How webcams can reveal hidden family values in wildlife

The return of Storm?

The return of Storm?

As we’ve watched the chicks hatch, and the parent birds devotedly feed and tend to them, we’ve been reminded of the wonderful family bond that quickly establishes between parent and young of many wild species. Whilst some species have a more laissez-faire approach to parenting, for others, such as the beloved peregrines on top of the Newton building, the investment in care and attention has become part of their success.

By investing time and energy in rearing their young these adult peregrines will have the best chance of securing future successes for their line – ensuring that their genes pass on to future generations. Whilst we have long been aware of the devotion of parent birds of many species, the advent of webcams has begun to shed light on another aspect of family dedication that was previously hidden from view.

Some of our webcam viewers may have noticed a third adult bird on the ledge recently (as pictured, on 27 April). As far as we can tell, this is likely to be Storm, last year’s surviving chick, or possibly even a chick from an earlier brood, which has yet to establish a territory of its own and may be hoping to lend his parents a helping hand with the new brood.

Over the past couple of years, similar scenes have been noted on webcams across the country and it would seem that, as well as peregrines, this behavior has now been observed amongst water birds such as moorhens. Whilst more research is needed into the precise reasoning for this, it would appear that the young chick is simply helping to ensure the future of its family line. I suppose it will also benefit from the experience – giving it a better chance of success when rearing chicks of its own in the future.

This is just another example of the scientific benefit of webcams. Not only do they allow us to enjoy watching birds in the wild, they can actually help us learn about them too.

Erin McDaid
Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

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122 Responses to How webcams can reveal hidden family values in wildlife

  1. SW says:

    It’s a great picture!

    Like

  2. Pam Birley says:

    Wow, very interesting blog Erin. It would be great to see Storm again. I know he was ringed so (if he still has the ring) maybe you could ascertain whether it was him. Wonderful capture of the three on the ledge, wish I could have seen it.

    Like

  3. Could this be one of the pair evicted from Gedling? I have not seen any activity there recently.

    Like

  4. RLS says:

    I did see the third falcon and guessed it was storm or a juvenile from previous years. The two adult falcons did not mind its visit at all so there’s a story! I did notice a bent backwards foot on one of the adults. I am wondering if I saw this correctly and I am hoping, if so, it will be alright.

    Like

  5. Dear Erin,
    Given the known moult phases of Peregrines, Storm would still be in immature plumage at this time in the year following hatching. Storm would not be expected to complete the first moult into adult plumage until at least August of this year.

    Like

  6. S says:

    I know crows and magpies have large family groups, with aunts and uncles and cousins helping to rear the young. Why not falcons?

    Like

  7. Melonie Pickering says:

    This is the first time I have watched this webcam…….and I am forced to admit I am totally hooked on it now! It’s fascinating watching how rapidly the chicks grow but considering how ell they are bieng fed its also quite understandable…..I now leave this webcam on through the day and nip back for a look regularly.

    Like

  8. libby says:

    how do the perigrines now when its time to eat?

    Like

    • S says:

      In the wild, most animals take food whenever they can get it, because there is no guarantee it will *always* be available. They divide all their time between either hunting for food, looking after the young, or resting.

      Like

  9. Pam Birley says:

    At the lunchtime feed today both adults were feeding the chicks. Everyone had plenty of food, including chick3 and also the parents. At one stage Mom was feeding Pop !!! So different from last year and so good to see !
    Unusual to see - two adult Peregrines feeding chicks

    Like

  10. Sue says:

    I’ve been watching off and on and curious about the health of the 3rd chick. Does anyone know if it has survived? I’ve seen no recent movement.

    Like

  11. Christine says:

    Just seen a feed and they all got something – I’m sure the parents know what they are doing with amounts of food given – the feeds seem very quick but there is no shortage of food so as long as the chicks keep opening their beaks I’m sure they will get enough, it won’t be long before they are really snatching food – I’ve got a good feeling about this little trio

    Like

  12. damiann says:

    Nice to see Storm back and for once not the weather version….!

    Like

  13. Claus says:

    May 5th, 8:16 All three spread out, basking in the sun, while the male watches over them. Today they all three showed a definite interest in the surroundings, looking at the camera or over the ledge.

    Like

  14. SueAtt says:

    Would be great if it was Storm or one of the previous years young visiting the nest site. I seem to remember last year – I think it was on Springwatch – when a youngster from a previous year turned up and was accepted by the adults rearing their new family at one of the Cathederals, possibly Bath?

    Our 3 are certainly doing very well and growing fast! 🙂

    Like

  15. SW says:

    It was Bath, Sue – I looked at the clip again recently.

    Are there any close-ups of the juvenile’s visit where the plummage could be seen in detail, or any ring? I haven’t seen any visits of a third adult to the nest – anyone else?

    Like

  16. Belinda says:

    Went past NTU on the bus yesterday. Looked up and could see one bird on the end of the ledge that we don’t normally get to see and another on the ledge at the other end. I could clearly see that he/she was preparing or eating something that had been caught and white feathers were fluttering down to the street. Will have to take the binoculars next time!

    Belinda

    Like

  17. Claus says:

    Interesting to see how the adults screens off the sun, so the young don’t get to hot.

    Re Familiy Values: I saw the third falcon visit live, she seemed not to appreciate the visitor and chased him away..The male didn’t seem to mind.

    Like

  18. tomsmum says:

    after last years ordeal its lovely to see all 3 chicks doing so well,keep up the good work Mr & Mrs P 🙂

    Like

  19. Fiona says:

    Left to their own devices they have begun squabbling! Always a good sign that they are alert and developing well!!!

    Like

  20. annette says:

    this is my first year on here but just seen mum dad and all chicks feeding together at same time and it was amazing the chicks are growing so much and are quite funny to watch love it

    Like

  21. Julie Mott says:

    The adult bird currently sitting on the chicks has a damaged foot (left one) 😦 Do we know who this bird is ?

    Like

    • Hetty says:

      Just had a good look at Mrs P and both her feet seem to be fine. Haven’t seen Mr P yet this morning except at a distance on the ledge.

      Like

  22. PammyD says:

    5:20 Breakfast time. Everyone had a huge meal! At least 15-20 mouthfuls each. Great to watch.

    Like

  23. Hetty says:

    Just been looking at Camera 1 zoomed right onto the chicks. It’s amazing to think that those fluffy little things will grow up (hopefully) into handsome birds like Mr and Mrs P!

    Like

  24. Keyworth Red says:

    Great pictures this morning 08.32, both parents feeding the chicks, well done to everybody at NTU.

    Like

  25. SW says:

    Morning, a good feed by both adults just now. Adults’ feet look fine. I wonder whether it would be possible to zoom out to the old view on Camera 2, to give a little more ‘headroom’ on the frame for standing adults.

    Like

  26. Hetty says:

    The sun seems to be bothering the little ones this morning. One in particular is panting all the time. They don’t realise if they just moved to the other side of the box they’d be in the shade. Fortunately the sun soon moves round and the box is in the shade for the rest of the day.

    Like

  27. S says:

    Just witnessed a feeding. Parent was careful to ensure all three got a good meal…although the centre chick was definitely the most vocal and the greediest ^^

    Like

  28. S says:

    I just want to note what I just observed. Of course we realize the adults are very careful about stepping around their eyases….but I always wondered what they do with their feet.

    Well, I just watched a parent return to the nest, walk over to the chicks, and prepared to snuggle in over them….and for once, I had a good clear view of the parent’s left foot, and it was interesting to me that the parent seemed very deliberate in its effort to wedge its foot *under* the chick that was sitting there, and then sort of *wiggle* its foot into the gravel of the nest….a plain effort to get as close to the chicks as possible, while at the same time being careful not to disturb, or step on them. Shows both brains and caring. Interesting.

    Like

  29. Lydia Wilson says:

    did that dead bird that was fed to the chicks around 7pm tonight have a ring on its leg?

    Like

    • Tracy says:

      Yes it did, I saw it too. It looked like a green ring around the leg.

      Like

    • Jim Shaw says:

      The majority of their prey is rung, 4 rung racing pigeons, taken off lofts in Nottingham, not wild birds, domesticated and loved and cared for

      Like

      • Lois says:

        Not unlike loved and cared for domesticated cats!

        Like

      • Lydia Wilson says:

        aye that is a shame coz they’re someone’s pet and they’re not cheap. but you can’t really fault the falcon for taking them. he’s only trying to feed his brood and can’t discriminate between wild pigeon and homing pigeon.

        Like

  30. Jill says:

    Raining but mums keeping them dry, hope it dosen’t rain to hard.

    Like

  31. Paul says:

    Wow, substantial dinner just arrived.

    Like

  32. leah says:

    is there actually any piegons left in notts

    Like

  33. SueAtt says:

    All 3 just had supper – something to be said for a beak full of feathers, nothing goes to waste does it? lol.
    There was then much jostling for the best position trying to get comfortable and ready for sleep.

    Like

  34. angie says:

    i only see 2 babies now?

    Like

  35. Julie Mott says:

    Why is the second camera pointing towards some houses ??

    Like

  36. Sue says:

    Just watched the falcon feeding the babies….again. They don’t appear to be going hungry! I love how gentle she is when feeding them and also how she carefully watches them and immediately removes the food from their beaks if the piece is too large for them to handle.
    Amazing stuff. I feel so privileged to be able to watch this.

    Like

  37. Keith says:

    Really enjoying watching the peregrines again this year.Thanks to everyone concerned.Just a thought,but would there be any chance of some type of book/booklet telling the story of these fabulous NTU birds,something similar to what the Hawk and Owl Trust has done about the Norwich Cathedral peregrines

    Like

  38. Pam Birley says:

    Latest pic in my series: This is of the birds feeding a ringed pigeon to the three chicks.

    Tea is served  - ( I'm feeling sorry for the pigeon fancier)

    Watch the whole slideshow of the 2012 and 2013 screenshots by clicking the arrows at the top of the page.

    Like

  39. Nick Brown says:

    Better late than never, the first Derby Cathedral chick hatched out this morning…..egg sighting times lie ahead at both nests now!

    Like

  40. S says:

    (I apologize in advance for the long and opinionated post…
    if the moderators choose not to post it, certainly I will understand).

    It is not my intention to say anything ignorant,
    disrespectful, callous, or gratuitously incendiary.

    My heart truly goes out to those who have lost a pet. I know how you feel.

    I have been biting my tongue,
    since I really, truly, sincerely prefer to see only positive comments in this blog,
    but I feel motivated to comment on the whole Peregrine/Pigeon/Songbird issue.

    Yes, man owes pigeons a great deal.
    Yes, the pigeons may be beloved pets.
    Yes, Peregrines also prey on songbirds.

    (I love songbirds, too….although I’ve enjoyed watching a mated pair of Cooper’s Hawks nesting in my own backyard, I have noted the decline of the songbird population with regret, too).

    But it is unjustifiable to start targeting Peregrines since they are endangered,
    and as someone previously observed,
    it is only where there is an abundance of prey, that predators will thrive.

    And our beloved housecats prey on pigeons and other birds, too.

    I felt a horrible pang when I found my own dear cat eating what was obviously one of an adorable mated pair of little downy woodpeckers from our yard, that I had been monitoring.

    But when you have a pet, any pet,
    you must accept the sad reality that potentially, bad things may happen to them.

    This is sadly especially true if you choose to get emotionally attached to an animal which is naturally prey for other animals, like a pigeon…
    ….and you are allowing it to fly freely in the outdoors!

    Surely you must realize this carries risk.
    Surely you must realize it is irresponsible to punish the natural predators.

    All we are doing here is studying and learning.
    If this pair of Peregrines didn’t nest here, they’d nest elsewhere.

    Trent U just put out the box and cam and hope for an opportunity to observe and study nature;
    they can’t force the Peregrines to choose this as their nesting site.

    (On the other hand, keeping racing pigeons as pets is not something that occurs in nature).

    What it would take to satisfy everyone who feels anger for every dead pigeon?
    Do you want to take down the nest and shoot every Peregrine out of the sky?

    Would you insist that nature not adapt to man’s cities,
    and that the Peregrines restrict themselves to coastal cliff-sides?

    To me, I am sorry, but this is utterly mindless, irresponsible and indefensible.

    Nature has the right, and the obligation, to adapt.
    Nature is under no obligation to continue to do things the same way,
    especially as man continues to change the landscape.
    If we build cities, and droves of pigeons thrive in the cities, then guess what…
    ….the predators will always follow the food source.
    And so they should.

    At the risk of sounding incendiary (and it saddens me to be so),
    I would also point out that pigeons can be one of the top-rated pest birds;

    Just from my cursory research from a few sites the web,
    pigeons are apparently quite well-documented to be potential vectors of pigeon ornithosis, encephalitis, Newcastle disease, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis,
    pseudo-tuberculosis, pigeon coccidiosis and salmonella food poisoning.

    Also pigeons can be victim to parasites which include a number of fleas, ticks and mites,
    many of which bite people and our other pets, and livestock.

    If we were overrun with pigeons, people would whistle a different tune.
    Predators are part of the balance.

    Certainly pigeons are not evil;
    they have a right to live also,
    and many other birds and animals are vectors of disease, I acknowledge that.

    *and I acknowledge that measures are likely taken by pigeon-fanciers to keep their birds healthy*
    (but again, they are flying free in the outdoors; you can’t guarantee it 100%)

    So I see no point to the periodic sullen grumbling about peregrines vs. pigeons.

    Bottom line: It is nature. Let it be.

    I thank the moderators and readers for their patience in allowing me to air my views.

    Like

    • Anne says:

      Well said S, I completely agree.

      Like

    • Francesca says:

      Very nicely put.

      thank you S, I agree with you whole heartedly. It IS nature, let it be.

      Like

    • elaine says:

      wow – what sensible person can argue with that

      Like

    • Lydia Wilson says:

      maybe that’s why I prefer to watch the ospreys even if it’s sometimes quite gory with the poor fish being hacked apart when they’re still alive and flapping lol nothing controversial there then lol

      Like

    • Kathleen Gardner says:

      You are right that you describe yourself as opinionated. But it doesn’t make your opinion the right one any more than it makes pigeon fanciers’ opinions right. Now I shall go and watch paint dry!

      Like

    • Nick says:

      Nice to read a balanced and objective argument. As you say, the falcons would nest somewhere else nearby if not at NTU. We are just fortunate that by choosing this site, they have given us the wonderful opportunity to view the raising of raising their young. I’m sure most will feel empathy for the owners of racing pigeons when they see a ringed bird being fed to the chicks but, as you say, it’s nature.

      Like

    • Eddie says:

      It always amazes me the ignorance of some people who classify racing pigeons as pests they are not .In general they are treated for all the above mentioned diseases .
      Their feral cousins probably do harbour these diseases as do all wild birds .
      I cant understand though if wild birds and I include feral pigeons are so disease ridden how the peregrines manage to survive .
      Perhaps if Peregrines where a bit bigger and where bringing Tiddles and Rover back for the chicks to feed on the attitudes would be the same

      Like

  41. PammyD says:

    Is that bulge around the throat area of one of the chicks normal?

    Like

    • SW says:

      I’ve not looked just now, but I’m sure it’s a chick full of food – the bulge is the crop, a muscular pouch where food is stored for later digestion.

      Like

  42. San says:

    In response to S……your opinion was eloquently put and I concur 100%. If peregrines were as common as pigeons, then perhaps it would be a different matter. I do feel sorry for anyone losing a pet but nature is sometimes cruel. It is the way of the world.

    Like

  43. Fiona says:

    At the last feed the chock with the bulge was sooooo greedy! I thought he may choke, even playing tug of war with the adult! Presumably that’s the alpha chick…..seems to sleep well on a full crop though!!

    Like

  44. Kelly says:

    Mrs P feeding babies at 5 past 5pm, did you see her swollow the green ring on it leg? my daughter calls feeding time a pigeon picnic! shes only 4.

    Like

  45. San says:

    14.30 Was lovely to watch the chicks preening…..and was quite surprised to see one chick feeding himself and expertly stripping meat from a scrap.

    Like

  46. Tracy says:

    15:22 feed – I hope no one got a shock from what dropped or should I say tossed from the building!!

    Like

    • Fred says:

      I saw that too. Can just imagine the look on someone’s face as that landed. Maybe there should be a sign saying “hard hats required”?

      Like

      • Tracy says:

        Haha I like the “hard hats” quote! I know I shouldn’t, but……. I was laughing when it went over – only because it wasn’t me underneath!

        Like

  47. barbara deane says:

    I was watching as the ‘wide ‘ camera zoomed in to show the first feathers beginning to poke through – sorry cannot think of the correct expression

    Like

  48. martyn says:

    things are really looking great for these 3, fantastic work to both parents, and the camera guys..!!!!!!!

    watched earlier 1 of the parents stripping a bird down to the breast on the other end of the ledge ready for the next feed.

    Like

  49. Kathleen Gardner says:

    The chicks seem to have been left alone for quite some time. I start to worry about the parents.

    Like

  50. Claus says:

    A small morning meal for those hungry (one of the youngs actually preferred his/her morning sleep, another was only mildly interested, the last ate, but with no hurry). Yesterday they got an awfull lot to eat, so no surprise to me, if they are not hungry,

    Like

  51. redtedng9 says:

    In town today I went to see the falcons from immediately below the nest, and I was rewarded straight away by Mrs P almost flying over my head with food for the young, and she then went to the nest to feed them.
    In addition, on the ledge above the nest and out of site of the cameras was a young peregrine happlily watching the goings on below him. I do not know if this was Storm, but it was certainly a juvenile in very good condition, and it was perched above the nest for well over twenty minutes.
    An excellent way to spend half an hour in the middle of town!

    Like

  52. Fred says:

    Loving this site. Beats Coronation Street. Don’t worry about the pigeons. Peregrines naturally hunted Rock Doves, the Domestic Pigeons ancestor, long before mankind trained them. Too many instances of man wishing to place his authority and needs first by persecuting things that interfered with his assumed ‘domain’. Herons, Otters, Badgers, Eagles, Kites, Owls, Harriers, Hawks and Falcons all have a perfect right to do what they do.

    Like

    • Fran Johnson says:

      Fred, is it just the wildlife you mention that have a perfect right to do what they do or are they just your selected few, it would be interesting to hear your views

      Like

      • Fred says:

        Sorry Fran,
        I was not ignoring your question but I have been away since 14th and only just seen it when scrolling down the thread following an ‘alert’.
        No, I am a fan of all wildlife and believe it all has a place in the scheme of things. I merely singled out some of those that do suffer persecution in the UK. Does that answer your question?
        Incidentally I was travelling in Slovenija when your message was posted. Guess what? I was looking for the remaining 40 Wolves left in that country. (I was successful too!) Bears are around 600 and thriving despite them being hunted and sometimes, wait for this, made into Salami! We used to have Bears and Wolves in UK too.
        Back to my loving all wildlife. Can I make an exception for the bloody Horsefly that just bit my jaw this morning?

        Like

  53. San says:

    My word, the chicks are really finding their feet today. They seem to be in a different spot every time I look. They have an almost comical presence about them as they clumsily try to make their legs work. They evoke a smile every time. I’m sure they’ve made a lot of people happy…..and yes, much better than Coronation Street!

    Like

  54. SallyE says:

    The chicks looked a little worried just now when one of the parents turned up with a whole pigeon and promptly plucked it on the ledge in front of them. Nearly every time I look at them they are being fed, no wonder they’re such whoppers now. And what big feet they have too.

    Like

  55. Fred says:

    When the chicks ‘roused’ and stretched, their Primary feathers and Tails show new quills coming through quite strongly now.
    I took some nice Screen shots of one Adult spring cleaning the tray after the feed at 9.35 today.

    Like

  56. barbara deane says:

    one chick handed a complete leg + ring – it happened too fast to be able to read the number

    Like

  57. San says:

    15.00 Did anyone else just see what I saw…..one of the chicks swallowing a WHOLE pigeon leg?!

    Like

  58. Fred says:

    Three O clock feed. Pigeon had a yellow ring on left leg. I thoght one chick was ging to eat the whole head that had come off. Another swallowed a leg whole. The ringed leg was dropped bottom right after being played with.

    Like

  59. Kelly says:

    Is that little chick going to be ok eating a whole pigeon foot and ring? Will it digest it alright?

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi Kelly,

      Thanks for your question. Little if anything is wasted on a kill as the act of catching prey is the most energy using and dangerous time for a bird of prey. A stray foot or claw in the eye, or damage to feathers of the adult, will lead to it being a less efficient flyer or even death. The head and legs of prey are usually eaten by the parents as these are large, tough items that take some digesting. These will be fed to large young as they mature or smaller young when foraging is difficult.

      Hope that helps

      Like

  60. John Jones says:

    Ive just been watching the youngsters feeding and i was trying to guage the sizes and it looks to me as if we have 2 females and a male chick. no doubt someone will say ‘We know this already’ haha. i was astounded by the size of their feet especially on the 2 larger chicks. The feet just show you what true hunters they are as they need these to strike the prey in midair or hold on to their intended quarry. Brilliant cameras by the way and love checking in now and again to see their progress.

    Like

  61. HA says:

    Their crops seems to have been full of food for days now – is that usual?

    Like

    • chrisntu says:

      Hi,

      Thanks for your question. It’s not unusual. Peregrines fill themselves to bursting point with food and sit / sleep while they are digesting it. The time it takes depends to a large degree on the weather conditions in warm weather the birds use most of the energy gained from the food for growth in cold weather on keep themselves warm.

      Hope that helps.

      Like

  62. Fiona says:

    At the last feed one of the chicks devoured a whole leg and foot plus the plastic ring….will this degrade or cause problems on the chick’s gullet. This was about half the length of the chick so presumably would bypass the crop. The other foot and leg is still in the nest as the other two didn’t seem so taken by it!

    Like

    • Kelly says:

      I posted the same comment and its still waiting moderation! Im worried how the ring will be digested, ive seen mum eat the rings with no problem but the chicks have such tiny tummies.

      Like

    • SallyE says:

      I was rather taken aback when I saw this too.

      Like

  63. John Jones says:

    Just a quick one on the debate of the peregrines killing birds. if you look at statistics the domestic cat accounts for a larger percentage of Songbirds/Birds killed than Birds of Prey ever will, however we dont hear of people calling for the head of Cats. At the end of the day what these magnificent birds do is natural. They prey on the weak, the infirm and young, hence the breeding season coincides with other nesting birds around the country. Just be grateful that we can view these birds in their natural environment and enjoy them too.

    Like

    • Fiona says:

      totally agree John, maybe the rings should be made of non toxic non plastic substance that would not harm the chicks! Soya protein maybe? Or better still chip the pigeons with bio degradable chips.

      Like

      • Jim Shaw says:

        totally agree John, maybe the rings should be made of non toxic non plastic substance that would not harm the chicks! Soya protein maybe? Or better still chip the pigeons with bio degradable chips.
        Or maybe the rings should be made with a very noxious substance or explosives, get real!

        Like

    • Mandy Ireland says:

      I agree with you, John and I am utterly addicted to this fab-cam and enthralled by the developing chicks and their parents. And if my terrier or cat or guinea pig etc. was taken by an Eagle Owl I would be heart-broken and full of rage at feeling so helpless.in the face of the loss and the violent end my beloved pet had met. I have the utmost sympathy with the owners of those pigeons. I am sad that some of the blog entries seem so unnecessarily oppositional.. These falcons are amazing and the pigeons are loved birds whose owners of course feel grief and rage at their violent loss..

      Like

    • Jim Shaw says:

      it isn,t natural. They are not idigenous to this country, whereas the European Eagle owl is, but when they appear the RSPB are quick to cull them, Is this because they eat peregrines?
      Your playing with nature, and the birds taken aren,t weak, in the slightest.
      You don,t obviously realise that the rest of the flock panic, when the peregrine comes in amongst them, its not one kill it is multiple deathds and fatal injury to the birds as they try to evade capture.

      Like

  64. Sue says:

    The falcon arrived with a whole pigeon about 2 hours ago and they finished the lot between them! One swallowed a whole foot without too much problem! Another tried to take on the head which had become detached from the body. It should be gruesome but somehow, it’s not. It is nature in the raw. Totally fascinating.
    First time I have witnessed the adults plucking a bird on the nesting site.

    Amazing to watch.

    Like

  65. Fred says:

    I don’t think the leg wth the yellow ring was swallowed. I think it was dropped by the 2nd chick to try it down on the bottom right of the box. But the other leg went down whole sure enough.
    Those digestive juices are mighty strong. Eatable stuff will be digested and the uneatable bits come back up as Pellets. That’s why parents feed them the feathers too.

    Like

    • Fiona says:

      Thanks Fred, I wasn’t sure if they did produce pellets….Barn Owl pellets are really interesting to take apart and give a great insight into the predator habitat. Interestingly just followed a pigeon racing lorry along the A52 this morning, a race nearby maybe.

      Like

  66. Hetty says:

    I’ve been away for the weekend and when I looked in on the nest this morning I just couldn’t believe how much the chicks had grown since Friday.

    Like

  67. Julie Mott says:

    Raining hard ….. poor chicks are getting wet as they’re too big for Mrs P to keep covered !

    Like

  68. Julie Mott says:

    Wonderful to watch the developing characters ….. one playing with Dad’s tail 🙂

    Like

  69. Pam Birley says:

    While on the subject of pellets etc. I wonder why their excrement is white when most of what they consume is dark flesh ? Hope you have had your lunch :-)))

    Like

  70. andy says:

    wow…just seen something ive never seen before…the female feeding the chicks stopped to eat one of the pigeon legs,only problem was it had a green racing pigeon ring on the leg,just wondered if she will be able to pass the ring naturally

    Like

  71. Ashley says:

    Will you be releasing the ring numbers of the tracing pigeons eaten by the peregrine?

    Like

    • gillyntu says:

      Hi Ashley, as stated in our FAQs all rings found in the nest are logged with the Royal Racing Pigeon Association.

      Like

      • Jim Shaw says:

        That isn,t really true is it, you may pay lip service by reporting a few, but not all, as you, don,t want the extent of the predation found out do, you?

        Like

  72. Jo says:

    Did I, or did I not see the remains of a cockatoo being taken to the nest this morning (25 May)? I don’t know of any pigeons having pure white plumage with bright pink ‘accessories@

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  73. Len says:

    Alot of racing pigeons can be found as strays in market places and are fed by the public. Power stations also attract them in winter.Many do carry rings.

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    • Jim Shaw says:

      Yes Len, thats why the pigeon men of Nottingham actually witness them taking pigeons over their lofts, and with the greatest of respect, just looking at the condition of the feathering on the rung pigeons brought back to the nest, shows they have not been living wild

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      • Sean says:

        I “really don’t” see the point of bellyaching about it on here! Perhaps you pigeon lovers would be much happier if we simply let Falcons dwindle and die out completely? They have chosen to move into our towns and cities because of what “WE”, Mankind” have done or are doing to their natural habitat ! Spiders eat insects,.. birds eat spiders,… cats eat mice,… lions eat mammals, .. and believe it or not,.. Falcons eat Birds, “Get over it” !!!

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  74. Jim Shaw says:

    Sean, you really do not understand nature, I am happy for falcons to be here in THEIR NATURAL HABITAT, which for this particular type of Falcon is, cliffs and rock faces, of disused quarries, so Sean could you explain how on earth you get that WE mankind have destroyed their natural habitat, their are more disused quarries than ever, and I haven,t seen any cliffs redeveloped lately? They did not choose to come into our towns and cities they were introduced by the RSPB artificially, and why shouldn,t people bellyache, when they see their lifes past time being taken away, and their own stock killed in their own back gardens, and then some junior Chris Packham filming and glorifying it.
    You get over it, and respect the fact that others are enduring suffering not by the acts of these birds, but by the Selfish Individuals, who have placed them there.

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    • Fred says:

      Jim, I know I am late with this but I really should come on and say that you are talking rot!
      Peregrines were NOT ‘introduced’ to Cities. Where is your evidence for that?
      They came of their own accord. They did not come when we all lived in Semis but when we built tall buildings that, to them, make good breeding habitat. Much the same as Starlings and other birds come into towns to roost on cold nights. And Foxes have taken up living in Urban areas. Any animal or bird needs territory and cities seem to provide them with that.

      The Rock Dove (Columba livia, exactly the same species as the Domestic Racer) used to frequent cliffs and whilst the cliffs still stand the public pressure on them is causing disturbance. So both birds, Falcon and Dove are rare there now.
      Yes, it is no doubt heart breaking when fanciers lose a bird and I do sympathise. But that bird could have been lost in many ways other than a Falcon. It is what happens when you fly birds freely. And killing the Trent family would achieve nothing. Another pair would take up the empty niche.

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  75. Damian Taylor says:

    Why not leave your squabbling for the playground…

    Like

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