfering?

    I’m not being facetious, just curious as to what if anything may have changed law wise.

    Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m sure the little one will sort itself out soon and get back in the box with the others……….we just have to be patient and understand that what we have been told is the right way of doing things, because a licence i required to ring the chicks and the same would apply to resolving issues like this….

    Like

  17. susan herapath says:

    hi, i had not checked in to the peregrines today. is it the smallest one that has fallen out of the nest and is it still alive? and when did it happen? obviously you can not intervene, as some people would like, nature has to take its course and if you did the parents could desert. Has the fallen chick been fed where it is? with thanks , Sue Herapath

    Like

  18. Pam Birley says:

    I seem to remember a chick falling from Norwich cathedral and it was rescued and put back. I too would like to know if the law has changed.

    Like

    • steve says:

      Law as not changed NO these organisations such as RSPB Wildlife trusts etc etc make the rules up as they go along if it suits they will do what ever they doomed to be best….

      Like

  19. vicki says:

    I agree you cant intervene but a helping hand in the form of something to stand on would be better than watching her suffer. I cant bear to watch anymore Im afraid Im logging out.

    Like

    • david graham says:

      panic over, all four are now back safely in the nestbox, we worry too much?

      Like

      • geebee7 says:

        Worry is an understatement my Siamese cat has only got to cough a few times and I go into a panic attack. He is an indoor cat I couldn’t bare to let him outside with all the dangers there are.

        Like

  20. I’ve just been watching this little one desperately trying to climb / flutter back into the nest. Please be humane and help it.

    Like

  21. Fiona says:

    Just watched him jump back in! Amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. vicki says:

    yeeeyyyy she back in the nest

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Dee Crabb says:

    fantastic- just seen him jump back in

    Like

  24. Martyn. says:

    At exactly 14:15 i witnessed the little fella jump back in the nest box..great news..He had a few little attempts and then in with the rest of the chicks..drama over.

    Like

  25. Jacqueline says:

    S/he’s back in the fold! 😀

    Like

  26. Looks like he has found his way in …… Fantastic !!

    Like

  27. Ally says:

    He made it back into the box, feel privileged to see the special moment. Such a determined little fellow (sure it’s a male). I hope he survives now and has a long life. He’s certainly got spirit.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Eileen says:

    He is back isnt he if so I missed it one split second and i missed it

    Like

  29. Dave says:

    How did he get back? We’re calling him Darren here in the office and the big one is Big Sid, which has a nice ring to it!

    Like

  30. Can someone please post video of little Pip getting back in missed it

    Like

  31. Sue says:

    hooray – ‘he’ jumped back in after a few serious tries and a bit of a leap! – well done! He certainly is determined to survive. All that exertion’s worn him out.

    Like

  32. Jodie says:

    So glad she made it back to her brother(?) and sisters! Phew! 🙂

    Like

  33. I missed it because I was blogging on here ….. but hank you for the fab close up pictures just now. Now I can, and I suspect everyone else watching can breathe again …. happiness !

    Liked by 1 person

  34. billie says:

    Something tells me he/she might do it again now its had a taste of freedom. Lets hope its not so traumatic to the rest of us.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Eileen says:

    id love to see a video of him getting back in too…. any chance???

    Like

  36. billie says:

    Perhaps we should call it Pheonix, it certainly rose up like one

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Pat Wilcock says:

    Great to see him/her back in the nest.
    A suitable unisex name for this chick could be Hillary, after the mountineer & explorer.

    Like

  38. Jack D says:

    So relieved. Thank goodness but perhaps the nest box design does need a little modification for next season.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. geebee7 says:

    No he is defiantly a Horus a brave little boy.

    Like

  40. Jack Dawson says:

    awe bless wouldn’t it be nice if we could put a little fence round them to keep them safe and perhaps a couple of swings and slide to give them something to do

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Craig says:

    “Spirit” is another potential name for the small one.

    Like

  42. geebee7 says:

    I love the way they rest their little heads on the wooden surround…..bless them.

    Like

  43. RonJ says:

    Since I’m on the US west coast, GMT-8, I miss much of the early day but I see very early morning there. It was between 4:30-5AM that the baby chick jumped out of the nest, but he was not the first. His older sibling was flapping her wings and jumped up onto the edge of the nest, then jumped off to explore. Baby watched in rapt fascination as the larger bird wandered out of camera range.

    Ultimately the little guy decided to jump out too. I am convinced there’s no way he would have ‘fallen’ out of the nest if he hadn’t seen a sibling go first. They both wandered a bit, the the larger chick tried to get back into the nest. It wasn’t easy, even for her size, but she ultimately managed it. Poor baby chick was stuck, trying repeatedly and failing.

    When mother bird came with breakfast she concentrated on the chicks in the nest but ultimately did feed the baby quite liberally.

    But afterwards both parents just sat on the ledge and watched.

    I’m glad that baby chick made it back in while I was sleeping. Whew!

    Liked by 1 person

  44. mazzy says:

    Usually go straight to the webcam, but was too worried….came here and read the good news…well done little chap!

    Like

  45. billie says:

    Wait until there on the ledge, that will be heart stopping The little on keeps opening her beak but no sound comes out.

    Like

  46. Dee Crabb says:

    thanks for the photos

    Like

  47. laurence says:

    yea, escaped came back home !

    Like

  48. silverethers says:

    Thank you RonJ …. your our night shift guy then 🙂

    Like

  49. silverethers says:

    awww how nice all settled down after a scary day ..well I was scared

    Like

  50. Jack D says:

    I’ve been mulling over this question of intervention and would like to share a few thoughts. We intervene in the natural world all the time whether unintentionally, inadvertently or unavoidably. Here in Nottingham we have the widening of the A453 – huge swathes of the countryside have been bulldozed killing or displacing hundreds of creatures – unavoidable perhaps but devastating for the wildlife involved. We feed our birds in winter to help them through the leanest time of the year – we are intervening. We are encouraged to look out for under-weight hedgehogs in the autumn and take them to a Rescue Centre – without our intervention they wouldn’t survive the winter. I think you get my point – we cannot live in the modern world without affecting the creatures around us. The University and Wildlife Trust has already intervened in the lives of the Peregrines by installing a box – yes for their own good and the good of their eggs and no-one can argue with that but I can see absolutely no difference in intervening to pop the littlest chick back in the box if it was considered safe for the other chicks to do so. Thankfully this wasn’t necessary. Sometimes intervention is a force for good and helps to balance up the man-made damage we inflict on the natural world every day.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thistledo says:

      Jack D for PM!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Annie says:

      I absolutely agree with your comments,Jack,is there no way we can influence the principles of the University and Wildlife trust?

      Like

      • Jack D says:

        Personally I think each situation needs to be evaluated as and when it occurs. Sometimes it isn’t appropriate to intervene and sometimes it is but there should be the freedom to make that decision based on the situation rather than a sort of blanket ban on intervention – if that makes any sense.

        Like

    • jill says:

      nicely put… agreed 🙂

      Like

  51. Jack Dawson says:

    2 in the morning all babies safely piled up in nest, night watchman on duty on ledge

    Liked by 1 person

  52. Dianne Samaroo says:

    Hi,

    In Canada the University of Alberta last year intervened to save the life of the smallest chick in one of their nests after it wandered away. *Dr*. Gordon

    *Court raised the chick,please do not let the chick die.*

    *Cheers*

    *Dianne*

    Like

  53. Dianne says:

    This chick rocks!!!

    Like

  54. Nice to see we still have 4 chicks in the nestbox this morning….just wondering which will be next to go for a wander.. 🙂

    Like

  55. LD says:

    I recently watched the ringing of a dutch peregrine nest. They took the opportunity to quickly clear all the feathers, bones and other mess. The nest appeared pristine afterwards and far less attractive to disease and flies. Maybe our guys could do the same next year? A quick spring clean is desperately needed in this nest, it is worse this year than I remember it ever being.

    Liked by 1 person

  56. vicki says:

    One just gone

    Like

  57. billie says:

    I just saw one go over the top and stroll of. The big one is racing around the nest like Mo Farrah with a birds head in its beak. I agree with some intervention, why build a nest site, put in cameras in to follow the progress and enable people to watch. Go to the trouble of having them ringed and then watch them suffer when a little help is all that’s needed, surely that’s the whole point of conservation.

    Liked by 1 person

  58. Ziggy says:

    Oops there goes another one! lol

    To all the NTU staff who run monitoring this nest, I’d like to say a big thanks, I really appreciate it and am learning a lot about birds and their behaviours.

    Like

  59. Pam Birley says:

    Some screen caps from this morning. So interesting to watch their progress. https://www.flickr.com/photos/66339356@N00/

    Like

    • Margaret says:

      Oh Pam stunning screen caps, thanks so much

      Like

    • geebee7 says:

      I wonder if you’ve come to my neck of the woods (Pembrokeshire) we have lots of sea birds?

      Like

    • Jack D says:

      Pam – some stunning pictures there. Your knitted birds are just amazing – I love the Osprey ones.

      Like

    • Frances says:

      Pam your pics are beautiful. I just love the one you titled ‘shall we go’. It’s like he is saying ‘are you going first or me, or shall we go together’.

      Like

  60. 10.13 am, May 20th: one of the larger chicks has evidently decided to explore and is now dozing in the guttering. After seeing the littlest clamber back into the nest box, I’ve no fears that his/her big sister can and will do so when it suits her. The others are very busy having a preen of their emerging adult feathers while mum or dad (can’t tell which) stands guard on the ledge. There’s no stopping this brood!

    Like

  61. Lynn says:

    Is it the same one out of the nest again? Clearly they are at the exploring stage and we have to let them behave naturally. Thanks for letting us watch.

    Like

  62. vicki says:

    Are we to assume then if they flutter to the ground they will be left. The Sheffield one did it last year and was taken back to safety

    Liked by 2 people

  63. vicki says:

    Pam Birley, I looked at your screen shots, I actually saw the one on 2/5/14 where the little chic some how got stuck to the pigeon carcass as parent flew off, it took my breath away for a second until it dropped back into the nest. When she came back it wasn’t with the others when she nested back down, she turned and saw it and pushed it under her. I will probably never witness something so touching like that again. I’m so glad you captured that moment.

    Like

  64. Jodie says:

    All 4 back in the nest again, not sure when she got back in……………….

    Like

  65. Seems to me that from now on we are going to see more and more of the chicks going walkabout

    Like

    • RonJ says:

      Indeed. At 5:28AM, while Mr. P was still feeding the last of a well-finished pigeon, baby jumped out of the next. Within 5 minutes all 3 of his siblings followed. All 4 are now on an adventure, exploring. It’s new game.

      Like

      • RonJ says:

        Adding to my earlier note, they’re all out of camera range but they must be toying with the webcam because there’s a lot of rattling noises coming through the microphone.

        Like

  66. Mo says:

    Isn’t it wonderful that a parent sits watching during the night? These parent birds could not do more to ensure the safe survival of their children. I remember the year before last when the mother brooded the chicks in the most relentless rain. I never saw anything wetter than that mother falcon, her skin was showing, she looked close to death. And last year the parents sat on the nest in deep snow .. .It’s hard not to think of such devotion in human terms, but how can we help it? Because we all share a common bond, the will to survive.

    Liked by 1 person

  67. Dianne says:

    I could not have said it any better JackD!!!!

    Like

  68. Lotte Brill says:

    Around 5.30am your time, I watched the smallest one jump out of the nest, quickly followed by all the others. Cannot see any of them now.

    Like

  69. vicki says:

    05.41 No chics in nest

    Like

  70. Pat Ratcliffe says:

    All four chicks out of the nest at 5.40 am today and enjoying a lot of wing flappin. Mum and Dad on the ledge watching closely!

    Like

  71. Cas says:

    Two days after the scary experience of one baby being stuck out of the nest for hours (I have to admit I was one of those who saw him when he first got out and then didn’t look again until he was back in) and they’re all out this morning! Amazing the difference two days makes.

    Like

  72. RonJ says:

    Empty nest:

    [img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v252/juanf/ScreenShot05-20-14at0949PM_zps72c7d0b2.png[/img]

    After a while one got back in. I missed that part. Soon a second tried:

    [img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v252/juanf/ScreenShot05-20-14at0959PM001_zps4f2a42e7.png[/img]

    It took a couple of tries but she made it.

    [img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v252/juanf/ScreenShot05-20-14at1000PM001_zps2857de06.png[/img]

    Almost 30 minutes later the other two are still stuck outside. Both parents are watching but doing nothing. So we have two snuggling together in the nest, two snuggling outside. For now.

    Like

  73. 08:15 and the box is empty. Gave me the fright of my life, I can tell you! I’m assuming they’ve all gone walkabout?

    Like

  74. geebee7 says:

    The nest is empty!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Like

  75. geebee7 says:

    Hang on I can just see one little fluffy head.

    Like

  76. Follow the leader this morning ? just after 7:30 ,saw the last one disappear, exploring ?

    Like

  77. J Blunt says:

    8.25am and nobody’s home!

    Like

  78. AlisonM says:

    8.29 am – where have they all gone?

    Like

    • Molly Spriggs says:

      They are in the workings…they did this last year,looks filthy and most nasty too 😦

      Like

  79. silverethers says:

    do they not know how anxious we get ..lol

    Like

  80. The tracking camera has caught up with the fantastic four, phew! They appear to have taken advantage of the fine morning to stretch their legs.

    Like

  81. Lynn says:

    I think they are avoiding the sun!

    Like

  82. andyuk says:

    i fully agree with not interfering. not only are they wild birds but the chick would have only jumped over again and its obviously not practical to keep putting them back in. its probably not easy or very safe to access the ledge anyway.

    i was watching this morning and all the chicks decided to go into the gutter and disappear from view. they sounding like they were having alot of fun attacking the camera tripod or whatever holds the camera up.

    i was surprised at 8.30 am when the camera swivelled round (accompanied by some strange music) and was pointing at the chicks in their new position. there is no escaping big brother haha

    Like

  83. I knew it wouldn’t take them long to all go walkabout….what fun lies ahead!

    Like

  84. Jack D says:

    It’s very hot here in Nottingham and perhaps the chicks are enjoying some shade

    Like

  85. AlisonM says:

    So glad I can see them now – but don’t they realise they are the stars of this show and are not allowed to play hide and seek with the cameras? I reckon they just got fed up of living in their messy nesting box.

    Like

  86. Paul Wainwright says:

    Are we still only able to view one camera?

    Like

  87. billie says:

    I’m not 100% convinced they’re safe in there. it looks like some sort of gas supply box

    Like

  88. Vicki says:

    Its like having four children and constantly worrying. When they discover the wall I wont be able to watch. Lets hope they flutter down safely if they go over

    Like

  89. Some vigorous flapping practice going on just now. Also some enthusiastic postprandial napping 😀

    Like

  90. “What does this bit do?!”

    “I dunno. But that swivelly-thing is looking right at us!”

    http://www.mediafire.com/view/myfiles/#qw5yy7krv8sb1w4

    Like

  91. SueAtt says:

    They all look exhausted after their walkabout earlier this morning. Just one of many adventures to come! lol.

    Some thoughts on names with a link to Nottingham:-

    Mary – (wife of John Boot – original founder of Boots the Chemist, as it was later known)
    Jane (daughter of John & Mary Boot)
    Jesse (son of John & Mary Boot – and probably the most famous of the Boot family) – this could be shortened to Jess so it would be suitable for our smallest chick (Titch)
    Florence (wife of Jesse Boot)

    Liked by 1 person

  92. Suffering with a very nasty, painful, sinus infection so have spent most the day in bed but its good to see when I got up about 10 minutes ago that they are all back in the box, I knew they would make it though cos if the little one can do it I was sure the bigger ones would too…… 🙂

    Like

  93. andyuk says:

    one went up on the concrete edge at 15.54. is it the first time? :/

    went up really easily too

    Like

  94. Margaret says:

    Oh it was a heart stopping moment when the one got on the ledge, thank goodness food arrived and she jumped back in the nest.

    Like

  95. Sid says:

    Oh what worries they are.

    If you haven’t seen there are some Dutch babies here http://www.beleefdelente.nl/vogel/slechtvalk and a link to them being ringed on the right. Just imagine all four of them flapping on their ledge!

    Like

  96. geebee7 says:

    What if a gust of wind blows them off the ledge? Every year I worry but they seem too young this year to go walkabout.

    Like

  97. Lynn says:

    Fed- now all gone on walkabout!

    Like

  98. Jack D says:

    Thanks Andy – great videoing.

    Like

  99. raza says:

    Surely all the flies around the nest and rotting meat is a health hazard aswell as the parents dropping the carcasses onto the pavement down below. If this was any other animal they would be moved.

    Like

    • Mo says:

      Health hazard to what or whom? Do you know where the parents are dropping the carcasses, then? And there won’t be much left of those anyway. Or rotting meat in the nest either – the chicks eat it before it has a chance to rot! Just what are you trying to say, Raza?

      Like

    • andyuk says:

      “Surely all the flies around the nest and rotting meat is a health hazard aswell as the parents dropping the carcasses onto the pavement down below. If this was any other animal they would be moved.”

      i would have thought the sight of the endless stream of cars below, replicated on every street, in every town and city in the world, belching out c02 and carcinogens every hour of the day and night, with not the slightest mention of curtailing their use from any quarter, would be more of a concern than a few bones on a pavement left by an extremely rare bird. but hey, thats the crazy world we live in.

      Like

    • Thistledo says:

      How do you think any wild animal gets on out there, ie jungles, cliff faces, etc? Nobody out there to do the housework. They are wild animals hence no intervention. Man has done enough of that over the centuries.

      Like

    • Lynn Pope says:

      There isn’t a public pavement below, I live in Nottingham and the ledge is quite a distance from the street. If anything is dropped it would drop onto the university grounds. or other building roofs below the nest site. I’m surprised you even commented, it sounds like you don’t like these wonderful birds of pray. Just saying.

      Like

      • raza1970 says:

        I do like BOP but all the talk is about not interfering with nature but they have put a nest box in so the young dont get swept away by rain?????????? Isnt that double standards?

        Like

  100. Jack Dawson says:

    its just past 3 in the morning here and throwing it down with rain, I am only a few miles away from the nest and popped in to look, bless them all huddled in a wigwam trying to keep dry( I can hear the rain on the sound) I just wished I could put my golf brolly over them and the night watchman x

    Like

  101. Just seen your video andyuk…missed all the fun with this damned sinus infection but now got my laptop in the bedroom so I can watch the goings on again….I did wonder just how long it would take before at least 1 of the chicks made it up onto the ledge….though for some reason I half expected it to be the little on first 🙂

    Like

  102. Pam Birley says:

    Thanks for your excellent video AndyUK. I missed that ledge incident which is perhaps just as well for my high blood pressure.

    Like

    • Cockney Nomad says:

      Thanks, Andy – your video has enabled those of us who missed this incident to see it. Thankfully, another happy ending. Pam, hope your BP isn’t running too high with all the worry over the chicks and their adventures. Perhaps some calming craftwork will reduce it to a normal level.

      Liked by 1 person

  103. Jack D says:

    10.36 – Only one in the nest box with an adult on guard – guess the other three are out of camera range

    Like

  104. Cockney Nomad says:

    Yesterday, en route (back home) to London for the day, we got off the bus opposite the Newton Building and saw Mum or Dad jump on to the ledge, obviously from the nest. Quite a thrilling sight! Interestingly, our trip to London was to see the Viking Exhibition at the British Museum where we learned that among the cargo of these explorers/traders in their long boats were falcons. Also my suggestion of a name for little one (whom I do think of as male but could well be proved wrong) is Newton – after the building and the singer/songwriter Newton Faulkner as his name seems to encompass the chicks and their accommodation. I did mention this in an earlier comment which wasn’t put on the blog, probably because the worry of little one being alone outside the nest on Monday overshadowed everything, quite rightly.

    Like

  105. SueAtt says:

    Thanks for the video andyuk – oh my goodness, glad I didn’t see it live! Don’t remember any chicks from previous years venturing out onto the ledge so early on in their development stage, thought it was more when they began vigorous ‘wingercising’. These little rascals are certainly very adventurous.

    Like

  106. Pam Birley says:

    All getting a good feed at around 1.15pm. Two biggest hopped out of box, followed by smallest and finally number 3 joined the others out of sight of the camera. Dad flew off with remains of food and Mum sits serenely on the edge of the ledge. Every year we see different behaviours. I love that little one, what a character 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  107. That pigeon practically walked into the falcon on the ledge and then almost inexplicably nearly flew into the nest where the tiercel was feeding the 4 chicks, mum chased it briefly before returning to the ledge, great stuff!

    Like

  108. Jack Dawson says:

    there were all going for a stroll down the prom/guttering one came back to nest (I think the other 3 are having a crafty ciggie behind a girder)

    Like

  109. Pam Birley says:

    Cameraperson having a busy time focussing on three chick gone walkies and for a paddle along the ledge. Littleun out of sight but finally seen jumping back into the box. Other three peeping around the columns. I just realised I must have gone for my typing lessons in one of those rooms we can see. I believe that building used to be the Nottingham Art College and then became the Technical College. After I left the Manning School I was in hospital for a long time and learned Pitmans shorthand whilst lying on my back for over a year and then, while still convalescing, sat in one of those rooms with the blacked out windows with about 20 other girls learning to type to music on manual typewriters. Oh what memories – better now than then !

    Like

    • Cockney Nomad says:

      Very interesting to hear that you learned to type in one of the rooms near the nest, Pam. Amazing how events from the past can relate to present day sometimes. Also, interested to find you learned Pitman’s shorthand in your youth, as I did. However, you overcame some difficult obstacles to achieve that; I just enrolled on a secretarial college course in West London but always loved shorthand more than typing. Do you still make notes in it? Despite not using it in my job for years, I still find myself taking down phone messages in my slight variation on Isaac Pitman’s wonderful invention and even writing the outlines in my mind as I hear people speak. Old habits……!! Meanwhile, the poor chicks are getting wet and this rain looks like it’s set in for a while. Good to see littleun able to get back into the nest today, even if it did take a few attempts. They are all getting very adventurous now.

      Like

    • Thistledo says:

      Oh Pam, I’ve been there with the typing and shorthand. Sweet memories in NW London. The shorthand still comes into its own on the ‘phone.

      Like

      • Jack D says:

        Me too – I did a secretarial course at Clarendon College here in Nottingham – I remember the veins on my hands bulging as I tried to get to grips with the old manual typewriter – oh the memories!

        Like

  110. geebee7 says:

    It seems to be raining heavily I hope they are OK.

    Like

  111. summer says:

    I can see camera one is searching along the ledge, but the smallest chick is at the bottom of the heap of bigger chicks 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  112. Eileen says:

    I do feel as there is so much space, a small shelter could be provided somewhere. Every other site in the UK has one and abroad.

    Like

  113. geebee7 says:

    Oh the poor babies are soaking wet I hope it doesn’t rain all night. 😦

    Like

  114. andyuk says:

    its 5.30pm, my first visit of the day, and there are 3 soaking chicks (now looking suddenly very grown up), huddling together. i hope the one i cant see is safely in the group, but i cant see it. i shall keep watching

    Like

  115. Julie Kendall says:

    Just tuned in for the first time today – they were white yesterday!!

    Like

  116. Jack Dawson says:

    all four aboard Andy

    Like

  117. billie says:

    What a fantastic mum, still trying to protect them from the rain even at that size

    Liked by 1 person

  118. Pam Birley says:

    Dad is so caring. He follows them around with food, keeps offering even though they are full. He is very wet himself but it now snuggled up into the corner with them shielding them as best he can from the heavy rain.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cockney Nomad says:

      Good to hear that you and I, at least, are keeping shorthand alive. It is a shame that Pitman’s is no longer taught and has been replaced by T-line which, I understand, is not as good and probably doesn’t have an outline for each sound. I can well imagine how fascinated your grandchildren are by this form of writing – my daughter was as a child and would often ask me to write various words in shorthand. Very touching to see the 4 chicks snuggled up together against the rain yesterday with littleun below the 3 girls, then joined by parent later who continued the sheltering. Hope it will be less wet today but the area just outside the nest has puddles in it but at least littleun managed to get back in but it is still a struggle – perhaps a small ladder like my childhood budgie had would help!! My Dad was one of 8 and once his mother when children stopped being a worry. Her reply “Never; the bigger they are, the bigger the worry”. The falcon parents must feel the same.

      Like

  119. andyuk says:

    thanks jack. just watched a feed, and all got fed to full up-ness. mum was going to leave and flew to the ledge, then changed her mind and came back for another go. one chick was given a whole leg and foot and had alot of trouble swallowing it as it came up again three times before it finally stayed down. it was really disgusting lol. mum finally left with the last remnants and returned shortly to attempt to brood them, but i think that boat has sailed 🙂

    Like

  120. barbara deane says:

    Have looked in several times today, but this has to be the sorriest picture – they really do need that umbrella someone offered!!!!!!!! https://www.dropbox.com/s/y8xo5y565db164z/Screenshot%202014-05-22%2018.27.02.png

    Like

  121. silverethers says:

    I have not looked at the blog before even though I have watched for a few years … you are a nice lot … and as soft as me… can we make them a brolly 😉

    Like

  122. silverethers says:

    one bonus about the rain … the ledge and box look cleaner ….:)

    Like

  123. silverethers says:

    what a nice feathery heap .. and it is bed time

    Like

  124. Jack Dawson says:

    nearly 2 in the morning and it hissing it down were I am (a few miles from here) so came to look yes hissing down here too but mam/dad’s in the nest with kids trying to shelter them…

    Like

  125. Jack Dawson says:

    its stopped raining now..i was just thinking of a young robin I found dead in the garden today near the greenhouse (it must have crashed into windows) its buried now in garden but I still feel sad about it but on the flip side ive got blue tits nesting and babes are ready to fly anytime now (that’s if they can take off with all the cooked brown rice I put out for parents to feed them)
    right my friends im off to my nest now… night all x

    Like

    • andyuk says:

      its sad to find a dead animal, but why bury it? its surely better to leave it on the lawn for a magpie, crow or fox to benefit from :). i always do this and they are disappeared in an hour. there are hungry eyes everywhere lol. there was someone complaining about bits of carcasses dropped by the peregrines (probably theoretically) but id bet the local foxes do regular patrols for any tasty left overs.

      Like

  126. Sid says:

    Apparently the parents were offered shelter in the past and either ignored or actively didn’t like it. The great advantage these chicks have it the freedom to exercise which birds in boxes don’t get. It could be worse, the Norwich chicks have neither room nor shelter.

    The Dutch falcons were ringed on Wednesday http://www.beleefdelente.nl/vogel/slechtvalk there’s a link to the right of the video

    Like

  127. Well, looks like little un and 1 of the girls is getting fed while the others are wandering somewhere….the change in them all is quite remarkable…and I do love how little un manages to get himself right under the others to keep warm and dry….

    These birds live in the lap of luxury if you look at others such as the Norwich or Sheffield birds, the latter of which were ringed last Friday…neither has the space to flap and move about yet they manage…and if I remember they did try a roof on the box at NTU and the adults refused to use it….these are wild birds and they choose to nest where they want and we just have to sit and hope it all works out…so far it appears to work 🙂

    PS: fao Grant….hubby not sorted me out yet so i can only post a couple of days a day but its ok, I can cope with that and many thanks to you and Jared for the help 🙂

    Like

    • Cockney Nomad says:

      Hope you’re much better now, Melonie, and are taking effective antibiotics. Yes, I think our falcon chicks have excellent accommodation with the ledge etc which gives them more space and freedom from the nest as they grow. I can imagine a roof over the nest would deter the parents – to them it would probably look like a threat, rather than a cover from the rain. So far, so good this year so fingers crossed….

      Like

      • Thanks Cockney Nomad….I am getting there slowly…..and I agree with your thoughts on the roof over the nest box…I reckon they love the freedom of not being constrained by anything…after all, they also nest on cliffs so clearly enjoy the sense of space around them….

        Like

      • Thistledo says:

        Of all the peregrine sites I view (fahsands of ’em) NTU is by far the best, together with the fact that we have the luxury of two cams, we are indeed lucky.
        Question: Are the cams operated from the NTU building itself, or from elsewhere?

        Like

  128. June says:

    7.48am and just checked in before going to work. Not a chick or parent to be seen….wwwwwwwwwwwaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa where have they gone….hope its just for a wander 🙂

    Like

  129. Cas says:

    Checked in around 5.30am and all four chicks were there (one on the ledge, three in the box). Checked in again now (8am) and there’s not a chick in sight! Parent bird on the ledge, leftovers from the last feed in the box. Looks really strange when they’ve all disappeared.

    Like

  130. Claus says:

    At least three live chicks (?),including the tiny one, seen, looks OK

    Like

  131. Molly Spriggs says:

    A minute ago one of the chicks climbed the ledge and disappeared from sight 😦

    Like

  132. Molly Spriggs says:

    The explorer chick is on the ledge with parent,looks very scary to me 😦

    Like

  133. billie says:

    Who ever said animals/birds don’t have feelings should have seen these parents trying to keep their young dry all night, Same with Sheffield. I saw them last evening and still there at 03.20am. I’m not sure what we will all do when they fledge

    Like

  134. s dickins says:

    Can someone please tell me when the chicks left home last year please? We missed it due to holiday and fear we will miss it again

    Like

    • Claus says:

      The first egg hatched April 23 this year (2013: April 29 ) and they ‘fledge’ after approx 42 day, so end of Week 23, start of Week 24. They will hang around for some months after that, being supplied with food from the parents.

      Like

    • C Render says:

      Just looking at last year’s diary and found a note for 10th June that says that the last falcon chick still on the ledge and has not had the courage to fly off yet. He was on the ledge all night, joined by a returning sibling but had vanished when I looked the next morning.

      Like

  135. vicki says:

    Sheffield blog says they fledge between 5 and 6 weeks, so maybe in next two weeks we will be saying goodbye. love how that little one always finds the warmest driest spot. Its small but got the spirit of Herculese

    Liked by 1 person

  136. Just looked at chichester falcons they still have eggs and tiny babies

    Like

  137. Parrot says:

    I note you advised that you will not intervene and that you only ever visit the nest for ringing.

    Over the course of a few days various rings appear in the nest I assume from feral pigeons, race birds, show birds, and possibly some wild birds.
    These rings then disappear, if you are not visiting the nest where are these rings going??

    Like

  138. andyuk says:

    my guess is that any loose ones would eventually get buried in the gravel with all the shuffling about.

    i dont suppose they would harm the peregrine chicks, if thats what you are worried about, but i think it would be best if ROCK DOVE breeders didnt put them on, just in case, when they release their birds into the WILD.

    Like

    • Parrot says:

      It would be interesting to find out when they clear the nest how many rings they actually retrieve, and what birds they are linked to.

      The majority of food seems to be pigeon, with the odd blackbird, thrush etc as well, are they favouring domesticated/pet birds as they are an easier target, or their are just more of them in a city centre location.

      Like

  139. Sid says:

    The Plym peregrines are having problems with a son who just won’t leave home. Just like some humans. Also, this is a natural nest, they seem quite happy with no roof:
    http://www.plym-peregrines.co.uk/?cat=1

    Like

    • andyuk says:

      thats really interesting sid. thanks for the link. i didnt know they hung around for so long. maybe he will help feed his new brothers and sisters and be an asset in the end but going by the aggressive stealing it doesnt look like it. i dunno, kids these days! he should go and find a nice, cosy university building somewhere.

      Like

  140. Thistledo says:

    Logged on this morning before 05:30 and all was well at HQ. Wasn’t too long before they all had a very good feed with only a small bit of wing left from the pigeon. Even Ickles did well. Such good parents we have here.

    Like

  141. AlisonM says:

    Off to Madeira on Monday – hope they wait to fly until I return. I will of course sign back in to this marvellous on my return to catch up with the news. No one in nest at present – hate it when they all disappear

    Like

  142. geebee7 says:

    Flamin’ rain they are soaked.

    Like

  143. Jack D says:

    It is absolutely teeming down here in Nottingham – I think we must have four very bedraggled chicks.

    Like

  144. Lynn says:

    I can’t believe how quickly they have grown in 9 days.

    Like

  145. geebee7 says:

    Oh the poor babies.

    Like

  146. 15:16 Saturday: one of the girls is favouring her right foot. She was picking at it earlier today, as if she had something stuck between her toes, and is now standing on one leg holding it up in a fist. Can anyone see anything wrong?

    Like

  147. Jack Dawson says:

    one was sleeping on the ledge when it started hailing he soon came back to nest!!

    Like

  148. silverethers says:

    Oh gods two on the ledge now !

    Like

    • AlisonM says:

      I know what you mean. I was watching earlier and one was on the ledge doing her wingacises and simultaneously reversing towards the edge. Luckily she stopped in time, then Dad appeared and sat on the edge keeping an eye on her. But my heart was in my mouth for just a few seconds.

      Like

    • Lynn says:

      Great shots Barbara- thanks

      Like

  149. These birds are getting very adventuresome ,and their feathers have changed in a day ,I’m sure !!

    Like

  150. Jenny Martin says:

    OMG one has gone walkabouts and is right at the end of the ledge

    Like

    • sue says:

      I think they are all asleep at the moment thank goodness. My heart is in my mouth every time they venture on the ledge.

      Like

  151. barbara deane says:

    Can I make an admission??!!

    Since the day I finally learnt how to do this dropbox thingy, I have taken 551 screenshots!!!!! Aren’t you lucky that I have not posted them all!

    Can anyone beat that???????

    Here’s one more for luck! https://www.dropbox.com/s/oz3jgk2t64ij4ti/Screenshot%202014-05-24%2014.51.46.png

    Like

  152. sue says:

    Oh no one of them has decided to wander again….please come back little one

    Like

  153. sue says:

    Sorry, I know I am like a Mother Hen, but I just cant help it.

    Like

  154. sue says:

    All settled now for the night – hopefully – phew thank goodness

    Like

  155. geebee7 says:

    Well there is one on the ledge, one in the nest and who knows where the other two are :(. Everywhere is soaking wet and there is a big pool of water next to the box (as usual).

    Like

  156. vicki says:

    Even the little one can get on the ledge now

    Like

  157. 4 chicks enjoying a bit of sunshine………..when not going walkabout along the ledge and up and down the guttering…like kiddies having fun out of mum and dad’s way 🙂

    Like

  158. barbara deane says:

    While the cat’s away the mice do play comes to mind!

    1 just returned from its latest adventure to join 2 others in the nest but…………where is no4?????/

    Like

  159. Pam Birley says:

    Anyone seen a feed today?

    Like

  160. Lynn says:

    16.25- no-one at home!

    Like

  161. barbara deane says:

    PHEW!!! was just about to post about no4 and a missing one?! Then suddenly no4 divided into 2!!!

    Cannot remember seeing the parents this afternoon? Poor babes must be so hungry!

    Like

  162. Jack D says:

    Just thinking watching them looking at the city skyline and traffic what a different view they are having to country Peregrine chicks who would look out from their cliff top nest across wild moorland or perhaps a blue ocean possibly dotted with little rocky islands. These truly are urban birds – city born and bred and completely at home with the urban jungle!

    Like

  163. Sally Aycrigg-Tate says:

    Just saw the funniest thing! The little one and two others were picking at remnants left on the ledge. Suddenly dad arrived on the ledge with some food. The little one grabbed it and ran as fast as he could into the nest!! Dad had to go and get some more!

    Liked by 1 person

  164. Goodness me, I saw the little one out the box but it really is all par for the course. Why one earth people start watching these cams if they cannot stand the possible heartache is beyond me. Yes they are in the city and yes there is a window that opens out onto the ledge but its bad enough that the nest is “tampered” with to ring the chicks, without viewers expecting the NTU guys to intervene at every moment something like this happens. It truly can be hearbreaking viewing (those who watched 2 years ago will know what i mean) but on the other hand we are so privileged to be able to see these fabulous birds in such an intimate way. Human emotion gets in the way a little too much I guess BUT it really is nature at its finest- and cruellest and it is happening out there in all the unmonitered nests around the country.

    Like

    • Well said Julie……I only started watching last year as thats when I found this website…but its had me fascinated ever since….and as you say, this nature at its finest and cruellest…face it or don’t watch..

      Like

  165. andyuk says:

    looking forward to the name choices. but are they certain of the sexes of them. one of the 3 is looking more like the 4th chick in size than the biggest two. but its probably my imagination. :/

    another thing. the legs and feet of all of them look much thinner/smaller than the mums- she has massive powerful legs. 🙂 but the rings on the chicks look quite tight fitting already. assuming the female chicks legs will grow to match mums, do the rings expand to allow for growth. im sure the experts know what they are doing, but these things really worry me lol

    Like

  166. Jack D says:

    Dad arrives with food but only one in the box – can hear the others but where are they – dad is clearly puzzled

    Like

  167. Jack D says:

    Second bird arrives in the box – can’t believe how quickly they are getting their juvenile plumage

    Like

  168. geebee7 says:

    One of the babies is lying down with it’s head leaning on the wooden rim of the box looking towards the camera….oh bless.

    Like

  169. DaveDHL says:

    had a look in 2 or 3 times today and only one chick visible each visit I hope the others are OK

    Like

  170. barbara deane says:

    2 chicks in the nest when I looked in a few minutes ago, with parent along the ledge.

    I have to say that their standard of housekeeping leaves a lot to be desired!!!!!!! LOL

    Like

  171. 3.25 food time everyone appears ravenous

    Like

  172. Jack D says:

    Just in time to see both adults in the box with a prey item each feeding all four young – quite a box full!

    Like

  173. barbara deane says:

    Not a lot of room in the nest when there are 2 parents, 4 babes. AND 2 prey!!!

    Like

    • Jack D says:

      Thanks Barbara – I got a screen shot but didn’t know how to post it. That was lovely to see wasn’t it.

      Like

  174. Nick says:

    15:30 – A nest full of falcons……..

    ….both parents on feeding duty …………

    Like

  175. Jack Dawson says:

    lol they remind me of little old men/ladies hobbling about with their little hunch backs…..there looking hungry I think it must soon be tea time!

    Like

  176. John Jones says:

    Just had a quick look at the webcam and it looks like there is 2 males and 2 females, although one female has disappeared out of shot haha

    Like

  177. Indeed, they’re rapidly losing their baby fluff and gaining their juvenile plumage. From the way this lovely young lady was grooming her leg (see picture), I bet it itches like crazy!

    We also watched them for some time this afternoon; everyone was out for a toddle up and down the ledge, before they decided it was too wet and snuggled up under the eaves.

    Like

  178. andyuk says:

    one was sitting upright on the edge of the concrete bit just now, and tried to do that ‘i’m cool, standing on one leg’ thing the adults do. but it lost its balance and nearly fell over!

    thankfully it was on the edge facing in to the box, not the scary side.

    dont try to be cool just yet, kids. theres plenty of time for that !!

    Like

  179. Jack Dawson says:

    nearly 2 in the morning..i thought I saw a bat! fly into the camera but 2 of the chicks were preening so it must have been a dark feather

    Like

  180. Just wondering is anyone on chick watch when university is closed? Are we supposed to ring anyone if we see chick go over edge? Sorry that i worry so much can’t help myself.

    Like

  181. David says:

    Just catching up on this family all good is it not possible to remove comments at least every 24 hours surely no need for this many.REGARDS

    Like

  182. vicki says:

    One chick alone in the nest feeding herself with a large chunk of pigeon, wonder where she got it from

    Like

    • Thistledo says:

      That pigeon could only have been left there by a parent, unless of course one of the Team catapulted it in, lol. We now enter into the next stage of the chicks’ upbringing; Feeding themselves and so far they’re doing a fine job, although Ickle being younger, hasn’t yet properly mastered it.

      Like

  183. geebee7 says:

    There is certainly a lot of rings from racing pigeons in the nest.

    Like

  184. Thistledo says:

    Maureenblackburn, I have already asked the question on here whether the cams are operated from the uni or elsewhere but regret I haven’t had a response. If a chick goes over the edge, I read that it can be reintroduced to the scrape. If it’s not too badly harmed, it can be cared for by a sanctuary somewhere until it can be reintroduced.
    PS: There’s nothing to worry about until there’s something to worry about. Rest easy.

    Like

  185. Dianne says:

    I have been flicking into the live stream intermittently this morning but have only seen 2 chicks. Are they all OK? I can’t believe how much the plumage has changed over the weekend.

    Like

  186. Nick says:

    A shot of a slightly ungainly chick testing her wings right at the very end of the runway….

    Won’t be long now……..

    Like

  187. Thistledo says:

    OK, Cam tweakers, what’s of so much interest at the end of that runway, eh? Something you need to tell us about, please? What exactly are those lumps towards the end of the runway? Look like dead mice, or something.

    Like

  188. Graham E Smith says:

    Any chance of adding to the camera array when this breeding season is over……at this stage of their development the youngsters are out of view for most of the time.???……..I am pretty sure that an appeal for donations to cover the costs would bring in more than enough .

    Like

  189. vicki says:

    Is there a pigeon left flying in Notts today, I’ve seen the parents bring in several in the last couple of hours. They all look so grown up now, in a week or so I think we will see some flight

    Like

    • andyuk says:

      i don’t think they would even dent the population. town pigeons can nest all year, (up to 8 times per year) and have 2 chicks each time. they can also breed as early as 7 months old.

      nottingham, like most big cities could probably easily support a few breeding pairs just on feral pigeons. even if they went short, theres many thousands of wood pigeons, gulls and crows in the surrounding countryside to exploit.

      Like

      • Pete, Manchester says:

        Having observed the feeding habits of these Falcons, over the last 14 days, I have yet to see a feral pigeon being consumed, the proliferation of life rings in the nest back this up, In short the chief diet appears to be the Racing Pigeon.

        Like

  190. barbara deane says:

    Well here is one of them! The camera was blowing all over the place in the wind, but hopefully this is ok?! https://www.dropbox.com/s/kirshbfx6fbsr6q/Screenshot%202014-05-27%2016.05.46.png

    ……..And here is another, but where oh where are the missing ones? https://www.dropbox.com/s/vb3ge786b3n50d2/Screenshot%202014-05-27%2016.07.54.png

    Like

  191. Sheena says:

    I think we are a baby missing 😦 I’m off on holiday for 2 weeks now and can’t check again but I really hope I’m wrong

    Like

  192. vicki says:

    Andyuk that wasn’t meant as a serious comment regarding pigeons, just that they parents had brought several in, in a short time. Looks like flight is on the cards they look as if they’re wanting to have a go but not sure. Three on the ledge all egging each other on and strutting about.

    Like

  193. geebee7 says:

    That collection of water in front of the nest box must be putrid with all the flesh floating in it.

    Like

  194. andyuk says:

    “Having observed the feeding habits of these Falcons, over the last 14 days, I have yet to see a feral pigeon being consumed, the proliferation of life rings in the nest back this up, In short the chief diet appears to be the Racing Pigeon. ”

    so what, cant blame the falcons for it. if breeders dont like the way reality works, they should either give up the hobby (and find something else to do that doesnt conflict with reality), breed their birds specifically to avoid predation better (by breeding from known survivors of peregrine attacks) or accept the losses in good spirit (even seeing it as an honour for their bird to be taken). at the end of the day, racing pigeons are just rock doves – a common bird. they breed relatively quickly with 8 generations per year and 2 chicks each time. not only that, but they breed at 7 months old. so its not as though they are rare or cant be replaced reasonably quickly and cheaply. also there is other problems with moaning about racing pigeons being killed. if there are many owners around, then the actual losses per owner is going to be small due to how few peregrines there are. but if there are only a tiny number of owners losing many birds, then the loss to a mere handful of people has to be weighed against, not only the intrinsic value of nature, but the far greater benefits to the whole community of having a functioning ecosystem and right of all of us to enjoy nature.

    however, ive definitely seen a few without rings, and also many starlings, various unidentified small birds and a gull. due to the numbers of wild pigeons, gulls and crows about, if racing pigeons didnt exist, its likely the falcons would still do very well in the area.

    Like

    • Pete, Manchester says:

      I take it you would be happy to see the re-introduction of the Wolf, into our towns & cities then ?

      Like

    • Mike says:

      Why should we give up our hobby and we don’t need your help just relax the laws and we will sort the problem out ourselves.
      The way you talk you should breed off peregrines that avoid a shot gun and those that don’t can die with honour. What an idiot!!!
      We don’t want to see extinction either just control of bop numbers.

      Like

    • Fran says:

      andyuk you really do need to get your facts right. I think it would be safe to say that at the very least 80% of pigeon fanciers have suffered losses to birds of prey, mainly Peregrines and Sparrowhawks. What you have to realise is that when a hawk strikes it scatters the flock, it may only kill one bird but the remainder of the flock go into panic mode and end up hitting, trees, buildings, vehicles etc, resulting in multiple losses from one strike. I personally have experienced hawk attacks on a flock of young birds exercising round their loft and they have scattered to all points of the compass, with many never being seen again. To say they can be replaced reasonably quickly and cheaply is a stupid comment. Have you any idea how much it can cost to buy a good breeding pigeon and how long it takes to build a family of good racers, it is not an overnight job and can take several years. Have you any idea how much time, money and effort goes in to keeping racing pigeons, it is a 365 days a year labour of love. Cleaning out the lofts, feeding, exercising, breeding and rearing young birds are all part and parcel of a pigeon fanciers life. They are also a lifeline for many fanciers who have suffered ill health and bereavement, they are a reason to get up and get out on a daily basis. The majority of fanciers would never consider breeding off a 7 month old bird, nor would they consider 8 rounds of eggs in a year. If a peregrine just took one bird most fanciers, although they would not be happy about it, would accept it, it is what happens to the rest of the flock that is soul destroying. The only good thing about a peregrine is that it kills quickly unlike the sparrowhawk which attacks a pigeon and eats it alive. To witness this is absolutely heartbreaking, the sparrrowhawk on the pigeon’s back eating it until it finally dies. I have watched the Notts falcons for the last couple of years and even though I am a pigeon fancier I have to admire the dedication of the parent birds but at the same time I am sickened when I see all the rings in the nest. Racing pigeons are much easier prey than feral or “street” pigeons, they fly higher for one which enables the peregrine to dive and catch them, feral pigeons keep close to the buildings and do not get up to any great height. I agree that it should be the right of all to enjoy nature, but it should also be our right to want to protect our birds to the best of our ability.

      Like

  195. Mike says:

    I would like to know what happens to all the rings off the racing pigeons that are ripped to bits by these nuisance bop. When the chicks were rung there were pigeon rings in the nest but none have been reported to the Royal Pigeon Racing Society. Why Not???
    I’m sure the owner could be informed of his/her birds fate.
    If these bop were taking domestic cats or dogs there would be an outcry.
    it’s about time the law was changed to limit their numbers and protect all birds that have a right to live.

    Like

    • bobbity says:

      Indeed.
      I’d vote for the outlawing of anyone keeping a domestic cat.

      Racing pigeon owner are we, Mike, by any chance?

      Like

      • Kathleen colton says:

        If Mike is a racing pigeon owner then he has the right to want his birds protected and not see them as a pile of bones and rings in a peregrine scrape.

        Like

      • Mike says:

        With comments like yours bobbity It just shows your total ignorance, remember these birds helped you and your family remain British during the war, the most decorated animal to ever exist.
        Pigeon fliers spend thousand of pounds every year looking after their birds and feel they have a right to protect them.
        No one wants to see any species extinct but at the moment bop numbers in this country are getting out of control and MANY species of birds are being adversely affected.
        Like I said if they were taking family pets there would be uproar.
        Let’s see the reintroduction of the eagle owl into this country.

        Like

    • Tim Dev says:

      Mike, at the end of the season, when the nest is cleaned, all rings are taken out and reported to the proper authorities.

      Like

  196. Jack D says:

    15.25 – the biggest chick has just stood right on the edge wing flapping – my heart was in my mouth

    Like

  197. Jack D says:

    Pete, Manchester – given the number of prey items brought in from what I can see in the nest Racing Pigeons account for a very small percentage of their diet – there appear to be only two or three coloured leg rings currently on view

    Like

    • Graham E Smith says:

      I just spent a half hour watching Dad feed his family….another lovely fat pigeon…..I now know now what pecking order means……youngest (and loudest.) first,followed in age order by the others…….the nest box now resembles a butchers block….blood and bits all over the place.
      It was interesting to see the youngest (who had been huddled shivering and shouting)…once the crop was full ;jump up on to the top of the box edge and start vigorously exercising it’s wings as it’s siblings had previously been doing.
      Give the after another 6 to 8 days and they will all be learning how to do their own foraging.

      Like

    • Mike says:

      Jack please keep watching on a daily basis, they keep removing the rings and don’t have the decency to report the rings to the RPRA as they are meant to.

      Like

      • grantntu says:

        We’re sorry you feel this way Mike. I can assure you that we we do not collect the rings regularly. At the end of each season NTU and the Wildlife Trust collect all the rings and log them with the RPRA. The one exception to this is when we ring the chicks. If we see any easily accessible rings we collect and log those at this time too.

        Like

  198. Eileen says:

    I was watching the little one intently about 4.30 today. It was a close up. I am sure I saw a RING on his leg. Can this please be confirmed for me xxxx

    Also it would be wonderful not to have to scroll so much… a new blog every week???

    Like

    • Graham E Smith says:

      Dear Eileen,on the right of your screen is a narrow rectangle (Mine is light grey.)It has small arrows top and bottom…..somewhere in this rectangle you will find a little box containing 3 horizontal lines.If you position your cursor /pointer on this box;left click and hold down you will fin that you can move from top to bottom of the page & up and down very fast.
      Eureka….no need for a separate blog.
      Regards.

      Like

    • Hetty says:

      The young ones have all been ringed.

      Like

  199. Eddie says:

    I know its natures way but looking at the number of pigeon rings in the nest I can understand why pigeon fanciers get annoyed and Im sure comments by the likes of Andy (if you dont like it pack it in) wont go down very well with lots of people on this forum can we have some compassion for the breeders of these unfortunate birds please

    Like

    • geebee7 says:

      I agree with this statement. I know our falcons cannot differentiate between ringed pigeons and non ringed and don’t catch them on purpose but I do feel sorry for these pigeon fanciers. They have names for their pigeons and love them so do feel sorry for them Andy.

      Like

      • Jack D says:

        I agree too – but the statement that there are too many birds of prey is wrong. It is often quoted by people who want them controlled i.e. killed. Bird of prey numbers are only now recovering from the disasterous consequences of the overuse of chemicals particularly DDT which affected the birds productivity for many years and caused their numbers to plummet.

        Like

  200. barbara deane says:

    Hi Eileen – I think that I am right in saying that the little one was ringed at the same time as his/her siblings a few days ago. 3 females, but no4 was too young for them to be able to tell the sex.

    Ditto about the length of the blog! Earlier this season I did ask about having the latest posts at the top, but never got a reply?!

    It is such a pity that this blog has to turn into an argument/disagreement about what happens in nature! The same happened last year and probably the year before too!

    IF YOU DO NOT LIKE IT, DON’T WATCH IT!

    Like

  201. barbara deane says:

    Just copied this from the front page……….

    Warning: These webcams contain live unedited footage of a family of peregrine falcons. Please understand that at times this may include disturbing images.

    Like

  202. Carole says:

    Did I just see one of the young FLY into the box???

    Like

  203. Eileen says:

    Can we PLEASE have the names you have chosen BEFORE they fly away

    Like

    • Thistledo says:

      I second that Eileen.

      Like

    • I hope that you realise that these birds are wild, not tame pet creatures ;they are not in your home,just because you can bring up their images on your screen.
      We humans like to humanise our pets by naming them,but the naming of them is typical of the wooly minded culture that we promote in the western world….typified by ; unfortunately, many in our society.
      Might I respectfully suggest,to identify them….NTU 1,2,3 and 4 would be quite enough.

      Like

      • Thistledo says:

        And how will you name next year’s brood, Graham? 5, 6, 7, & 8? This wonderful way of `sharing’ the lives of falcons does bring them into our homes and what on earth’s wrong with giving them names for identity purposes. They already have numbers on the rings.

        Like

      • geebee7 says:

        I am one of the wooly minded people you are talking about.

        I love animals (all animals) and have done so since I was very young I am now 60. I see no harm in giving them names it just shows how much we care for them.

        I rescued a snail this morning from the pavement as I knew someone would tread on it, I found some grass and put it on it (no I didn’t name it).
        We all know that these baby birds are wild as are their parents but what harm is there in caring for them, naming them and worrying about their welfare?
        I wish there were more people in the world that cared for the welfare of animals whether they be wild, farm or domesticated.
        Oh and by the way I am a veggie.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Cas says:

        I fail to see a problem with naming them. I’m not expecting to call them and for them to answer and come to me, nor I imagine is anyone else who likes to name them. I know they’re wild animals. So, Graham, please feel free to call them NTU 1, 2, 3 and 4 if that suits you. I’ll continue to use names.

        Like

    • geebee7 says:

      I would like to see the he/she called HORUS.

      Like

  204. Eileen says:

    I lived in East London for years…. the pigeons there were a big problem…(not racing) we could have done with a few falcons there but I suppose there would have been uproar from religious fanatics then. A feral pigeon to me is just rat with with wings. All entitled as we are to live under the laws of nature.

    Like

    • PLEASE ; explain what religion has got to do with feral/racing pigeons and falcons.?

      Like

      • Thistledo says:

        I think, Graham, that Eileen didn’t necessarily mean something of a spiritual nature. People can `religously’ keep racing pigeons, etc.

        Like

      • Eileen says:

        Hi Graham, dont some peoples believe that when we die our soul goes into another living thing. That what I was referring to. People might see a pigeon and say O look there is grandad

        Like

    • b johnson says:

      Debate on TV news other day about feral pigeons and both guys agreed that pigeons had only taken advantage of the attitude of the human rats who litter our streets with leftover takeaways etc so perhaps its time we looked at our own society instead of persecuting an innocent bird, also it was also stated the chances of catching anything of these pigeons was negligible

      Like

  205. Pam Birley says:

    I do believe I saw one chick feeding another from scraps on the ledge. They all look a bit bedraggled and rather sleepy this morning. They and we too need some sunshine. But the progress of the chicks has been wonderful to watch and the cam coverage by NTU continues to be superb.

    Like

  206. geebee7 says:

    It’s pouring with rain and they are soaking wet, poor little souls.

    Like

  207. Jack Dawson says:

    names of the elements would be good Rain,Thunder,Lightning,Sunny,Breeze,Snowwy, etc……

    Like

  208. Thistledo says:

    Thanks Jared, for such a good lead-up to the `christenings’. Your last para made me quite weepy.
    I think because they are such impersonal names, that Snap, Crackle and Pop will be ideal. (Well done Molly for the suggestion). I shall remember those names with ease.
    Good luck to Frank in his retirement and thanks for being there when it really mattered.

    Like

    • Molly Spriggs says:

      Thanks Thistledo ,I thought for the one who goes walk about this would suit…….Dora the explorer 🙂

      Like

  209. geebee7 says:

    I just wish it would stop raining for them. If it did all the goo in the nest and around would dry up.

    Like

  210. Eileen says:

    I hate naming animals after humans its awful

    Like

  211. geebee7 says:

    I just love it when they run.

    Like

  212. vicki says:

    I’ve just seen a flight all the way down the ledge, looks like they will be of this weekend

    Like

  213. geebee7 says:

    They are sitting on the ledge looking down. I know they have to go but it scares me to think how vulnerable they will be alone. When I think of poor Storm with just one leg it makes me want to cry.

    Like

    • Molly Spriggs says:

      I reckon we should all thank the University for allowing us all to share these creatures ,I/we have enjoyed the weeks of their progress ,thank you Uni

      Like

  214. vicki says:

    Did anyone see three of the chicks sitting on a wall just now and a wood pigeon land at the end. The pigeon was making its way towards them, and another pigeon joined it before they flew off. The falcons didn’t take a bit of notice of the pigeons. Come on ladies where are your hunting instincts. I did think the parents may have seen it, but seems they were off somewhere

    Like

    • Lotte Brill says:

      I saw that too and the three chicks were not the slightest bit interested!
      I want to say thank you so much for those who man the cameras and allow us all over the world to see these beautiful birds. An ex Brit, living in Aust., thanks!

      Like

  215. Thistledo says:

    Morning Vicki. Missed that bit but surely they catch their grub on the wing? The pigeons won’t stick around for the chicks to run up and have a gobble. A positive graveyard at the end of that part of the runway.

    Like

  216. Molly Spriggs says:

    I hope what I have just seen on the ledge isn’t correct ??? it looked to me that two chicks were eating another chick,it appeared to be breathing headless …..please someone tell me I was seeing it wrong …it was a dreadful sight:(

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi Molly,

      What you saw was a pigeon being eaten while another falcon had a lie down behind the pigeon’s head, with its own head tucked into it’s chest. Easy to see why you were worried though. 🙂

      Chris

      Like

    • steve says:

      If it was eating it’s sibling it’s only nature.

      Like

  217. Thistledo says:

    Oh no! Is there something wrong with that chick laying by the kill on the runway? Don’t like the look of this; it’s been there ages.

    Like

  218. Thistledo says:

    Cancel my last post. The little tinker stood up whilst I was prepping above.

    Like

  219. vicki says:

    I understand that Thistledo, but they didn’t even show an interest in the pigeon, infact the pigeon was about to make its way to the chicks to have a look at them when the other pigeon arrived and they flew off

    Like

    • Sally says:

      Have seen pigeons sitting very close to the adult peregrines too, so I don’t think it’s a case of the youngsters not having hunting instinct. The way they catch their prey is a 200 mph dive so I don’t think they’d contemplate trying to grab one sitting beside them, especially given the comical way the peregrines hobble along the ledge

      Like

  220. Molly Spriggs says:

    Oh many thanks folk,really put my mind at rest,must concentrate better me thinks,will be sad when they go though !!!!

    Like

  221. Molly Spriggs says:

    Today I have only seen three chicks ??? where is the fourth does anyone know please,something else for me to fret about 😦

    Like

  222. Ryewolf says:

    I’ve seen all 4 today at 14:31pm, they were under the camera housing

    Like

  223. vicki says:

    All there now fighting over a bit of pigeon mum brought, mum landed and one stole it and ran away. Three hungry falcons screaming at her. they are all now trying to steal the remains from the large falcon

    Like

  224. geebee7 says:

    It’s going to be awful for Frank when his/her sisters go he will be all alone. 😦

    Like

    • Sally says:

      I doubt he’ll be far behind them! Anyway, they won’t fly off never to return. They hang around with the parent birds for quite a while after fledging while the parents teach them to hunt (I guess)

      Like

  225. vicki says:

    looks like the ladies have gone

    Like

  226. Molly Spriggs says:

    There appears to be a chick on a ledge below the main ledge ??? I have only seen one this morning anyway….

    Like

  227. geebee7 says:

    Is that little Frank calling for food? 😦

    Like

  228. Thistledo says:

    No doubt about it, the volunteer cam operators have done a grand job in showing us the very best of the family BUT . . . I do think it would have been good if, during what has been a probable most important weekend, that some arrangement could have been made to ensure us followers witnessed actual chick take-off into their new world. Too late now, if the take-off has already happened but it maybe worth considering for future years.

    Like

  229. I can only see three chicks today

    Like

  230. Jackson Ward says:

    Lynn Pope this site is for everyone, I didn’t say I didn’t like them, you said they had nested in a gutter but were then moved, the heading of this topic is we cannot intervene but you already have by placing a false nesting box for them when they had chosen to nest in the gutter! No need to be nasty, everyone is entitled to their opinion, just because yours was challenged.

    Like

    • Jackson Ward says:

      Let’s be realistic, making false nesting sites and giving them pet names isn’t encouraging them to face the forces of nature is it, you are intervening!

      Like

  231. Graham E Smith says:

    Jackson………did the birds choose to nest in the box or the gutter ? No one forced them into the box….they had dozens of metres of gutter to chose from…..THEY chose. Just as they chose to nest in the city rather than the mountains…………perhaps we should have knocked down the Newton building to make sure for you that they did not allow us to intervene by providing an artificial cliff face ?…….As for naming them….I have a shrewd suspicion that they do not know anything about the names…..As for intervening in anything………in the long term…….totally irrelevant.

    Like

    • steve says:

      Graham the peregrines 1st chose to nest on Goldsmith Street sides of the Uni i remember it well lots of twitters with cameras etc etc also i could see what was happening.from my office. The peregrines laid eggs some of them eggs rolled in the gutter therefore no chicks. Then the Notts Wildlife trust decided to place a man made box where it is now to encourage them to stay and they have been there ever since. Whats natural about the box may i ask you? Take away the box an lets see nature take it;s course if they lay and rear chicks all well and good if not that’s nature. Notts Wildlife was asked to remove the man made box from the Hallows Church in Gedling they removed the box on request no eggs have been laid since and no rearing of any chicks yet the male and female peregrine still take up residence on the church what does that tell you? When the box was in place x amount of eggs was laid and chicks reared nothing natural and us humans again interfering with nature… I await your reply

      Like

  232. Thistledo says:

    Well said Graham. My sentiments exactly. Jackson, you are obviously disturbed by this whole concept and perhaps you should follow some other interest.

    Like

  233. Eddie says:

    Putting these nest boxes in city centers encourages peregrines to nest in places where they would not normally do so
    They are cliff nesting birds ie quarries or coastal locations and would not normally nest in towns or cities
    These nest sites are by definition artificial and as such are an intervention and therefor not natural
    As for giving them human names and characteristics its a nonsense they are wild birds not pets
    And while I,m sure most would feel sympathy for the unfortunate victims of these predators what worries me is that a minority on this forum seem to delight in the sight of the prey birds being torn to pieces and perhaps it is they who should follow some other interests

    Like

    • Thistledo says:

      Eddie, the delight, surely, is that the chicks have another meal. The killing of prey, from any animal in the wild, is always somewhat distressing but you know what? That’s nature! At least, unlike some other hawks, the falcons kill the prey outright.
      Of course, newcomers to the world of falcon-following will find it distressing but all are warned that we may see images that we may find disturbing. I think you may be talking of a small minority of bloggers.

      Like

    • geebee7 says:

      I do not find any pleasure in watching birds being ‘torn to pieces’ far from it. It doesn’t matter where these falcons choose to live they will still eat other birds.

      A couple of weeks ago I stopped a sparrow hawk from attacking a pigeon which had gone to the ground and was hiding under a car. The hawk was trying to get under the car to get to the pigeon and I shooed it away letting the pigeon fly away after it had rested for a little while.

      Regarding human names, this helps when we want to identify the chicks and follow them on the journey through life. We heard the other more about poor Storm (the only surviving chick) that had been found dead with one of his legs missing. Poor Storm I hope he is in Rainbow Bridge.

      People shouldn’t say mean things about the pigeons, as a animal mad person (and a veggie) I respect all animal life and it breaks my heart when they are ill or killed. I would have been just as upset if our chicks had died of starvation through lack of food.

      Many humans are terribly cruel to animals and deserve to go to prison for their crimes, animals eat other animals to live (not counting domestic animals here).

      Like

  234. vicki says:

    geebee that is so true, although they have to eat to survive we know this, lets hope its a swift end for the pigeon. And Graham yes you’re right some of us may not like the names, but I doubt the falcons will either know or care. They will all hopefully lead long happy healthy lives

    Like

  235. Molly Spriggs says:

    I for one will miss these little creatures who will go from my life having given so much pleasure to us all…..go go chicks and fly away to where you belong xxxx

    Like

  236. I would just like to say a big thank you to all the staff at NTU who made all this possible, and for all your hard work. Also happy retirement (when it comes) to Frank .

    Like

  237. Pamela Doncaster says:

    I would just like to say a very big thank you to all the staff at NTU that makes this possible. Also happy retirement to Frank .

    Like

  238. Molly Spriggs says:

    Yes I too wish to thank all the staff at NTU ….we will be looking forward to next years brood,and as my Dad was also a Frank I wish him well too…
    .FRANK AND HIS TANK
    Written and performed
    by
    Jack Warner

    I told you last week about Claude and his sword,
    How with generals he would try and swank;
    But to-night I must talk of a great friend of mine,
    So I’ll speak about Frank and his tank.

    When he first joined, the sergeant said,
    “What can you do?” And Frank said, “Well, all kinds of things.
    I can ride a girls bike, and I play draughts a bit,
    And I’ve also an auntie who sings.’,

    Then the sergeant says, “Well, now we’re all satisfied,
    Although I ain’t found out a thing;
    I ask you a query, and you tell me nothing
    Except that your auntie can sing.”

    In a very few words said the sergeant,
    “You’re here to help win the war driving tanks.
    Would you like to drive one?” Frank said, “Well, I don’t mind.
    Says the sergeant, “That’s settled!” Frank said “Thanks!”

    Then they walked out together, tho’ not arm in arm,
    To where one of these monsters was stood.
    Says the sergeant, “D’you think you could cope with this ‘ere?”
    Frank said, “If you did-well, I could.”

    “After you,”. said the sergeant, so Frank hops in first
    In his overalls well-pressed and dapper;
    But before the sergeant had got properly settled…
    Frank lets down the lid on his napper.

    Then to Frank’s great surprise the tank started to move,
    And his hands got all sticky like toffee.
    At that moment they got to the officers’ mess,
    Where the colonel was just taking coffee.

    Well, a tank running wild doesn’t think of those things,
    And as Frank started thinking of mother,
    The tank pushed its way through the side of the mess
    And pushed its way out through the other.

    Then Frank said, “Blue pencil, blue pencil, blue pencil!”
    And his hands were much stickier than toffee.
    Besides the unconscious sergeant and the tank running wild,
    He had the colonel on top with his coffee!

    Well, they went down a ditch and the colonel got off
    ‘Cause he’d finished his coffee by now;
    Then the sergeant come to, and said, “We going somewhere?”
    Frank says, “Yes, I think so, and how.”

    Then the sergeant shouts out, “There’s a pond over there
    On the far side of that grassy bank.”
    So they both hops out quick and let the tank go,
    And when it got to the pond Frank’s tank sank.

    Frank said, “Well, I’m sorry, but what could I do?
    I know I said I could do lots of things.”
    Said the sergeant, “There”s one thing you’d better do quick,
    That’s go back to your auntie what sings!”.xxxx

    Like

  239. Thistledo says:

    My thanks are extended to all those involved in bringing these wonderful birds into our homes. First class job and well done. My third year of pure pleasure.
    Not wanting to wish my life away but I say now,
    `Roll on next year!’

    Like

  240. Thistledo says:

    Parent and chick sharing a kill at 07:15. Missed their arrival on the runway so don’t know which one actually make the kill. Chick started feeding then parent took over.

    Like

  241. geebee7 says:

    Saw three of them on the ledge one was a parent but the others could have been chicks .

    Like

    • Graham E. Smith says:

      Saw one sitting on the ledge close to the nesting box last night,it was still there when I returned some 20 minutes later….by this time it was late evening….possibly roosting for the night on home ground.

      Like

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